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Last update: 14 October 2004

Situation Report - up to 13 October 2004

1. Emergency Centre for Locust Operations (ECLO)

In August 2004, FAO re-established the Emergency Centre for Locust Operations (ECLO) based at FAO headquarters, in order to strengthen its response to the locust upsurge. ECLO continually monitors the locust situation and is the focal point for assistance to locust-affected countries.

For the last few months, almost all the locusts have been concentrated in West and Northwest Africa (the Western Region). The situation has, since March, remained calm in the Sudan and the other countries around the Red Sea (the Central Region).

ECLO works closely with the FAO Commission for controlling the Desert Locust in the Western Region (called in French the “Commission FAO de lutte contre le criquet pèlerin dans la région occidentale” CLCPRO) which is responsible for coordination of locust activities in nine front-line countries.

ECLO maintains a regular dialogue with the international donor community. Priorities for assistance are based on information provided almost every day by National Locust Control Units and Plant Protection Services, supplemented by reports from FAO’s country representatives, and advice from FAO consultants in the field.

For funds routed through FAO, ECLO takes action to implement the individual projects, providing the agreed inputs, often involving flying hours, pesticides, operating costs, equipment, environmental monitoring and technical advice. ECLO also collects bilateral assistance, with a view to coordinating inputs and avoiding duplication of effort. .

2. Early Alert and Funding

In October 2003, FAO issued a first Alert through its Desert Locust Information Service (DLIS) that outbreaks were occurring in Mauritania, Niger, and Sudan, and that Mali was also of concern. Morocco and Algeria were warned that locusts could arrive from the south. DLIS has the permanent function of being the global centre on Desert Locust information. Even during periods of calm, DLIS continues to monitor the situation and issues monthly Bulletins which include forecasts for the following six weeks.

In February 2004, FAO called an emergency meeting of all its locust staff from the field and from headquarters to review the situation and estimate needs to combat the growing locust infestation. On 23 February 2004, the first appeal to donors was issued estimating US$9 million as the requirement for Mauritania (US$6 million) and for Chad, Mali and Niger (US$3 million).

On 10 March 2004, FAO organized a meeting in Rome with donors, to discuss preventive action against locust breeding and how to avert a plague. Participants were advised that “a stitch in time would save nine” in the cost of control and damage to food security and economic growth. It was mentioned that the last plague, which took place from 1987 to 1989, had cost US$300 million of donor funding combined with an unquantified but substantial amount of inputs by the locust-affected countries.

On 8 April 2004, as the situation was evolving rapidly, FAO’s Director-General invited donors to a second meeting in order to keep them informed on needs that by then had risen to US$17 million. It was emphasized that, unless funding was made available quickly, the cost of combating the locust would rise dramatically. Only a handful of donors responded to this statement: the United States of America (USA), US$0.8 million and Norway US$143 350, amounting to less than US$1 million altogether.

On 24 May 2004, the Director-General wrote to the nine Member States of the FAO Commission for controlling the Desert Locust in the Western Region, CLCPRO, (Algeria, Chad, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Senegal and Tunisia) drawing their attention to the seriousness of the situation and the need for collective, coordinated action. A follow-up letter was sent in June 2004.

The first Executive Committee of the CLCPRO met in Niamey, Niger, from 16 to 20 June 2004 and action plans for the summer campaign for the Sahelian Members States of the Commission were prepared.

On 7 July 2004, the Director-General sent a letter to all Heads of State and Government of the traditional and potential new donor countries, as well as to relevant development banks and the European Commission, warning of the serious worsening of the locust upsurge and that the need for assistance had risen to US$30 million.

Algeria hosted a ministerial-level meeting of the nine countries of CLCPRO on 27 July 2004. In the meeting, the action plans for the Sahelian countries were expanded to reflect the deterioration in the locust situation and contingency plans were also prepared for the next winter/spring campaign in the countries of North-West Africa.

By late July 2004 - when the needs had risen to US$83 million - and in August and September 2004, when the needs had risen to US$100 million, the donors started to react in a substantive way. A positive response to the Director-General’s letter came from Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, the United Kingdom and the United States of America (USA), as well as the African Development Bank (AfDB), Islamic Development Bank and the Arab Organization for Agricultural Development (AOAD). However, these were not received all at the same time: as late as 17 September 2004, only US$24 million were pledged and only US$4 million had arrived in FAO’s bank account.

