DEFINTION OF PROMISING VARIETIES
PROMISING VARIETIES FOR IRRIGATED ECOLOGY
PROMISING VARIETIES FOR RAINFED LOWLAND ECOLOGY
PROMISING VARIETIES FOR UPLAND ECOLOGY
PROMISING VARIETIES FOR TIDAL WETLAND ECOLOGY
OTHER DATABASES

INTRODUCTION

 

In West Africa, rice is the staple food crop in Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Senegal, and Sierra Leone. It is one of the top 5 foods consumed by the population in Côte D' Ivoire, Mali, Mauritania, and Nigeria. The important of rice in other countries has also increased during the recent past. As of March 1999, Burkina Faso, Benin, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Nigeria, and Senegal have implemented Special Programme for Food Security with rice crop intensification as a major component. The region has increasingly imported rice to satisfy popular demand, regardless of a production increase of about 60% during the 1987-97 period. Fortunately, considerable potential exists on the continent for expanding production into more favorable rice producing environments and increasing productivity.

 

Rice is cultivated in irrigated, rainfed lowland (inland swamps, boliland, etc..), upland and tidal wetland (or mangrove) ecologies in the region and rice yields are still low. Rice in Africa is subjected to several specific stresses found only in the continent. The Rice Yellow Mottle Virus (RYMV), the African Rice Gall Midge (ARGM), as well as the cosmopolitan rice blast, are among the major biological stresses. Other important insect pests include Diopsis and Maliarpha. Among abiotic stresses, low temperatures in Sahel zones and drought; while infertile soils and iron toxicity are prominent in humid tropical zones. For successful breeding activities, the genetic diversity of experimental materials needs to be sustained to minimize the vulnerability inherent in the growing of uniform and closely related cultivars. In Africa most National Research Programs, however, have limited access to diverse genetic materials.

 

The African wing of the International Network for Genetic Evaluation of Rice (INGER) was created in 1985 by IRRI, WARDA and IITA and based in Ibadan, Nigeria. Since April 1997, INGER has been transferred to the Germplasm Exchange Unit of WARDA Headquarters at Bouaké, Côte D' Ivoire. INGER composes 12 types of nurseries targeted on upland, irrigated, rainfed lowland and tidal wetland (or mangrove) ecosystems and biological stresses of blast and rice yellow mottle virus disease. For each ecosystem, 4 types of nurseries are composed (1) the Preliminary Screening Set, (2) the Observational Nursery, (3) the Advanced Trial and (4) Stress nurseries.

 

From 1992 to 1997, INGER distributed 3726 nursery sets to African countries. As of date, 17 WARDA member countries are participating in INGER activities. They are: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Togo. Thus, each year, considerable information is generated and collected on varietal performance and characteristics of test sites. But these information remain scattered and have never been subject to a coordinated synthesis and analysis. During 1997-98, FAO and WARDA implemented a project to collect and summarize all available agronomic information on trial results conducted from 1992 to 1997. In 1999, FAO undertook the analysis of the collected information and this forms the body of this Database.

 


The publication of this database is aimed at assisting concerned individuals and institutions in their effort to promote sustainable increased rice production in West Africa.