inPRESSive

05 Aug 2016 -
Simulation exercise Georgia
Georgia

News article concerning the simulation exercise organized by the EuFMD in Georgia

05 Aug 2016 -
Simulation exercise Georgia
Georgia

News article concerning the simulation exercise organized by the EuFMD in Georgia

05 Aug 2016 -
Simulation exercise Georgia
Georgia

News article concerning the simulation exercise organized by the EuFMD in Georgia

05 Aug 2016 -
Simulation exercise Georgia
Georgia

News article concerning the simulation exercise organized by the EuFMD in Georgia

05 Aug 2016 -
Simulation exercise Georgia
Georgia

News article concerning the simulation exercise organized by the EuFMD in Georgia

05 Aug 2016 -
Simulation exercise Georgia
Georgia

News article concerning the simulation exercise organized by the EuFMD in Georgia

28 Jun 2016 -
Viral news
New Zealand

Nepal visit gives Kiwi vets expertise to diagnose FMD A third group of Kiwi vets has seen the considerable impact FMD has on family farms in Nepal. It’s an experience which will prove essential if New Zealand ever faces an outbreak. Eleven Kiwi and one Australian vet - a mix of general practitioners, MPI and industry representatives, visited FMD-infected farms in the fertile Kathmandu Valley in May. Veterinarian Eve Pleydell, one of MPI’s Major Incident Management Team, co-ordinated the trip. She says seeing and diagnosing the actual disease will enable vets to quickly spot the signs of FMD if it did ever get into New Zealand. “MPI does as much as it can to prevent disease crossing our border, but we also need a passive surveillance system that relies on people round the country reporting suspect FMD cases as soon as they occur. It’s much easier to recognise FMD if you’ve actually seen it in the field. If we ever have an incursion and we are able to detect it within a few days it is more likely that the outbreak will be of shorter duration and less severity. Rapid detection and reporting would limit the number of people who would be directly affected, the number of animals that would have to be culled and the disruption to the New Zealand economy and way of life.”

08 Jun 2016 -
Meeting on Establishment of Sub-Regional Approach to Control of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and Other Highly Dangerous Diseases in Transcaucasia Countries
Paris

During the 84th OIE General Session and under the umbrella of EuFMD, OIE, FAO and GF-TADs a meeting for the establishment of sub-regional approach to the control of FMD and other highly dangerous diseases in the Transcaucasia countries was held on May 25, 2016. Representatives of the Russian Federation, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Turkey, Iran and European Commission participated in the meeting.The countries presented their views and opinions during the discussion of possible implementation of such sub-regional approach.Given the size of Russia, Turkey and Iran regions where the approach will be used were determined. In Russia they will include regions of Southern and North-Caucasian Federal Districts, in Turkey – provinces of Eastern Anatolia and northern regions in Iran. List of the most topical animal diseases was made that included FMD, peste-des-petits ruminants, lumpy skin disease, sheep and goat pox and African swine fever. In view of the fact that FMD endemic countries notify OIE and neighboring countries of the actual epidemic situation only twice a year representatives of a number of countries proposed to establish a regional disease notification system involving essential monthly notification of the epidemic situation changes. 

27 May 2016 -
Vet gains valuable insight
Australia/Nepal

I recently attended in Nepal a training course. I  had flown halfway across the world with 10 other Australian vets and livestock workers to a country where foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic, and we were all going to see it for the first time – the veterinary equivalent of meeting someone famous. While our main aim for being there was to help prepare Australia for the future by training with real cases of FMD, we also had to make sure we didn’t spread this highly infectious virus to any other farms in Nepal and, especially, bring it back home. 

Australia has been free of FMD since 1872, and any outbreak here would have significant impacts. 

17 May 2016 -
Australian veterinarians travel to Nepal for foot and mouth training
ABC Net

Training Australian veterinarians to fight a disease can be hard when the disease is not readily to hand.  Australia relies on being free of foot and mouth disease for market access, but it does make it hard to train animal health officers in how to manage the disease. Training Australian veterinarians to fight a disease can be hard when the disease is not readily to hand. Australia relies on being free of foot and mouth disease for market access, but it does make it hard to train animal health officers in how to manage the disease. Australia is free of foot and mouth and, as an island, has a unique ability to keep that status by maintaining strict biosecurity practices. Ensuring the future of Australian farms and export markets is partly about excluding diseases like foot and mouth, and partly about being ready to deal with possible incursions. Australian animal disease management authorities send animal health officers to Nepal, where the disease is endemic, to give face-to-face experience in handling the disease.

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Interview

A vet back from the training course in Nepal describes the course.

ab.co/201hlpk

and on You Tube