On 30 and 31 August 2004, the Senegalese Government convened a meeting in Dakar of the Ministers of Agriculture of the CLCPRO countries as well as Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau and Guinea, to follow up on the meeting held earlier in Algiers on 27 July 2004. It was agreed to intensify the fight against Desert Locust by coordinating the expertise and means within the CLCPRO and by adopting a strategy to implement the operational plan of action developed in Algiers.

FAO organized a third donor meeting on 17 September 2004 in Rome during which the Director-General made an appeal to donors to raise their pledge for the upsurge and expedite the transfer of funds to FAO account.

As of 13 October 2004, FAO had provided a total of US$6 million from its own limited resources. Donors have approved US$57.9 million while a total of US$19.9 million have been received by FAO from Canada, United States of America, Japan, United Kingdom, Netherlands, African Development Bank, Norway, France and Italy. Another US$9.9 million is now in the pipeline .

The countries and organizations which have transferred their contributions to FAO’s bank account are: Canada US$5 million; USA US$3.3 million; Japan US$3 million; United Kingdom US$2.7 million; Netherlands US$2.4 million; African Development Bank US$2 million; Norway US$ 642 000; Italy US$370 000; France US$363 000; UNDP US$48 000. Including FAO’s own Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) US$6 million. This totals US$25.8 million including FAO and without FAO, US$19.8 million.

List of countries and organizations from which funds will be arriving (i.e. project approved but funds not yet received): European Union US$30.3 million; Kingdom of Saudi Arabia US$3 million; International Fund Agricultural Development (IFAD) US$1.4 million; Islamic Development Bank US$1 million; USA US$600 000; Austria US$480 000; France US$370 000, Italy US$360,000; Luxembourg US$240 000; Australia US$215 000 and; the Arab Organization for Agricultural Development US$60 000, for a total of US$38 million.

Additional negotiations are in the final stage with the following donors: France US$4.8 million; IFAD US$1.5 million; Germany US$1.2 million; Sweden US$900 000; Belgium US$532 000; Italy US$720 000 and; the Agence Intergouvernementale de la Francophonie US$240 000, for a total of US$9.9 million.

To protect the crops and pasture in the Sahel countries and to protect Northwest Africa this winter and in the following spring, donors need to accelerate urgently the flow of resources to locust-affected countries and commit additional funds.

Significant damage has been reported in the Sahelian countries but it is too early to quantify losses. A joint FAO/World Food Programme (WFP) Crop and Food Supply Assessment Mission (CFSAM) started in Niger and Mali on 1 October 2004 and in Burkina Faso (9 October) and in Guinea-Bissau (10 October). The « Comité permanent Inter-Etats de lutte contre la sécheresse dans le Sahel » (CILSS) will join the assessment team. Together, they will carry out field visits in nine affected countries (Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Chad, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal). The mission is taking place before the end of the main harvest to allow a thorough assessment of the crop losses and the needs for food and agricultural assistance. The results of the mission will be available in November 2004.

3. Coordination with other partners

FAO is working closely with the international community and has established a Regional Emergency Locust Operations Coordination Unit in Dakar to promote regional coordination and ensure best possible use of available resources. This unit works in the framework of the CLCPRO and cooperates closely with affected countries and donor representatives. It coordinates closely with the FAO representatives in the Sahelian countries. It will also contribute to the assessment of damage caused by the locust upsurge to the agricultural and livestock sector.

An Inter-Agency Standing Committee meeting on the locust crisis was held on 29 September 2004, under the chairmanship of Mr. Jan Egeland, the Under Secretary General and Head of the Office of Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). This meeting involved several United Nations’ partners based in the Sahel region, New York, Geneva, Rome and Washington D.C. Several non-governmental organizations also participated. The Central Emergency Revolving Fund (CERF) of the United Nations has assisted FAO in advancing funds for ongoing activities.

