061 Gender-responsive climate change-related policy, planning and management in the agriculture sector

Successful mechanisms demonstrated by LDCs and SIDS  and other international/global enabling mechanisms for meeting SDG sub target 13.b

Organizers

  • The Commonwealth Secretariat
  • Kingdom of Tonga
  • CARE International
  • UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
  • FAO
  • ICRAF/CCAFS of the CGIAR system
  • African Union Commission (tbc)
  • Consulate of Samoa in Italy

Abstract

The SDG sub-target 13.b calls on the Promotion of mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate change-related planning and management in Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States, including focusing on women, youth and local and marginalized communities
 
In this context, there is clear evidence that climate change is having gender-differentiated impacts, and in many cases is intensifying the constraints that rural women already place, especially those that rely on agriculture for their livelihoods, and are most vulnerable. While climate change can exacerbate existing gender inequalities in agriculture, it can also tap into women’s vast potential and agents of change and resilience building, if their important role in adaptation and mitigation is fully recognized and they are provided with equal access to productive assets, markets, climate information services, technology and training.
 
A host of countries have developed Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and National Adaptation Plans and National Agricultural Investment Plans with a view to aligning their agricultural policies and sector strategies, consolidating increased investment in agriculture for growth, transformation and poverty reduction.

These frameworks are the basis for channeling support and investments to the agriculture sector, and an important entry point for addressing policy, programmatic and investment gaps for gender equality and women’s empowerment in agriculture, food security and nutrition, and rural development interventions in the context of a changing climate. For instance, 75% of NDCs in Sub Saharan Africa included “gender” or “women” as part of their sustainable development priorities in the context of climate change.
 
The Gender Action Plan of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), adopted at COP23 in November seeks to mainstream gender perspectives in all mandated areas of its interventions. The requirement of gender-sensitive development impact has also become an integral condition for funding under the climate finance mechanisms under the Convention, such as the Green Climate Fund and the Global Environment Facility.
 
It is the perspectives of these stakeholders, The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), CARE International, the UNFCCC, the African Union, The Commonwealth Secretariat and various Small Island Developing States (SIDS), that harnessing women’s knowledge and potential will significantly enhance the resilience of households and communities.
 
The event aims to showcase experiences of various stakeholders from LDC/SIDS member states in meeting the SDG 13.b target (through NDCs/NAPs/ UNFCCC Gender action plan implementation) and gender-responsive policy, planning, and investment, including on research, the development of good practices and gender-responsive policy-making.

Key speakers/presenters

  • Facilitator: Ms Susan Kaaria, Team Leader, Social Policies and Rural Institution Division, FAO
  • Opening Remarks: Mr Zitouni Ould-Dada, Deputy Director, Climate and Environment Division, FAO

Screening of a Short Video – FAO NAP-Ag programme

Moderated Panel Discussion

  • Speaker 1: Ms Amelia Kinahoi-Siamomua, Head of Gender Section, Economic, Youth and Sustainable Development Directorate, Commonwealth Secretariat
  • Speaker 2: Ms Fleur Newman, Gender Affairs Lead, UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Secretariat
  • Speaker 3: H.E. Giovani Caffarelli, Samoan Honorary Consul General
  • Speaker 4: Mr Karl Deering, Director of Climate Resilient Agriculture Programm,e  CARE International

Main themes/issues discussed

There is clear evidence that climate change is having gender-differentiated impacts, intensifying the constraints already faced by rural women and deepening the gender gap in agriculture.   In addition, Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and Least Developed Countries (LDCs) share unique climate vulnerabilities, resulting in a set of related food security and nutrition challenges. There is increasing global political commitment and momentum to address gender and climate change in conjunction, evidenced by the recently adopted Gender action plan of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the strict requirements of gender-sensitive development impact for funding under large climate finance mechanisms, such as the Global Environment Facility and the Green Climate Fund.

Summary of key points

Panelists of the event, representing FAO, the UNFCCC Secretariat, the Commonwealth Secretariat,  CARE International and  Small Island Developing States (SIDS) presented approaches and experiences at macro, meso and field level and underscored that harnessing women’s knowledge and potential can significantly enhance the resilience of households and communities if their important role in adaptation and mitigation is fully recognized and they are provided with equal access to productive assets, markets, climate information services, technology and training.

FAO and its partners expressed dedication to implement and scale up interventions that embrace women’s fundamental role in food systems and the transformative and multiplier effect of gender equality in fulfilling the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, more specifically in line with SDG sub-target 13.b, that calls for the promotion of mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate change-related planning and management in Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States, including focusing on women, youth and local and marginalized communities.

In this respect, there was a call for inter-regional coordination, especially in relation to SIDS, looking at the intersection of climate change with other issues such as gender, youth, food security, health,  migration and  human rights.

Key take away messages

A wide variety of partners need to work together to collectively promote gender-transformative solutions for climate action in the agricultural sectors that address root causes of gender inequalities and build resilience. We must work together to bring these interventions to scale for impact to achieve food and nutrition security and sustainable agriculture in SIDS, LDCs and beyond, building on synergies and urging more dedicated funding for the gender-agriculture-climate change nexus.

CFS Side Event 61 - Gender-responsive climate change-related planning and management in the agriculture sector