Biodiversity

Global Dialogue on the role of food and agriculture in the Post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework

The Food and Agriculture Organization, in collaboration with the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, will hold a Global Dialogue on the Role of Food and Agriculture in the Global Biodiversity Framework and its High-level Segment. This event will raise awareness of ongoing international policy processes on biodiversity and position the agriculture sectors as key contributors to the sustainable management and custodianship of biodiversity.

FAO is fully committed to promoting sustainable practices that are biodiversity friendly and deliver healthy food and prosperity for all, while preserving our natural resources.

Outputs from these meetings will feed into discussions on the development of the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework and the 15th Session of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity to be held in Kunming, China, next October 2021 (COP15).

FLICKR ALBUMS

Day 1
Day 1

PRESENTATIONS

Why is biodiversity key for agriculture and vice versa?

One third of the terrestrial land surface is used for cropping or animal husbandry
Food and agriculture sectors play an important role for the sustainable use, enhancement, conservation and restoration of biodiversity as a whole and vice versa – the conservation of biodiversity is critical in sustaining these sector
Sustainable agricultural practices offer the largest contribution for biodiversity conservation in productive landscapes and aquatic ecosystems outside dedicated protected areas
Biodiversity contributes to food security and nutrition as well as many rural livelihoods
Forestry, fisheries and aquaculture, crop and livestock agriculture can be part of the solution towards biodiversity conservation
Farmers, livestock keepers, forest dwellers and fisherfolk are the main managers and custodians of biodiversity
Indigenous peoples manage over 40 percent of the planet’s protected areas and a similar proportion of its ecologically intact landscapes