4. Information sharing

FAO provides operational information on its locust web site at the following address: http://www.fao.org/news/global/locusts/locuhome.htm (click on “ Assistance provided”). The web page provides donors’ funding updates on a daily basis and a weekly update of the Situation Report. The web page also informs the affected countries and the donor community of the main meetings and issues that are of interest to them.

5. Assistance

Assistance through FAO has been provided to Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Chad, Eritrea, Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Senegal, Sudan and Yemen. Assistance will also be provided to Tunisia. In addition, each affected country has contributed substantially to the locust campaign.

North African countries from the CLCPRO have been extremely supportive to their southern neighbours Algeria, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia, have donated and lent pesticides as well as made available survey and control teams, aircraft and the necessary fuel, vehicles and related equipment to combat the locusts.

5.1 Control Operations

It is recognized that during upsurges, pesticides will have to be used to protect crops and rangeland. FAO promotes best practice methods to reduce risks to human and animal health and the environment. It takes measures to ensure monitoring of the effects on human health and the environment and to avoid the build-up of obsolete pesticide stocks. FAO is also implementing field trials with more environmentally friendly compounds, including bio-pesticides.

5.2 Inputs

5.2.1 Pesticides

664 350 litres of pesticide have been delivered and 852 400 litres have been ordered for urgent delivery. Additional orders will be placed against an advance tender issued for 1.5 million litres of pesticide (of which 398,600 litres have already been ordered and includeded in the 852 400 litres above).

France provided FAO with an aircraft to enable the transportation of pesticides that Algeria lent to FAO for delivery to Mauritania (12 450 litres) and to Senegal (6 750 litres). Morocco also lent to FAO 48 900 litres for Mauritania and 31 000 litres for Senegal. These were transported by a plane put at FAO’s disposal by the World Food Programme (WFP) and funded by Italy. All the pesticides mentioned herewith were delivered between 26 and 28 September 2004. FAO is now replenishing the Algerian and Moroccan loans.

5.2.2 Aircraft

Two aircraft have been hired for locust control in Mauritania and two more for Mali. Three contracts have been issued for the provision of six aircraft: one for Chad, two for Mauritania, one for Niger and two for Senegal. FAO is in the process of contracting helicopters for Niger, Mauritania and Senegal.

5.2.3 Human resources

Nine international experts (logisticians, plant protection and environmental specialists) have been fielded to Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal to support each government’s locust control teams, including assessments of the impact on the environment and health In addition, five regional staff have been posted in the Regional Emergency locust operation unit in Dakar, Senegal.

5.2.4 Equipment

Funds have also been provided for surveying, safety and communications equipment, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), spraying equipment, pumps, vehicles, and for field offices’ budgets and general operating expenses such as fuel, vehicle rental, and daily subsistence allowances for survey and control teams.

5.2.5 Operational advice and monitoring

Governments are deploying locust and plant protection teams to survey and control the locust situation as well as to monitor the control operations and assess their impact on the humane health and environment. As mentioned earlier, FAO is supporting these national teams by providing logisticians, plant protection and environmental specialists.

5.2.6 Environment

In Mauritania, Morocco and Niger, environmental experts have assisted national control units in improving treatment methods with respect to human and ecological safety, as well as good practice (selective treatments, disposal of contaminated materials, etc.). Similar technical assistance will be provided to Mali and Senegal. In-campaign monitoring has been carried out in Mauritania and Morocco, in order to assess the environmental risks and the quality of the treatments. It has also started in Senegal on 28 September 2004.

5.2.7 Ensurance of best practice in chemicals management

FAO is purchasing exclusively pesticides that are registered in the countries concerned for the control of locusts and that were also evaluated by the Pesticide Referee Group (an independent advisory body for Locust control) as being efficacious against the Desert Locust and acceptable with respect to environmental risks. Delivered pesticides and their containers including labels, have to strictly comply with FAO and WHO standards. All deliveries are inspected.

5.2.8 Promotion of alternatives of pesticides

In collaboration with the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA) and International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), ECLO is involved in large-scale testing of two major biological methods. The tests will take place in October 2004, in Mauritania under field conditions. If the results confirm the potential efficacy demonstrated at small scale, the products will be included in the campaigns supported by FAO.

