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Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) control

Strengthening animal health systems through improved control of major diseases

 

Highlights


Working for...
87 FMD-affected nations in Africa, Asia, the Middle East,
and South America

Working to...
reduce or eliminate FMD virus circulation by 2027

 

Key facts

Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) is a viral animal disease that affects cattle, buffaloes, pigs, sheep, goats and various wildlife species. Though the FMD had been largely controlled in North America and in some Pacific nations and Western Europe, it remains endemic across large swathes of Eurasia, the Middle East, Africa and a few countries in South America. Although FMD doesn’t directly affect human beings, its negative impacts livestock production and disruptive effect on regional and international trade in animals and animal products are a cause for concern. FMD in low and middle income countries results in production losses, reduced household income and food insecurity especially among subsistence farmers.

Progressive Control Pathway (PCP-FMD)

The FAO and OIE have partnered with FAO-based European Commission for the Control of Food-and-Mouth Disease (EuFMD) and developed the Progressive Control Pathway for Food-and-Mouth Disease control (PCP-FMD) in 2008; a series of technical phases to guide countries of prevalence through a successful FMD control program. The PCP-FMD has also become a joint FAO-EuFMD-OIE guide for national programs that standardized carefully monitored steps.

Global FMD control strategy

With the view of easing the impacts of the FMD, FAO and OIE developed, in 2012, a 15-year global control strategy. The global FMD control strategy has since served as basis to a number of initiates including the establishment and expansion of an enabling environment to make FMD control feasible in affected countries. Out of 87 FMD-affected nations, at least 60 are currently engaged in the implementation of PCP-FMD with the goal of reducing or eliminating FMD virus circulation by 2027. While South America and South East Asia have made commendable progress, a number of countries in Asia, Middle East and Africa are yet to translate commitments into tangible results.

 

 

Contact

  Comments: EMPRES-Animal Health webmaster

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