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5. Results of the fishing experiments

Some of the results of the fishing experiments are commented on below. One should note, however, that most of the fishing forms part of a programme for “swept area” biomass estimation, and for this purpose the trawl stations are positioned in advance more or less randomly and with no intention of obtaining high catch rates. The catch rates thus do not simulate those of a commercial fishery and they are presented here merely to give a rough impression of the general occurrence, composition and abundance offish on the shelf. The results may thus not be directly comparable to catch rates from previous fishing surveys.

The bottom trawl used is a shrimp-cum-fish trawl (see Annex 1). It is uncertain how the efficiency of this trawl with respect to shrimp compares with the special gear used by the commercial shrimp fleet.

Suriname.

The catch records of all trawls stations are shown in Annex II, nos. 299 - 338. Table 1 shows an analysis of catch rates (standardized to kg per hours towing) for all successful bottom trawl hauls by broad groups of fish and for the inner and outer shelf separately. “Demersal” comprises the families Sciaenidae, Ariidae, Pomadasiydae, Serranidae and Lutjanidae and “Pelagic”: Engraulidae, Clupeidae, Carangidae, Scombridae, Sphyraenidae and Trichiuridae. Mean catch rates are highest on the inner shelf for both demersal and sharks. Catch rates for pelagic fish in a bottom trawl is not very meaningful, but the indication is a higher availability on the inner shelf. Sharks and squid showed highest catch rates on the inner shelf. The squids, Loligo palaei and L. plei were markedly more abundant than in Survey I and the highest catch rates were obtained during daytime in 25 - 35 m depth. In general only low catch rates of shrimps were obtained except for st. 308 which represents the standardized rates of a 12 min haul (stuck in mud) with catches of 144 kg of seabob and 48 kg of P. subtilis.

Table 1. SURINAME. Catch rates for main groups in bottom trawl stations standardized to kg/hour.

INNER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Demersal

Sharks

Shrimp

Pelagic

Squid

Other

306

40

3.00



17.00

2.80

2.00

307

32

303.80

86.40


1054.80


7.20

308

20

625.00


960.00

532.50


160,00

309

11

47.60


29.60

107.80


4.80

310

18

57.60


24.00

168.40


30.80

312

34

105.60


1.60

142.80


114.60

321

30

7.40


4.60

3.40

4.00

36.80

322

27

285.40

105.60


2396.20


68.40

323

31

2.00



286.00

95.00


324

27




36.90

84.00

0.80

325

16


17.40


20.00


21.20

326

24

6.30

4.20


95.10

18.00

4.10

327

32

150.94



1833.94

29.44


328

20

3.60

4.60


177.20


31.00

329

24

113.10

5.40


182.80

9.00

10.20

330

30

38.20


3.00

29.20


263.20

331

28

60.80


0.80

16.00

1.60

29.60

335

37

1.60



7.60

5.00

0.70

336

28

12.00



187.20

42.00

132.00

337

26

1726.80



242.40

12.60

18.20

MEAN


177.54

11.18

51.18

376.86

15.17

46.78


OUTER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Demersal

Sharks

Shrimp

Pelagic

Squid

Other

299

81

25.10

13.64


22.09

0.27

9.02

300

86




199.80

0.90

1.20

301

115

40.20



59.00



302

91

151.00



212.80


7.20

303

77


11.00


32.80


1.20

304

92

0.60

30.00


73.40


66.00

305

56




0.10


0.10

313

83

185.80

25.40


199.60


6.00

314

78

34.56

1.68


33.24


1.20

315

80

12.80



252.00

4.00

8.40

316

72

235.60



121.80

1.40

80.20

317

82

230.40



499.20


50.40

318

65

493.80



185.40

5.40

3.60

319

50

143.20



319.90

1.40

19.60

332

81

38.55




3.90


333

59

1.50

9.40



2.80

1.50

334

48

36.60



309.00


16.20

MEAN


95.87

5.36


148.24

1.18

15.99


Table 2 presents an analysis of catch rates by families of demersal fish for the two parts of the shelf. The predominance of catfish, croakers and grunts on the inner shelf and of snapper on the outer part is evident. The lane snapper Lutjanus synagris formed an important part of the catches in the 25 - 40 m depth zone. The species in the inshore assemblage were largely the same as those found in Survey I: king - and green weakfishes, Macrodon ancylodon and Cynoscion virescens dominated among the croakers, the corocoro - and bronzestriped grunts Orthopristes ruber and Haemulon boschme among the grunts and the white catfish Bagre bagre was the most common of that family. On the outer shelf the red snapper Lutjanus purpureus occurred with limited catch rates while the small size vermillion snapper Rhomboplites aurorubens was generally more abundant. The catch rates for the various groups are largely similar to those obtained in Survey I although there are some differences in mean rates mainly caused by a few very high rates obtained in that survey.