5.2.9 Training

In-service training of plant protection staff has started in Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal. Training includes the implementation of locust survey and control operations, especially the correct application of pesticides. Staff are also shown how to collect, transfer and manage the large volume of data resulting from all the ongoing locust emergency activities.

In Sudan, Yemen and the other countries mentioned above, personnel will be trained in best practice spraying techniques that minimize environmental impact and the contamination of the spray operator.

In all countries, the operators’ health is checked at regular intervals.

6. Specific Country Assistance

6.1. The Sahelian Countries

Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal are currently the countries most severely affected by the Desert Locust upsurge. To a lesser extent, Burkina Faso and Cape Verde Islands are also concerned. Since March 2004, FAO assistance has been provided through its TCP and donor funding.

Using the cash on hand from donors, assistance is currently being provided for US$19.9 million to assist governments in implementing and strengthening the locust survey and control operations. However, to face the current serious locust upsurge, substantive additional assistance will be provided in the next few months, thanks to recent donor support through FAO.

Assistance provided to the Sahelian countries:

6.1.1 BURKINA FASO

A) Inputs

Burkina Faso has received funding to cover expenses related to national consultants, training and general operating expenses.

B) Bilateral information

The Government has gathered approximately 40 000 litres of pesticides through bilateral contributions.

6.1.2 CAPE VERDE

Funding has been made available for training and local operating expenses.

6.1.3 CHAD

A) Inputs

Pesticides: Chad has received 40 000 litres of pesticides and will receive some additional 25 000 litres during this month.

Aircraft: FAO is hiring one aircraft and is currently looking into the possibility of hiring an helicopter.

Human resources: One logistician has been fielded to assist the Government in the control operations.

Equipment: Funding has been provided to support the national locust survey and control teams.

B) Bilateral information

Algeria donated 10 000 litres of pesticides, 100 sprayers and 100 kits of protection. Libya donated 5 000 litres of pesticides and made available two aircraft and five Land Cruisers, three of which mounted with sprayers.

Other in-kind donations such as pesticides and equipment came from Sudan. Spain is planning to transport pesticides (quantities unknown) with their own air force aircraft. The local United Nations (UN) family made available a total of nine vehicles and UNDP provided for one million FCFA (or US$1 900). France contributed US$370 000 and has made available its military aircraft to transport pesticides and equipment to Abéché.

The International Development Agency (IDA) provided 1 200 litres of petrol. The World Bank announced a credit of US$2.1 million.

C) National inputs

Chad is providing substantial resources both in cash and in-kind for its locust campaign.

6.1.4 THE GAMBIA

A) Inputs

The Gambia has received five vehicles for locust survey. In addition, money was made available to support the national survey and control teams.

B) Bilateral information

The World Bank announced a credit of US$0.9 million.

6.1.5 MALI

A) Inputs

Pesticides: Mali received a total of 101 800 litres of pesticides and some 116 800 additional litres will be delivered within the next few weeks.

Aircraft: Two aircraft are now operational (240 flying hours); ground logistics are carried out by national teams.

Human resources: FAO assists the Government in the organization of control operations by fielding two international logisticians; a national consultant has also been recruited to assist in the locust campaign.

Equipment: Funding has been provided for support to aerial spraying, control equipment and national locust teams.

Environment: A US-funded team ensures the environmental monitoring of the campaign. Data are not yet available.

B) Bilateral information

Algeria donated 49 750 litres of pesticides, 100 protection kits and 100 knapsack sprayers. It has also provided, on loan, 30 000 litres of pesticides. Algeria also made available six survey and control teams equipped with 18 vehicles.

Libya donated 19 600 litres of pesticides and gave, on loan, 10 000 litres of pesticides. Libya made available two aircraft, 12 vehicles and fielded three survey and control teams. Morocco and Tunisia provided 5 000 litres of pesticides respectively.

The Economic Community of West Africa States (ECOWAS) provided 10 million FCFA or US$18 800 while the West African Bank of Development (WABD) pledged 20 million FCFA (or US$37 600). The Netherlands and the German Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) have announced pledges of US$600 000 and US$100 000, respectively.

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has also contributed locally. WFP, UNICEF and Care have loaned vehicles. Spain is planning to transport pesticides (quantities unknown) with their own air force aircraft.

