FAO Fisheries Circular No. 968 FIIU/C968 (En)


ISSN 0429-9329

 

PROSPECTS FOR SEAWEED PRODUCTION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

 

by

Dennis J. McHugh
Consultant
27 Gillespie Street
Weetangera Act 2600
Australia

Table of Content


FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2002

 

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FAO 2001

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Preparation of this document

1. THE SEAWEED INDUSTRY - AN OVERVIEW 

2. ABOUT SEAWEEDS

3. THE SEAWEED INDUSTRY

3.1 Seaweeds as food

3.2 Seaweeds as sources of hydrocolloids

3.3 Brown seaweeds as sources of alginate

3.4 Red seaweeds as sources of agar

3.5 Red seaweeds as sources of carrageenan

3.6 Other uses of seaweeds

4. FUTURE PROSPECTS FOR THE SEAWEED INDUSTRY

4.1 Future directions for FAO - feedback from industry

4.1.1 Value of short-term contracts for surveys and experimental farming trials
4.1.2 Long-term programmes
4.1.3 Regional workshops
4.1.4 Expatriate consultants
4.1.5 Why some projects fail
4.1.6 Successful projects
4.1.7 Cultivation for the phycocolloid industry
4.1.8 Promoting the use of indigenous species - integrated aquaculture
4.1.9 Excellent ideas from Great Sea Vegetables
4.1.10 Introduction of non-indigenous species

4.2 Future prospects in African countries

4.2.1 Kenya
4.2.2 Morocco
4.2.3 Mozambique
4.2.4 Namibia
4.2.5 Senegal
4.2.6 South Africa
4.2.7 United Republic of Tanzania

4.3 Future prospects in Asian countries

4.3.1 Bangladesh
4.3.2 China
4.3.3 India
4.3.4 Indonesia
4.3.5 Malaysia
4.3.6 Sri Lanka
4.3.7 Thailand
4.3.8 Viet Nam

4.4 Future prospects in Latin American countries

4.4.1 Argentina
4.4.2 Brazil
4.4.3 Colombia
4.4.4 Cuba
4.4.5 Ecuador
4.4.6 Mexico
4.4.7 Peru
4.4.8 Venezuela
4.4.9 West Indies

4.5 Future prospects in the Pacific Islands

5. SUMMARY

5.1 FAO involvement in the seaweed industries - suggestions

5.2 Prospects in developing countries

5.2.1 African countries
5.2.2 Asian countries
5.2.3 Latin American countries
5.2.4 Pacific Island countries

5.3 Countries where market studies might be useful

5.4 Countries needing assistance for seaweed cultivation or related activities

5.5 Developing countries as raw material suppliers

5.6 Developing countries - prospects for processing industries

APPENDIX A

APPENDIX B