Table 2. SURINAME. Catch rates by families for demersal fish, kg/hour.

INNER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Catfish

Croakers

Grunts

Groupers

Snappers

Other

306

40





3.00

21.80

307

32


126.00

122.40


55.40

1148.40

308

20

180.00

445.00




1652.50

309

11

0.40

47.20




142.20

310

18

5.60

52.00




223.20

312

34


28.80

34.20

2.40

40.20

259.00

321

30



2.80

0.20

4.40

48.80

322

27

58.60

187.20

17.60


22.00

2570.20

323

31




1.00

1.00

381.00

324

27






121.70

325

16






58.60

326

24


0.30

5.40


0.60

121.40

327

32



9.75


141.19

1863.38

328

20

3.60





212.80

329

24


2.10

10.20


100.80

207.40

330

30


31.60

6.60



295.40

331

28



30.40

4.40

26.00

48.00

335

37





1.60

13.30

336

28



3.60


8.40

361.20

337

26



11.80


1715.00

273.20

MEAN


12.41

46.01

12.74

0.40

105.98

501.17


OUTER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Catfish

Croakers

Grunts

Groupers

Snappers

Other

299

81


2.73


0.55

21.82

45.02

300

86






201.90

301

115





40.20

59.00

302

91





151.00

220.00

303

77






45.00

304

92





0.60

169.40

305

56






0.20

313

83




35.00

150.80

231.00

314

78





34.56

36. 12

315

80





12.80

264.40

316

72




40.60

195.00

203.40

317

82





230.40

549.60

318

65



32.40

20.00

441.40

194.40

319

50



30.80


112.40

340.90

332

81





38.55

3.90

333

59





1.50

13.70

334

48





36.60

325.20

MEAN



0.16

3.72

5.66

86.33

170.77


Table 3 shows the standardized catch rates for the different types of pelagic fish in trawl stations from the inner and outer shelf including also hauls with pelagic trawl. Especially the bottom trawl is selective for different types of pelagic fish and Clupeids and Engraulids will be underrepresented compared with the other groups.

Table 3. SURINAME. Catch rates by families of pelagic fish in pelagic and bottom trawl hauls, kg/hour.