The USA is providing one helicopter while the World Bank has made available ten vehicles mounted with sprayers and provided funds to hire three aircraft. It has also announced a credit of US$1.9 million. South Africa provided two Turbo Trush aircraft and will provide a total of 135 000 litres of pesticides by mid-October.

C) National inputs

Mali is providing substantial resources both in cash and in-kind for its locust campaign.

6.1.6 MAURITANIA

A) Inputs

Pesticides: Mauritania has received 339 700 litres of pesticides. Additional 336 450 litres of pesticides will be delivered within the next weeks.

Aircraft: Two aircraft have arrived for survey and control operations for 360 flying hours of survey and control operations. Two more aircraft will arrive on 14 October 2004 while two helicopters are being hired for locust control.

Human resources: A logistician has been fielded for two weeks. A dedicated team, trained and equipped by FAO is carrying out the monitoring of sprayer safety and quality control. The multilateral funding also covers the operational costs of the Algerian and Moroccan teams carrying out survey and control operations.

Equipment: Vehicles, sprayers, radios, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), measuring, testing and other field supplies have been delivered.

Environment: Only five cases have been detected of slight reduction of blood cholinesterase, an indication that the safety of the spray teams is generally well protected. No serious environmental effects have been observed.

B) Bilateral information

In August 2004, Algerian donated 15 000 litres of pesticides, 100 knapsack sprayers and 100 protective kits. On 26 September 2004, the Algerian government gave on loan to FAO for Mauritania 12 450 litres of pesticides. These were delivered on an aircraft made available by France to FAO. The latter will replenish the Algerian pesticide loan by mid-October 2004. Algeria made available six survey and control teams equipped with vehicles, spraying material and other field supplies.

In August, Morocco donated 50 000 litres of pesticides. On the 27 and the 28 of September 2004, Morocco gave on loan to FAO for Mauritania 50 000 litres of pesticides. They arrived on the aircraft put at FAO’s disposal by WFP and funded by Italy. FAO will be replenishing the Moroccan pesticide loan by mid-October 2004. The Government also made available three aircraft (type PA25) for 310 flying hours; two survey and control teams and six equipped vehicles. It also donated the necessary fuel for the three aircraft, ten vehicles, ten sprayers, six pumps and three generators.

Senegal has fielded three vehicles to accompany the Senegalese survey and control team. The Gambia has also fielded support teams. Other bilateral contributions include a confirmed donation by France for 100 000 Euros to buy four vehicles and two radios. Spain has announced a contribution of 500 000 Euros and the European Union has ordered material (including five5 vehicles) worth 360 000 Euros. On 23 September 2004, the World Bank announced a credit of US$2 million while the Arab Organization for Agricultural Development (AOAD) has transferred US$10 000 to the Ministry of Agriculture.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) announced that the Government approved US$3.2 million for immediate assistance to allow a cross-border aerial campaign. Six aircraft have already arrived in Senegal with 200 000 litres of pesticides and logistical equipment, to conduct operations not only there but also in Mauritania (and potentially in Mali).

C) National inputs

Mauritania is providing substantial resources both in cash and in-kind for its locust campaign.

6.1.7 NIGER

A) Inputs

Pesticides: Niger has received 21 650 litres of pesticides and 75 000 litres will be received within the next few weeks.

Aircraft: FAO is hiring one fixed-wing aircraft and one helicopter.

Human resources: FAO assists the Government in the control operations and donor coordination through an international consultant. An international logistician has been fielded until 7 October 2004 while a second logistician will replace him. Two environmentalists have been fielded to assist the national teams in monitoring the control operations and their impact on environment and human health. A national consultant has been recruited to support the Ministry in data management. Funding has been provided for support to national locust control teams and control equipment.

B) Bilateral information

Algeria donated 15 000 litres of pesticides, 100 knapsack sprayers and 100 protection kits. The country made available three national survey and control teams while Morocco and Tunisia donated 5 000 litres of pesticides respectively.

The Donors’ Common Fund contribution is due to reach 86 million FCFA (US$820 000) in addition to the 65 000 litres of pesticides which were donated. The Central Bank of West African States (BCEAO) donated 25 million FCFA (or US$46 800). The West African Bank of Development (WABD) and ECOWAS have donated 20 million FCFA (US$37 600) and 10 million FCFA (or US$18 000), respectively while the World Bank announced a credit of US$2 million.

