CFS 46 Side Events - Expressions of Interest

Submissions from the CFS 46 Side Event Expression of Interest Survey are posted here. 

Click on the title to see more info and then click the orange button on the right to send an email to the Secretariat who will put you in touch with the organizers.

Expressions of Interest received so far: 48

Objective
In October 2015, the CFS endorsed the Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA), which confirmed the importance of addressing hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition in protracted crises, and brought a multistakeholder perspective on the three Rome-based Agencies (RBA) Joint Conceptual Framework on Resilience for food security and nutrition, adopted in April 2015. In 2015, Canada approached the RBAs to develop a joint resilience initiative in three pilot countries and in March 2017, Canada and the RBAs launched a flagship 5-year Joint Resilience Initiative to strengthen resilience in protracted crisis contexts in the DRC, the Niger and Somalia. The initiative is directly relevant to the operationalization by the RBAs and their partners of the CFS-FFA and its 11 principles, and builds on CFS events on resilience in 2015 and 2016 which triggered interest from stakeholders to move from concept to implementation. While hunger and acute food insecurity are on the rise globally (SOFI and Global report on food crises 2017 and 2018), hunger levels in protracted crisis, and fragile and humanitarian contexts, are three times higher than in average developing countries, and gender inequalities deeper and more acute. Protracted crises are becoming the norm, with 40 percent more ongoing food crises considered to be protracted than in 1990.
The proposed organizers:
FAO (UN)
WFP (UN)
IFAD (UN)
MC
CS
Expected outcome
Progress and lessons learned under the RBA partnership on resilience in the three countries shared with the CFS members. Potential options for collective action to improve the resilience of affected communities for food security, nutrition and gender equality in protracted crises, along the humanitarian- development-peace nexus will be explored.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
The Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA
Other information
CFS 45 hosted a first event enabling the RBA and the donor to illustrate to the audience the planning phase of this Resilience Initiative taking stock of the planning and first implementation phase. Building on the framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis, it is essential to showcase the progress made 2,5 years since the start of the programme.

Objective
Current Food Security programs focuses on distribution of food which is not viable keeping in mind the rapid increase in population, climate change, global conflict etc. Come up with a Long term Solution for Food Security in form of empowerment of masses. Learn from examples of Anand Milk Union Limited (AMUL) and MAHA Farmers Producer Co. Ltd (MAHAFPC) where empowerement of local communities and investment in their capabilities have contributed immensely to the food and nutritional security of entire nation(India). Development of a global food map with emphasis on food choice of communities coupled with the suitable crop of that geographical area. Once the vulnerable population is identified, focus on transformation of their capabilities so as to turn the hungry into harvesters. Formulate localized sustainable food production program with enough participation of women.
The proposed organizers:
National Law University Odisha 753015 (AC)
WB National University Of Juridical Sciences 700098 (AC)
Expected outcome
Global Food Map with identification of vulnerable communities and then an action plan to turn the hungry into harvesters.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
CFS guidelines on Responsible Investments In Agriculture and food systems
Other information
Initiatives like AMUL and MAHAFPC if repeated can strengthen farming communities, empower women & vulnerable and contribute immensely to localized sustainable food security. 'Ship to Mouth' can't work for long, turning needy into self dependent food producers is the need of hour.

Objective
The modern African diaspora communities, are not just dynamic components of the places they are located but also of Africa. Many migrated to Europe, not to leave their African communities behind but to insure their African communities can live. African diasporas have a vested interest in the agro food sector as entrepreneurs and also as consumers. Yet they are still not fully integrated or considered in the policy making. This event will not only highlight the link between food security and migration, but will also show the potentials in buildining an inclusive framework that supports diaspora participation in the agrofood sector.
The proposed organizers:
The Food Bridge vzw (CS)
Federation of Anglophone Africans Belgium (NO)
Entrepreneurs for Entrepreneurs (OT)
Africa Europe Faith and Justice Network (CS)
African Diaspora Projects Initiative (OT)
Expected outcome
Highlight the potentials and benefits of engaging with African Diaspora agrofood entrepreneurs Bring to the fore the important role of African Diasporans as influencers in their communities in Africa, thus relevant to the discourse on food security Create viable links across the different stakeholders and having African Diaspora recognized as important partners in achieving SDG2
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
-
Other information
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Objective
To achieve ZERO HUNGER, model programs are designed to address sustainable local solutions to food security and food literacy at the grass root levels. These programs should be culturally-appropriate and culturally-tailored, supporting the micro environment (ages, cultures, literacy level) in which families or neighborhoods feel comfortable coming together and learning about nutrition, food production and food security.The design should gear at breaking the cycle of poverty and food insecurity by including all generations in any given micro environment and should model and address all scopes of age, culture and literacy levels. When grass root stakeholders come together and learn about food production, nutrition and food security; a resilient global community that focuses on health, food safety and security is built, resulting into an economically developed community.
The proposed organizers:
CS
OT
RO
MS
NO
Expected outcome
Network and collaborate with the Civil Society members at grass root levels to achieve SGD2 faster and more effective.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
Sustainable agricultural development for food security and nutrition.
Other information
FAO and higher stakeholders need to shift energy and finance so as to highly invest in grass root level education about food production, nutrition and food safety. This is the best approach to achieve Zero Hunger.