INNER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Sardines

Anchovies

Carangids

Scombrids

Barracudas

Other

306

40

6.60


8.60

0.40


9.20

307

32

536.40



82.80

54.00

779.00

308

20


512.00

12.50

8.00


1745.00

309

11

5.00

34.80

30.40

28.80


90.80

310

18

6.40

146.40

0.80

2.80


124.40

311


136.80

67.20

12.00



68.00

312

34

9.00


132.00


1.80

221.80

320

10

618.00


31.00



8.00

321

30



2.80


0.60

52.80

322

27

1369.00


49.20

73.20


1364.20

323

31


32.00

234.00



117.00

324

27

10.00


1.90

25.00


84.80

325

16


9.00

5.00

6.00


38.60

326

24

7.20

70.40

2.00

2.10

0.60

45.40

327

32

6.56


948.19

68.81

810.38

180.38

328

20

5.20

26.00

38.40

25.60

3.60

117.60

329

24

101.40

22.20

8.40

17.00

18.80

152.70

330

30



21.60


7.60

304.40

331

28

11.20


4.00


0.80

92.80

335

37

1.50


6.10



7.30

336

28

1.20


180.00

6.00


186.00

337

26

17.60


39.80

185.00


1757.60

338


104.00

132.80

12.00

46.60


51.40

MEAN


128.39

45.77

77.42

25.14

39.05

330.40


OUTER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Sardines

Anchovies

Carangids

Scombrids

Barracudas

Other

299

81



16.36


5.18

48.58

300

86

4.80


180.00


15.00

2.10

301

115

2.20


56.80



40.20

302

91

0.80


212.00



158.20

303

77



19.80

10.60


14.60

304

92



44.60

14.00


111.40

305

56



0.10



0.10

313

83



146.00

46.60

2.00

222.20

314

78

0.72


22.92

6.00


41.04

315

80

56.00


194.40

1.60


25.20

316

72



30.80


91.00

317.20

317

82



499.20



280.80

318

65

135.00


50.40



502.80

319

50



235.90

84.00


164.20

332

81






42.45

333

59






15.20

334

48

82.40


215.60


11.00

52.80

MEAN


16.58


113.23

9.58

7.30

119.95


There is as previously an absence of anchovies on the outer shelf and also sardines are scarce here, the family being represented only by Atlantic sardinella, Sardinella aurita. Most of the carangid catches in deep water consisted of rough scad, Trachurus lathami and bigeye scad Selar crumenopthalmus.

On the inner shelf anchovies appeared to be less common and abundant than in Survey I. Sardines were well represented with thread herring, Opisthonema oglinum as the most common form, but a number of catches of scaled herring, Harengula jaguana, American pellona Pellone harroweri and dogtooth herring Chirocentrodon bleekerianus were also made.

The bumper Chloroscombrus chrysurus was common inshore with some Decapterus sp.

The catch rates for Spanish mackerels and barracudas were higher than in survey I. The spotted type Scomberomorus maculatus was the most common form.

Pooled samples of the length frequencies of the most common of these species are shown in Annex III.

Guyana.

For records of the fishing stations reference is made to Annex II from st. 339 on. For the purpose of the following analysis an overlap has been made and some stations made in Venezuelan waters have been included. Table 4 shows the standardized catch rates for the broad groups and for the inner and outer shelf (shallower resp deeper than 60 m). All groups show low catch rates offshore. Squids show highest rates in the east and sharks in the inshore western part. The catch rates for all these groups except squid are considerably lower than in Survey I. For squid the rates are markedly higher in this survey.

The relatively high rates for shrimp in some of the shallow water hauls derive from Nematopalaemon schmitti and Xiphopenaeus kroyeri. Catch rates for the large sized Penaeid shrimps were low, up to 10 kg/hour and included the pink, white and red spotted species. In general these rates were down from Survey I.

Table 5 presents the catch rates by families for demersal fish on the inner and outer parts of the shelf. As previously catfish and croakers dominate the inner - and snappers with some groupers the outer shelf. The king weakfish Macrodon ancylodon dominate the croakers with some green - Cynoscion virescens and Jamaica weakfish Cynoscion jamaicensis. The red snapper Lutjanus purpureus was the most common of this family and in contrast to further east it occurred up to abt. 40 m of depth.

Table 4. GUYANA. Catch rates for main groups in bottom trawl stations standardized to kg/hour.

