Agroecology Knowledge Hub

Co-creation and sharing of knowledge: agricultural innovations respond better to local challenges when they are co-created through participatory processes

Agroecology depends on context-specific knowledge. It does not offer fixed prescriptions – rather, agroecological practices are tailored to fit the environmental, social, economic, cultural and political context. The co-creation and sharing of knowledge plays a central role in the process of developing and implementing agroecological innovations to address challenges across food systems including adaptation to climate change.

Through the co-creation process, agroecology blends traditional and indigenous knowledge, producers’ and traders’ practical knowledge, and global scientific knowledge. Producer’s knowledge of agricultural biodiversity and management experience for specific contexts as well as their knowledge related to markets and institutions are absolutely central in this process.

Education – both formal and non-formal – plays a fundamental role in sharing agroecological innovations resulting from co-creation processes. For example, for more than 30 years, the horizontal campesino a campesino movement has played a pivotal role in sharing agroecological knowledge, connecting hundreds of thousands of producers in Latin America. In contrast, top-down models of technology transfer have had limited success.

Promoting participatory processes and institutional innovations that build mutual trust enables the co-creation and sharing of knowledge, contributing to relevant and inclusive agroecology transition processes.

Database

In Cambodia, small-scale farmers are facing the issue of low economic returns from their rice farming because of low productivity and high input costs. The system of rice intensification (SRI) allows farmers to use less inputs. In dry areas, SRI could result in an average yield of 3.6 tonnes/ha, while...
Cambodia
Innovation
2018
As support for agroecology grows around the world, an urgent question spanning our field’sscientific, practical, and movement dimensions is how agroecology can “scale” to includemorepeople in more places in fair, sustainable food systems. Our challenge is to seize this opportunitywhile pushing back against the tendency to strip agroecology of its...
Journal article
2019
This article is the Preface of the virtual issue Agroecological Engineering, published in the journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development (www.springer.com/journal/13593) of the French National Institute of Agricultural Research (http://www.inra.fr/en). "Bring diversity back to agriculture. That's what made it work in the first place." David R. Brower.
Journal article
2015
Biowatch advocates for agroecology as a proven, multi-faceted approach to creating a sustainable, diverse, just food system that applies ecological principles and methods to farming, while addressing wider environmental, economic, social, cultural, and political dimensions in order to transform the industrialised food system.
South Africa
Book
2016
The Map of Agroecology Knowledge and Practice is a technological platform that allows the mapping and exchange of Agroecological experiences in order to bring people (in every nook and cranny, from the countryside to the city), to strengthen, and create new networks of collaboration that enhance the sharing of real...
Website
2019