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SKETCHING IMPACTS OF THE TSUNAMI ON PADDY FIELDS
 

Machilipatnam area, Andhra Pradesh. 18 Dec (left) and 27 Dec (right)

SKETCHING IMPACTS OF THE TSUNAMI ON PADDY FIELDS

Machilipatnam area, Andhra Pradesh. 18 Dec (left) and 27 Dec (right)


 

Situation C

Situation B

Situation A

Stream Velocity

High velocity of the front wave and recession front provoking erosion and scouring.
Possible destruction of bunds

Medium velocity

Low velocity

Duration of flood

Several hours for well drained lands to several days and weeks for poorly drained fields.

Intermediate

Minimum drainage to nearby field

Salinization due to infiltration

Limited to only few millimetres of salted water for well drained areas.

High for long duration of inundation (A value of 5 to 10 mm of infiltration per day might be consider for paddyfield considering the usual values of deep percolation below the puddled layer)

Sediment deposit

Salted deposit thickness can reach up to 30 cm. Part of the initial deposit can also be eroded during rapid recession flows if the area is well drained.

Salted deposit thickness can reach up to 30 cm.

Low deposit due to low water depth.

High deposit where inundation lasts.


example of high vulnerable area: coastal paddyfields bordeing saline lowlands (on the right)

less vulnerable area further upstram


example of possible zonation of affected areas

example of possible zonation of affected areas


  • Sever damage to fishing ports, roads, bridges and public utilities.
  • A preliminary estimate from the Government is that the flooding caused damage amounting to US$30 million.
  • Coastal farms and the artisanal fishing sector suffered extensively. A great number of fishing vessels were damaged or lost. The two fish processing plants and cold storage facilities located in the Fishing Port in Victoria were also affected
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