INNER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Demersal

Sharks

Shrimp

Pelagic

Squid

Other

339

20

160.00

1.60

76.80

40.00


116.80

340

27

1.00



18.30

31.00

6.60

341

28




106.40

26.00

1.40

342

23

31.20



98.80

15.20

4.40

343

19


12.00


219.60


207.60

344

24

9.60

1.60


358.40

46.40

56.00

345

25

2.80


3.40

97.20

20.00

32.80

349

49

70.20



2.20

2.20

17.60

350

45

134.00

1.00


21.20

1.00

53.00

351

27




164.00

18.00

2.50

352

22

2.00


0.60

35.60

5.00

19.30

354

24

130.90


1.00

98.40


33.50

355

22



1.20

64.80

0.60

10.80

356

17

380.60

28.00

43.40

130.20


309.60

357

22

16.00



335.00


40.00

358

15

219.01


113.54

25.39


11.76

360

23

103.21


1.03

283.79



361

42

1.20


1.00

22.60

2.20

10.80

362

56




1.20

7.00

2.80

363

44

0.20



212.40

8.00

0.60

364

39

982.40



167.20


88.00

365

37

3.80


0.60

71.30

0.60

0.60

366

35

66.80

2.00

3.40

114.20


87.40

369

15

162.20


28.00

101.00


159.20

370

29

8.00

1.40


759.60


7.20

371

18

288.40

28.20

12.00

136.00


112.00

372

57




62.60

1.20

0.80

375

11

163.40


18.00

238.20


53.00

376

52

3.80

33.80


45.90


0.70

377

30

1.10



33.90


0.50

378

14

7.40

28.80

3.60

228.00


22.40

379

43


11.40


45.30


1.20

MEAN


92.16

4.68

9.61

135.58

5.76

45.96


OUTER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Demersal

Sharks

Shrimp

Pelagic

Squid

Other

346

72

33.80



8.20

4.00

1.00

347

61

2.90



0.10

3.00

1.80

348

77

17.50



51.44

2.10

44.10

367

68

74.40


3.20

0.40

0.80

34.40

368

66

34.00


5.40


0.80

56.00

373

81

2.40



12.20

1.40

11.20

374

84

105.00



6.60


7.80

380

61


1.40

1.00

7.60

4.80

42.20

381

76

79.60



8.90

2.80

4.40

382

76

88.50


4.80

1.80

0.60

55.50

383

82

140.80

5.60

5.60


3.20

78.80

384

68

19.20

2.00

9.00

11.00

5.60

52.60

MEAN


51.41

0.83

3.27

9.34

2.63

35.65


Table 6 presents the catch rates analysed by families of pelagic fish. The mean rates for the various groups are approximately as in Survey I, but with more Scombrids on the inner - and less Carangids on the outer shelf. The sardinella, thread - and scaled herrings were the most common Clupeids and bumper, bluntnose jack and bigeye scad dominated the Carangids. The spotted Spanish mackerel appeared to be more common than the king mackerel as in Suriname.

Table 5. GUYANA. Catch rates by families for demersal fish, kg/hour.

INNER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Catfish

Croakers

Grunts

Groupers

Snappers

Other

339

20

6.80

150.80

2.40



235.20

340

27


0.30



0.70

55.90

341

28






133.80

342

23



1.20


30.00

118.40

343

19






439.20

344

24





9.60

462.40

345

25


2.60


0.20


153.40

349

49





70.20

22.00

350

45



0.20


133.80

76.20

351

27






184.50

352

22


0.80

0.60

0.20

0.40

60.50

354

24

12.00

118.90




132.90

355

22






77.40

356

17

23.80

356.80




511.20

357

22


16.00




375.00

358

15

12.93

206.08




150.69

360

23

25.37

77.84




284.82

361

42





1.20

36.60

362

56






11.00

363

44





0.20

221.00

364

39



76.80


905.60

255.20

365

37


3.80




73.10

366

35


10.00

21.20


35.60

207.00

369

15

56.20

106.00




288.20

370

29


8.00




768.20

371

18

142.40

146.00




288.20

372

57






64.60

375

11

6.00

157.40




309.20

376

52





3.80

80.40

377

30



0.30


0.80

34.40

378

14

1.80

5.60




282.80

379

43






57.90

MEAN


8.98

42.72

3.21

0.01

37.25

201.60


OUTER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Catfish

Croakers

Grunts

Groupers

Snappers

Other

346

72





33.80

13.20

347




0.10


2.80

4.90

348

77



9.10


8.40

97.64

367

68


1.60



72.80

38.80

368

66


3.60

0.80

7.20

22.40

62.20

373

81





2.40

24.80

374

84



0.80

63.40

40.80

14.40

380

61






57.00

381

76





79.60

16.10

382

76


0.30

3.00

1.20

84.00

62.70

383

82


3.20

4.80

5.60

127.20

93.20

384

68


13.80


2.40

3.00

80.20

MEAN



2.93

1.55

7.05

39.88

51.71


Annex IV shows pooled length distributions of the most common species.

Table 6. GUYANA. Catch rates by families of pelagic fish in pelagic - and bottom trawl hauls, kg/hour.

