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Global Symposium on Soil Organic Carbon

Documents

Soil Organic Carbon: the hidden potential

The publication was launched at the Global Symposium on Soil Organic Carbon (GSOC) held at FAO headquarters (Rome, 21-23 March 2017). It provides an overview to decision-makers and practitioners of the main scientific facts and information regarding the current knowledge and knowledge gaps on Soil Organic Carbon. It highlights how better information and good practices may be implemented to support ending hunger, adapting to and mitigating climate change and achieving overall sustainable development.


Concept note and agenda

In the presence of climate change, land degradation and biodiversity loss, soils have become one of the most vulnerable resources in the world.1 Notwithstanding the enormous scientifc progress made to date, protection and monitoring of soil resources at national and global levels still face complicated challenges impeding effective on-the-ground policy design and implementation that varies widely from region to region. There is still insuffcient global support for the protection and sustainable management of the world’s soil resources.


Status of the World's Soil Resources

Main report

The SWSR is a reference document on the status of global soil resources that provides regional assessments of soil change. The information is based on peer-reviewed scientific literature, complemented with expert knowledge and project outputs. It provides a description and a ranking of ten major soil threats that endanger ecosystem functions, goods and services globally and in each region separately.


Status of the World's Soil Resources

Technical Summary

This document presents a summary of the first Status of the World’s Soil Resources report, the goal of which is to make clear the essential connections between human well-being and the soil. The report provides a benchmark against which our collective progress to conserve this essential resource can be measured. The report synthesizes the work of some 200 soil scientists from 60 countries.


World Soil Charter

The first World Soil Charter (WSC) was conceived and formulated, negotiated and adopted by the FAO member countries in the 1981 FAO Conference. It was a major normative instrument agreed by member states, and that the Global Soil Partnership (GSP) was duty-bound to promote its principles. The challenges faced by the world have become more evident and severe in the intervening three decades.


Voluntary Guidelines for Sustainable Soil Management

The Voluntary Guidelines for Sustainable Soil Management (VGSSM) were adopted by the 4th GSP Plenary Assembly (Rome, 25 May 2016), approved by the 25th session of the FAO Committee on Agriculture (Rome, 28 September 2016) and finally endorsed by the 155th session of the FAO Council (Rome, 5 December 2016).

These guidelines provide technical and policy recommendations on how sustainable soil management can be achieved. The successful implementation of these guidelines should pave the way to boosting soil health


Can Carbon (SOC) offset the climate change?

The relationship between climate change and soil carbon resources is of key concern to human society.