12 Contributing to sustaining peace and conflict prevention: perspectives from agriculture, food security and nutrition.

Exploring the wider role of food security and nutrition related interventions that save lives, save livelihoods and create longer-term resilience - contributions to sustaining peace and conflict prevention.

Organizers

  • Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN, Rome
  • World Food Programme, Rome
  • Quakers UN Office, Geneva
  • Permanent Representation of the Netherlands to the Rome-based Agencies, Rome (tbc)

Abstract

There is a renewed international and UN-wide focus on conflict prevention, and Agenda 2030 sees achievement of all SDGs as critical elements in achieving the further goal of peaceful and inclusive societies. This side-event will explore the linkages between food security and nutrition (FSN), agriculture and sustaining peace. FSN and related livelihood interventions play a critical role in protecting and saving lives and livelihoods and strengthening resilience in conflict situations. However, FSN and related livelihood interventions can also play an important role in sustaining peace, and in directly preventing conflict, through a number of different pathways. Some of these are explored in the SOFI 2017 report on ‘Building Resilience for Peace and Food Security’, and are referenced in the 2015 CFS Framework For Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crises (CFS-FFA). The panel discussion will focus on how investments in building resilience can help reduce specific conflict drivers (e.g. food insecurity and malnutrition, rural poverty, climate change impacts, natural resource competition, and rural youth unemployment), and how such investments can help build resilience to conflict by assisting countries and households to prevent, anticipate, prepare for, cope with and recover from conflicts. Practical examples and field experiences will be used to illustrate these arguments.

Key speakers/presenters

  • H.E. Ambassador Johannes Petrus Hoogeveen, Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the UN Organizations for Food and Agriculture
  • Ms Mira Karybaeva, Deputy Head of the President’s Office of the Kyrgyz Republic, Department of Ethnic, Religious Policies and Interaction with Civil Society  
  • Dr Florian Krampe, Researcher, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI)
  • Ms Nora Meier, Consultant, Quakers UN Office (QUNO)
  • Mr Zlatan Milisic, Deputy Director, Policy & Programme Division, World Food Programme (WFP)
  • Mr Dominique Burgeon, Director Emergency and Rehabilitation Division, Strategic Programme Leader – Resilience, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
  • Ms Rebecca Richards, Chief, Emergencies and Transitions, World Food Programme (WFP)

Summary

There is a renewed international and UN-wide focus on conflict prevention, and Agenda 2030 sees achievement of all SDGs as critical elements in achieving the further goal of peaceful and inclusive societies. This side-event explored the linkages between investments in food security and nutrition, agriculture and their contributions to sustaining peace. The panel discussion focused on how building resilience can help reduce specific conflict drivers (e.g. climate change, natural resource competition, and rural youth unemployment), and how we can build resilience to conflict by assisting countries and households to prevent, anticipate, prepare for, cope with and recover from conflicts.

1.    Ms. Mira Karybaeva
To sustain peace and prevent conflict, we should focus both on strengthening national governments to develop programmes, whilst also ensuring local-level ownership these programmes.

2.    Dr. Florian Krampe
We should begin to focus more on opportunity, less on risk. It is important to study the positive, not to only focus on the negative, such that we can scale-up and replicate the positive.

3.    Ms. Nora Meier
It is critical to build “networks of trust” among local populations, inter- and intra-community – building strong social relationships that can help to prevent the rise of conflict.

4.    Mr. Zlatan Milisic
We need to begin exploring more prevention as a means to avoid the high costs – both human and financial – that come out of conflicts; and, we must also be realistic at managing expectations of what organizations can achieve alone whilst recognizing the huge potential for achieving collective outcomes in partnership.

5.    Mr. Dominique Burgeon
There should be continued focus on investing in food security through resilient livelihoods that are resistant to shocks.

Key outcomes/take away messages

Efforts must be streamlined to deliver collective outcomes aimed at addressing humanitarian needs today, laying the foundation for development work in the future, and ensuring resilient food systems and national food security and nutrition policies enable stability and lasting peace. The environment for collective outcomes has never been stronger, particularly in light of Agenda 2030. Work must be under-taken to bridge the humanitarian-development-peace nexus, and ensure that actors – including the private sector, national governments, civil society, NGOs – are moving in the same direction.

Side Event - 12 Contributing to sustaining peace and conflict prevention: perspectives from agriculture, food security and nutrition