INNER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Sardines

Anchovies

Carangids

Scombrids

Barracudas

Other

339

20

2.40

16.00




376.80

340

27



0.30

18.00


38.60

341

28

50.00


30.40

26.00


27.40

342

23

30.40


31.60

36.80


50.80

343

19

9.60

102.00

46.80

13.20

18.00

249.60

344

24

8.80

5.60

27.20

312.80


117.60

345

25

24.00


72.60


0.60

59.00

349

49



2.20



90.00

350

45



7.60

13.20

0.40

189.00

351

27

36.00


128.00



20.50

352

22

3.60


30.80


1.20

26.90

353


540.00

85.60

69.80

22.60

2.80

1.80

354

24

62.00


11.40



190.40

355

22

42.60


19.80

1.20

1.20

12.60

356

17

58.80


5.60

2.80


824.60

357

22

247.00

36.00

24.00

15.00

4.00

65.00

358

15

0.46

18.47




350.77

360

23

72.51

30.77

33.94



250.81

361

42



18.80


3.80

15.20

362

56



1.00



10.00

363

44

43.80


168.20

0.40


8.80

364

39

7.20


145-60


14.40

1070.40

365

37

43.00

22.00

1.50


0.40

10.00

366

35

32.40

26.40

18.40

18.20

8.80

169.60

369

15

33.60

36.80

0.80

27.40


351.80

370

29

64.80

684.00

1.80

6.00

3.00

16.60

371

18

20.00

4.00

40.80

7.20


504.60

372

57



44.00

18.60


2.00

375

11

3.00

154.20

69.00



246.40

376

52



34.30

11.60


38.30

377

30


20.00

1.90

12.00


1.60

378

14

55.20

116.00.

4.80



114.20

379

43



15.70

2.40

26.80

13.00

MEAN


45.19

41.15

33.60

17.13

2.59

167.11


OUTER SHELF

ST. NO.

DEP.

Sardines

Anchovies

Carangids

Scombrids

Barracudas

Other

346

72



8.20



38.80

347

61



0.10



7.70

348

77

1.04


50.40



63.70

367

68



0.40



112.80

368

66






96.20

373

81



12.20



15.00

374

84



6.60



112.80

380

61

1.80


3.00


2.40

49.80

381

76

0.40


7.90


0.60

86.80

382

76



0.60

1.20


149.40

383

82






234.00

384

68



8.00

2.00

1.00

88.40

MEAN


0.27


8.22

0.48

0.33

93.82


Venezuela.

Fishing covered the inshore fish assemblage, shrimp at intermediate depths at night and some trials for deep water shrimp in the slope down to 600m. Record of the fishing stations are shown in Annex II from st. 376 onwards. For the purpose of analysis an overlap has been made with stations east of the Orinoco delta. Table 7 shows the standardized catch rates by the broad groups for all hauls including the deep water slope. Catch rates for demersal fish are lower than in Survey I, but this is at least partly an effect of the fishing on the slope and more hauls for shrimp at night. Sharks and squid appear to be more abundant than in February.

Table 7. VENEZUELA. Catch rates for main groups in bottom trawl stations standardized to kg/hour.

ST. NO.

DEP.

Demersal

Sharks

Shrimp

Squid

Pelagic

Other

376

52

3.80

33.80



45.90

0.70

377

30

1.10




33.90

0.50

378

14

7.40

28.80

3.60


228.00

22.40

379

A3


11.40



45.30

1.20

380

61


1.40

1.00

4.80

7.60

42.20

381

76

79.60



2.80

8.90

4.40

382

76

88.50


4.80

0.60

1.80

55.50

383

82

140.80

5.60

5.60

3.20


78.80

384

68

19.20

2.00

9.00

5.60

11.00

52.60

385

67

18.80

1.00

10.20

2.40

3.80

38.00

386

17

764.20


10.00


195.20

6.20

387

43

33.00

20.00


3.00

89.00

72.80

388

22

2.20

6.40



171.00

40.80

389

8

156.00

6.00

106.50


4.30

56.60

390

401


0.71

4.59

7.06

1.41

48.53

391

511



1.90

0.50


16.60

392

399


0.20

6.30

2.00

0.20

17.85

393

271

0.26

9.00

0.26

16.94

0.79

28.15

394

202

20.60



2.20

5.00

20.10

395

507



7.50

0.30

2.80

34.40

396

403


5.70

7.80

8.10

0.30

57.90

397

606



9.80

20.40

1.50

66.00

398

382


0.50

1.20

1.90


40.60

399

77

103.00


6.20

1.00

1.50

313.50

400

58

61.50

3.30

17.50

7.20

3.00

97.20

401

56

13.20

1.60

8.20

0.40

4.80

13.60

402

13

46.80

29.60

15.00


217.80

52.00

403

52

35.60


3.20


5.20

17.20

404

37

321.00

37.20


12.40

1646.20

51.20

405

11

13.40

2.80



52.50

3.80

406

37

169.40

141.00



545.80

46.30

MEAN


67.72

11.23

7.75

3.32

107.56

45.08


Catch rates for deep water shrimp ranged up to abt. 10 kg/hour with a species of the Solenoceridae family dominating at abt. 400m and Plesiopenaeus edwardsianus at 600 m. Most of the shrimp were large sized.

