72 Partnerships for sustainable livestock development

The Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock and the Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance Partnership in support of food security and nutrition

Organizers: Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock; Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) partnership

Abstract

The side event will provide an opportunity to present how stakeholders from the livestock sector are working in partnerships to address development issues and to contribute to food security and nutrition. Livestock is one of the fastest growing sectors in developing countries. Producing more to supply a large increase of demand by 2050 while benefiting to all and reducing negative environmental impacts is the biggest challenge the sector had to face. The Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock is composed of a wide range of organizations from the public and private sectors, NGOs, social movements and CBOs, research/ academia and intergovernmental organizations. It aims to facilitate global dialogue, share knowledge and promote local practice and policy change. The Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance partnership, working as an Action Network of the Global Agenda, produces methodologies, guidelines and metrics that are used as a reference by stakeholders in the sector to monitor their performances and reduce their impact on the environment. Partners will present both initiatives, their ways of working as multi-stakeholder partnerships and their most recent achievements.

Key speakers

Fritz Schneider (Chair of the Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock)

Camillo De Camillis (Manager of the Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance LEAP Partnership)

Michael and Marguerite Crowley (Farmers in the Carbery Greener Dairy Farms Initiative, Ireland)

Jean-Baptiste Dollé (Chief of the Environment Department at Idele, French Livestock Institute, France)

Ivannia Quesada Villalobos (Vice-Minister of the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, Costa Rica)

Thomas Cherenet (Adviser of the Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries, Ethiopia)

Khalid Khawaldeh (Pastoralists representative, World Alliance of Mobile Indigenous Peoples)

Summary

This side event presented how stakeholders from the livestock sector are working in partnerships to address development issues and contribute to food security and nutrition. It provided evidence on how to achieve practice improvement on the ground.

The Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock is a multi-stakeholder partnership composed of a wide range of organizations from the public and private sectors, NGOs, social movements and community based organizations, academia and intergovernmental organizations. It facilitates global dialogue, shares knowledge and promotes local practice and policy change.
Due to the proliferation of environmental assessment methods, it is not an easy task calculating what the baseline scenario performance is as well as measuring progress towards the Agenda 2030 targets.

The Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership is working as an Action Network of the Global Agenda to improve the environmental performance of livestock supply chains, while considering both economic and social viability of the sector. LEAP builds up consensus on environmental assessment methodologies, guidelines, metrics and data that are used as a reference by stakeholders to generate evidence for environmental management and policy dialogue.

Summary of key points

This event demonstrated how multi-stakeholder initiatives such as the Global Agenda can make a difference in setting up inclusive sustainable development pathways for joint and cohesive action that tackles united the sustainability challenges.

Irish farmers from the Carbery Greener Dairy Farms™ initiative showcased a concrete application of LEAP guidelines. Measurements are taken at farm level while extension services process conduct assessments according to identify suitable actions leading to both environmental and economic benefits. Farmers showed how their income has been growing over the past years and manifested trust on the work that Ireland is doing with FAO through the LEAP Partnership.

A similar co-benefit approach currently being adopted on-voluntary basis in France was presented. LEAP guidelines are being used in support of two low-carbon farming initiatives involving circa 4,000 dairy farms and 2,000 beef farms. Through application of LEAP guidelines, improvement options are being identified and greenhouse gas emissions substantially cut.
Costa Rica was shown as front runner in this field. The building blocks of the low-carbon livestock strategy initiative enforced in 140 farms in Costa Rica were illustrated.

The event presented the sustainability challenges faced by Ethiopia and pastoralists. While Ethiopia is supporting agri-business to boost trade, pastoralists are often suffering from land privatization, which prevents their mobility and threaten their livelihood.

Key outcomes/take away messages

Many are the production practices in agriculture. Therefore, different are the pathways towards sustainable food and agriculture, as highlighted in the latest COAG session. All farmers and livestock producers need to measure their performance over time. Otherwise, extension services need to take measurements on behalf of farmers. This is the only way to track progress towards SDGs.

Each production system requires dedicated policy discussion. Pastoral systems cannot be compared with intensive, industrial systems

Researchers have to work close with extension services and farmers in order to boost practice improvement. Education and training of farmers play a key role.

Public policies establishing environmental improvement programs for feed and livestock farming systems need to be discussed and agreed with farmers upfront in order to facilitate enforcement.