059 Working together against food crises

A review of the current food crises situation and of major initiatives to address them: the Global Network against Food Crises

Organizers

  • FAO
  • WFP
  • EU DEVCO
  • EU ECHO

Abstract

According to the Global Report on Food Crises 2018, almost 124 million across 51 countries faced crisis levels of acute food insecurity or worse in 2017. In particular, the Report highlights the role of conflict as the main driver of acute hunger in 60 percent of cases. Furthermore, the Report shows that despite the important role of international assistance and national governments in responding to emergencies, the situation remains extremely precarious in several countries. This can be attributed to the intensification and protracted nature of conflicts as well as to limited coordination between humanitarian assistance and longer-term support to safeguard and restore livelihoods. It is to note that most of the countries affected are part of the list of protracted crises countries identified by SOFI , which deserve special in line with the CFS Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crises (FFA)

This calls to strengthen collaboration to address food crises between humanitarian, development and include peace actors to continue to raise global awareness and commitment. The Global Report represents the first step in enhancing coordination of food security and nutrition analyses by providing a common message for decision-makers and operational agencies. It aims to facilitate greater coordination to address these complex issues and advocate for high-level strategic buy-in to support the implementation of durable solutions to food crises. Towards this goal, the establishment of the “Global Network Against Food Crises” - first launched at the WHS by the European Union Commissioner for Development, the Director-General of FAO and the Executive Director of WFP to improve global coordination for prevention and response to food crises - means engaging in stronger partnerships.
Against this background, the side event will: a) present an update of the food security situation in countries affected by major food crises; b) present a number of initiatives and related challenges at the Global, Regional and country level aimed at addressing food crises in a sustainable manner along the humanitarian/development nexus; c) illustrate how the Global Network Against Food Crises can potentially support global and country level process towards sustainable solutions to food crises; d) help in identifying  a number of priorities that will require special attention in addressing food crises


Key speakers/presenters

  • Carla Montesi, Director, European Commission - DG DEVCO, Directorate for Planet and Prosperity (Moderator)
  • Anne-Claire Mouilliez, Food Security Information Network, FSIN Coordinator;
  • Dominique Burgeon, FAO, Director Emergency and Rehabilitation Division and Strategic Programme Leader (Resilience);
  • Yvonne Forsen, WFP, Deputy Head, Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping Unit;
  • Mahaboub Maalim, IGAD Executive Secretary;
  • Shuichi Akamatsu, Chair of the Food Assistance Committee, Minister for Economy Embassy of Japan in the United Kingdom;
  • Colin Bruce, Senior Adviser Fragility, Conflict and Violence Group, Global Themes Vice Presidency, World Bank;

Main themes/issues discussed

According to the Global Report on Food Crises 2018, almost 124 million across 51 countries faced crisis levels of acute food insecurity or worse in 2017.
In particular, the Report highlights the role of conflict as the main driver of acute hunger in 60 percent of cases. This calls for strengthening collaboration to address food crises between humanitarian and development, and include peace actors to continue to raise global awareness and commitment. Towards this goal, the “Global Network Against Food Crises” - first launched in 2016 at the World Humanitarian Summit by the European Union Commissioner for Development, the Director-General of FAO and the Executive Director of WFP to improve global coordination for prevention and response to food crises – is building stronger partnerships.

Summary of key points

The key points of the side event are the following:

a) Provided a summary on timeline and history of the Global Network as well as on analytical products made by FSIN for the Network in view of fostering dialogue and information sharing;
b) Presenters shared experiences on initiatives at the Global, Regional and country level aimed at addressing food crises in a sustainable manner along the humanitarian-development nexus;
c) Illustrated how the Global Network Against Food Crises can potentially support global and country level process towards sustainable solutions to food crises (i.e., provide near/real time analysis, mobilize coordination at all levels);
d) Identified several priorities that will require special attention in addressing food crises (i.e., sharing analysis and coordinating responses, preventing food insecurity, closing the data gap).

Key take away messages

The conclusions of the talks can be summarized as follows:

  • There is a vital need for increased coordination between humanitarian, development to fill the gaps between data on immediate needs and prevention/preparedness interventions, the gaps between food security analyses and response knowledge, and the gaps between humanitarian-development response and financing;
  • There is also an increasing need for humanitarian and development actors to coordinate with peace actor in a view to prevent and respond to crises and also in a perspective of sustaining peace;
  • These coordination challenges can be turned into a win-win relationship by building on the Network’s momentum as it focuses on the response and prevention to food crises, and on greater coordination along the humanitarian-development-peace nexus;
  • The partners to the Network recognized the value of the Global Report on Food Crises, welcomed partners’ contributing efforts to fill the remaining gaps, and called for even greater momentum for further coordination and synergies, not only on responses, but also on sharing lessons learned;
  • The next steps will rest on translating the key recommendations from the global network at the national level.
CFS Side Event 59 - Working together against food crises