At intermediate depths on the shelf shrimp catches at night ranged from 3 to 8 kg/hour and consisted of pink - and redspotted and a few brown shrimp.

Table 8 shows the catch rates for demersal fish in the shelf hauls. There were in contrast to Survey I few large catches of croakers, but the species composition was much the same as previously. Some snappers were found on the outer shelf, mainly Pristipomoides macropthalmus.

Table 9 shows the catch rates for pelagic fish by families for the shelf hauls. Scaled -and dogtooth herring and pellona dominated the Clupeids, and lookdowns the Carangids. Spanish mackerels were more abundant than in February with the spotted species most common.

Table 8. VENEZUELA. Catch rates by families for demersal fish, kg./hour.

ST. NO.

DEP.

Catfish

Croakers

Grunts

Groupers

Snappers

Other

376

52





3.80

80.40

377

30



0.30


0.80

34.40

378

14

1.80

5.60




282.80

379

43






57.90

380

61






57.00

381

76





79.60

16.10

382

76


0.30

3.00

1.20

84.00

62.70

383

82


3.20

4.80

5.60

127.20

93.20

384

68


13.80


2.40

3.00

80.20

385

67


12.60


4.80

1.40

55.40

386

17

94.00

670.20




211.40

387

43


33.00




184.80

388

22


2.20




218.20

389

8

73.20

82.80




173.40

399

77



3.50

7.00

92.50

322.20

400

58


45.60


4.80

11.10

128.20

401

56


10.80


2.00

0.40

28.60

402

13

14.00

32.80




314.40

403

52


35.20

0.40



25.60

404

37

14.60

295.40

11.00



1747.00

405

11

5.40

8.00




59.10

406

37

84.60

84.80




733.10

MEAN


13.07

61.13

1.05

1.26

18.35

232.67

Table 9. VENEZUELA. Catch rates by families for pelagic fish in pelagic and bottom trawl hauls, kg/hour.

ST. NO.

DEP.

Anchovies

Sardines

Carangids

Scombrids

Hairtails

Other

376

52



34.30

11.60


38.30

377

30

20.00


1.90

12.00


1.60

378

14

116.00

55.20

4.80


52.00

62.20

379

43



15.70

2.40

0.40

39.40

380

61


1.80

3.00


0.40

51.80

381

76


0.40

7.90



87.40

382

76



0.60

1.20


149.40

383

82






234.00

384

68



8.00

2.00


89.40

385

67



1.20

2.60


70.40

386

17


7.60

30.00


157.60

780.40

387

43


3.00

31.00

19.00


164.80

388

22

23.20

10.40

65.60

39.60


81.60

389

8

1.50


1.00


1.80

325.10

399

77


1.50




423.70

400

58



2.40



187.30

401

56






41.80

402

13

44.00

59.00

20.00

21.80

73.00

143.40

403

52


2.00



3.20

56.00

404

37

12.40

1063.40

434.00

4.40

121.00

432.80

405

11

4.90

15.40

14.80

15.80

1.60

20.00

406

37

42.50

39.10

183.80

28.80

251.60

356.70

MEAN


12.02

57.22

39.09

7.33

30.12

174.43


Annex V shows the length distributions of some of the most common species.

Figure 1. Course tracks, fishing stations and hydrographic profiles.

Figure 2. Hydrographic profiles. - WEST OF MARONI RIVER 8-10.5 1988

Figure 2. Hydrographic profiles. - EAST OF DEMERARA RIVER 14-155 1988

Figure 2. Hydrographic profiles. - ORINOCO 19.5 1988

Figure 3. Distribution of pelagic fish from acoustic system.


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