FAO FISHERIES PROCEEDINGS 7

FAO FISHERIES PROCEEDINGS
7

Sixth World Congress on
Seafood Safety, Quality and Trade

1416 September 2005
Sydney, Australia

Edited by

David James
Consultant
FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department

Lahsen Ababouch
Chief
Fish Utilization and Marketing Service
FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department

and

Sally Washington
Consultant
FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department


FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2007

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Table of Contents


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ISBN 978-92-5-105808-4
ISSN 1813-3940

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James, D.; Ababouch, L.; Washington, S.(eds).
Sixth World Congress on Seafood Safety, Quality and Trade. Sydney, Australia,
1416 September 2005.
FAO Fisheries Proceedings. No. 7. Rome, FAO. 2007. 206p.

ABSTRACT

Fish and fish products are among the most traded food commodities: close to 40 percent by volume ends up in international markets. About half of those exports by value originate in developing countries. Yet around three-quarters of fish exports finish up in just three markets; the European Union, Japan and the United States of America. China is an increasingly important player both as an exporter and an importer. Consumers expect that the fish they have access to will be safe and of acceptable quality, regardless of where it is produced or ultimately consumed. Measures to encourage the harmonization of safety and quality standards and to facilitate international trade are part of the regulatory framework generated by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The Codex Alimentarius Commission also plays an important role in setting international standards for food safety. Despite international agreements, fish exporters still face safety and quality regimes that vary from one jurisdiction to another. The current multitude of approaches imposes significant costs on exporters, especially those from developing countries where there is limited capacity to develop comprehensive safety and control infrastructures.

Progress on harmonization has been slow. While there are steady gains in the implementation of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems, there is still too much reliance worldwide on testing end products. More emphasis needs to be put on developing risk analysis approaches to food safety and encouraging good practices across the food chain. Safety and quality standards, codes of practice, and risk-management strategies need to be based on robust scientific data. This requires investment in research into the epidemiology and prevention of food-borne hazards, including those associated with new products entering international markets.

New players and new relationships are also influencing international trade in fish products. As trade liberalization dismantles tariffs and governments streamline regulation, private sector stakeholders are entering the arena with new health and safety standards, typically linked to their marketing, quality management or corporate social responsibility programmes. These impact on exporters and may impose new compliance costs and influence trade patterns. On the other hand, new forms of collaboration between industry and government regulatory agencies, and in some cases even community groups, are driving innovations and new partnerships in managing fish quality and safety.

These and other issues are addressed in this document, which represents the proceedings of the Sixth World Congress on Seafood Safety, Quality and Trade held in Sydney, Australia from 14 to 16 September 2005. The Congress was held under the auspices of the International Association of Fish Inspectors (IAFI), in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO).

©FAO 2007


Contents

Preparation of this document  (Download pdf 191 kb)
Abstract
Acknowledgement

Executive summary

Annex 1 -  List of contributors

Annex 2 -  programme

SECTION 1 - WORLD TRADE IN SEAFOOD: KEY TRENDS AND ISSUES  (Download pdf 337 kb)

Challenges for the global seafood industry
Grimur Valdimarsson

International seafood trade: the rules and the rorts
Alastair Macfarlane

Fish to 2020 in changing global markets: trade liberalization
market access constraints for developing countries
Mahfuzuddin Ahmed

Free trade agreements: implications for global seafood
supply and demand
Nicolas Brown

International food standards: trends and significance to
the seafood sector
Steve McCutcheon


SECTION 2 - MAJOR IMPORTERS: REQUIREMENTS AND OPPORTUNITIES  (Download pdf 435 kb)

European Union importing requirements and opportunities
Richard Bates

Japanese importing requirements and opportunities
Kazuhiro Kondo

The Canadian Fish Import Inspection Program: new directions
Susan Schenkeveld

The management of import and export seafood safety and
quality in China
Wang Hongbing, Zheng Yuhong and Li Qiang

Detentions and rejections in international fish trade
Lahsen Ababouch


SECTION 3 - BUILDING CAPACITY FOR SAFETY AND QUALITY  (Download pdf 405 kb)

A review of the capacity-building efforts in developing
countries case study: Africa
Ahmidou Ouaouich

Approaches to achieving seafood safety in East Africa
Nancy Gitonga

Uptake of HACCP in developing seafood industries in
N. Anandavally

Rebuilding capacity after the tsunami: lessons learned
Lahsen Ababouch

Regulatory convergence in a global marketplace
Graham Peachey

Regulatory options for processing vessel inspections
Alfred Bungay

Human resources in seafood processing: the Canadian experience
Johanna Oehling


SECTION 4 - NEW PARTNERSHIPS FOR ACHIEVING FISH SAFETY  (Download pdf 241 kb)
AND QUALITY

ISO 22000: food safety management systems and their
related requirements
Philippa Seagrave

Mercury in fish: using targeted consumer advice
as a key risk management tool
Samara Kitchener, Adrian Bradley and George Davey

Mercury in fish: using targeted consumer advice
as a key risk management tool
Samara Kitchener, Adrian Bradley and George Davey

Proactive environmental management: Clean Green rock
lobster presents a fully-integrated product management strategy
Paul McShane, Roger Edwards, Matt Muggleton and David Milne

The Global Food Safety Initiative
Alan Fagerland


SECTION 5 - RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND RISK ANALYSIS  (Download pdf 437 kb)

SEAFODplus: international seafood research
H. Allan Bremner

Tailoring farmed Atlantic salmon with low levels of dioxins
Marc H.G. Berntssen and Anne-Katrine Lundebye

International risk assessment for Vibrio cholerae in seafood
Iddya Karunasagar and John Sumner

Cost-benefit analysis and risk management 
Hector Lupin

Back Cover  (Download pdf 372 kb)

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