C) National inputs

Niger is substantially contributing to the locust campaign by providing cash and in-kind assistance.

6.1.8 SENEGAL

A) Inputs

Pesticides: Senegal has received 63 400 litres of pesticides and will receive 153 550 litres within the next few weeks.

Aircraft: FAO is placing orders for two aircraft and one helicopter.

Human resources: The Government is being assisted in the control operations by an international FAO Logistician.

Equipment: Funding has been provided for support to national locust control teams and control equipment.

Environment: Improvement of treatment methods with respect to human and ecological safety as well as good practice (selective treatments, disposal).

B) Bilateral information

Algeria fielded one spraying team and loaned to FAO for Senegal 6 750 litres of pesticides. They arrived on an aircraft that France had put at FAO’s disposal.

On 28 September 2004, the Government of Morocco loaned to FAO for Senegal 31 000 litres of pesticides; they arrived on the aircraft put at FAO’s disposal by WFP and funded by Italy. FAO will be replenishing both the Algerian and Moroccan pesticide loans by mid-October 2004. Morocco made available two treatment aircraft for 45 days.

Libya donated 20 000 litres of pesticides and fielded six survey and control teams. It has also provided three vehicles mounted with spraying equipments and three vehicles while the Gambia has also fielded a support team to Senegal.

A Brazilian military aircraft arrived in Dakar on 6 October 2004 transporting a fumigation aircraft donated to the Government. The Brazilians are also making the military aircraft (Hercule C-130) available to FAO for possible pesticide transport operations in the Sahel region, should operational modalities be feasible to arrange before mid-October .

France and Spain pledged respectively 100 000 and 500 000 Euros while the Arab Bank for Economic Development in Africa (BADEA) pledged US$111 000 and the West African Bank of Development (WADB) pledged 20 million FCFA or US$37 600. The World Bank announced a credit of US$2 million.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) announced that the Government approved US$3.2 million for immediate assistance to allow a cross-border aerial campaign. Six aircraft have already arrived in Senegal with 200 000 litres of pesticides and logistical equipment, to conduct operations not only there but also in Mauritania (and potentially in Mali).

C) National inputs

Senegal is providing substantial resources both in cash and in-kind for its locust campaign.


6.2 North and North West Africa countries

6.2.1 ALGERIA

A) Inputs

Algeria has received GPS, radios and support to the national control teams.

B) Bilateral information

The AOAD has transferred US$10 000 to the Ministry of Agriculture and the Government of Spain is planning to transport pesticides with its own air forces aircraft (quantities unknown at this time).

C) National inputs

Algeria is spending large sums on locust prevention and control.

6.2.2 MOROCCO

A) Inputs

Pesticides: Morocco has received 11 000 litres of pesticides and another 3 000 litres will arrive by mid-October 2004.

Equipment: Some radios, GPS, safety equipment, sprayers and spaying equipment have been received. In addition, the multilateral funding comprises of support to the national locust control teams, control equipment and other local operating expenses.

Environment: The environmental study by the FAO expert is to be continued. Preliminary data indicate that while treatments are not always carried out correctly (under dosing), no serious health or environmental problems occur.

B) Bilateral information

Spain has pledged two bilateral operations in two phases for a total amount of 2.3million Euros.

C) National inputs

Morocco is spending large sums on locust prevention and control.

6.3 Central countries

6.3.1 ERITREA

Eritrea received sprayers to be mounted and 15 000 litres of pesticides (arrived at Massawa port on 26 September 2004). Support to the national control teams has also been made available.

6.3.2 SUDAN

A) Inputs

Sudan has received radios, GPS, and support to the national control teams. It has also received assistance for monitoring of the environmental impact, aerial surveillance and for renovations of airstrips for locust control.

B) Bilateral information

The AOAD has transferred US$10 000 to the Ministry of Agriculture.

6.3.3 YEMEN

Yemen has received radios with accessories, GPS and 15 000 litres of pesticides (arrived at Hoddeidah port). Support to the national control teams has also been made available.


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