Objective
This side-event makes a significant contribution towards the SDG agenda, nutrition, food security, education and gender equality. The objectives of the event is to: 1) share experiences and good practices 2) discuss the constraints and future needs for developing school feeding programs in developing countries 3) share innovative approaches and ways to frame school feeding experience 4) discuss the links between gender equality and school feeding
The proposed organizers:
Finland (MC)
Ethiopia (MC) (tbc)
Canada (MC)
WFP (UN)
Expected outcome
The event will contribute towards increased understanding of the achievement and challenges related to school feeding, how to take gender equality into account in school feeding and how to design efficient and effective ways of delivery of school meals. The Side Event will result in enhanced knowledge of participants on innovative ways to organize school feeding in different contexts.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
Nutrition and food systems; Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition; Social Protection for food security; Gender, food security and nutrition; The Global Strategic Framework for Food Security
Other information
 

Objective
To check and see which chemicals are used in chicken farming and are they use To analyse chemicals most and badly used in chicken tissues and eggs To evaluate dietary intake to these chemical residues for the population
The proposed organizers:
MC
UN
CS
PS
AC
Expected outcome
Different ways of the usage of chemicals in chicken farming Levels of chemicals badly used Dietary intake of the population
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
Avoidance of use chemicals during chicken farming
Other information
Provide safer food to consumers

Objective
This side events aims to share and debate emerging evidence about historic and possible future socioeconomic and environmental impacts of agricultural expansion in Sub-Saharan Africa. Food demand is expected to nearly triple by 2050 in most of SSA, but most SSA countries do not want to rely on imports of staple food crops (including cereals, roots and tubers) for national level food security. Even under optimistic assumptions about the ability to sustainable close the ‘yield gap’ and increase agricultural productivity significantly, this will result in an increase of the land under cultivation - often at the expense of natural habitats / ecosystems that provide essential environmental services. So who (which people) and what (which environmental functions) are likely to win or lose from this expansion? And how can trade-offs between food security (SDG2), reduced inequalities (SDG10) and protection of terrestrial ecosystems (SDG15) be better understood and managed? The event would aim to bring together stakeholders working on SDG trade-offs to discuss findings from the Sentinel project (https://www.sentinel-gcrf.org/ - Ghana, Ethiopia, Zambia and UK) and other research and development initiatives that explicitly aim to address trade-offs associated with SDG2. It would also consider how higher education organisations can foster a culture of interdisciplinarity and engagement of research users to address this global challenge.
The proposed organizers:
International Institute for Environment and Development - IIED (CS)
University of Ghana (AC)
Copperbelt University, Zambia (AC)
Environment and Climate Research Center - ECRC, Ethiopia (NO)
Regional Universities Forum for Capacity Building in Agriculture - RUFORUM (RO)
Expected outcome
The event is expected to have two outcomes: (1) an increased awareness of participants of the impacts, risks and trade-offs associated with the objective of national food self sufficiency, and possible ways of managing these sustainably; (2) enhanced collaboration and partnerships between programmes working on these issues.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
(1) Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems (2) Sustainable forestry for food security and nutrition (CFS 44, 2017) (3) Land tenure and international investments in agriculture (CFS 37: 2011)

Objective
I. Signs of Crisis 2. Impact of Subsidies 3. Neglect of the Small Producer 4. Degradation of the Resource Base 5Loss of Soil Resources 6. Advancing Deserts 7. Strategies for Sustainable Food Security 8. A Global Perspective 9. The Resource Base 10. Land Use 11. Aquaculture 12. Productivity and yields 13.The Technological Base 14. Human Resources 15.Productivity of Inputs 16. Equity 17. Land Reforms 18. Subsistence Farmers and Pastoralists 19. Integrated Rural Development 20. Food Availability Fluctuations
The proposed organizers:
Private Sector
Regional Organizations/Initiatives
Member Country
International Financial Institutions
Civil Society/NGOs
Expected outcome
Success
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
 

Objective
- Discuss how land rights of rural women can be achieved through the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure (VGGT).
- Draw lessons from some country cases
- Discuss measures as to how those lessons can be replicated in other countries, regions
The proposed organizers:
UN
OT
IF
Expected outcome
- Better understanding on how the VGGT (a CFS product) can help secure land rights of rural women.
- Lessons learned from country cases that can be replicated in other countries to help secure land rights of rural women.
Other Information
This event will be co-organized with other partners.

Objective
Food security as defined by FAO has four dimensions namely: availability; accessibility; stability and utilization. Even though the term 'food security' does not clearly spell out the nutrition dimension, for nutrition to be achieved, all the dimensions have to be addressed. This requires integrated approaches aimed at achieving concurrently health, nutrition and improved income outcomes. In October 2015, the CFS endorsed the Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA) with 11 principles to address food and nutrition insecurity, including managing natural resources sustainably; creation of economic opportunities for smallholders, particularly rural women and youth, as well as vulnerable and marginalized groups. In 2017, the CFS Committee embarked on a multistakeholder policy convergence process which will lead to the development of Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition to be presented for endorsement at CFS47 in October 2020. The guidelines are expected to counter the existing policy fragmentation between the food, agriculture and health sectors while also addressing livelihood and sustainability challenges and to contribute to making food systems nutrition-sensitive and promoting secure access to safe, diverse and high-quality diets for everyone. The session will highlight practical examples from Indonesia; Ghana; Somalia; Zimbabwe and Sahel region.
The proposed organizers:
World Vision (CS)
DSM (PS)
Sight & Life (AC)
SDG2 Hub (MS)
Expected outcome
Sharing of practical examples of how food systems; financial inclusion; health and nutrition programming can be integrated to achieve both nutrition and improved income objectives in support of the Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition. The session will also aim to increase participant knowledge on the multi-layered, gendered causes of malnutrition, and the need for similarly layered interventions using the UNICEF Framework for Malnutrition.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
Framework for Action for Food and Nutrition in protracted Crisis
Agro-Ecological Approaches 2109
Nutrition and Food Systems 2020
Connecting Smallholders to Markets
Investing in smallholder agriculture for food security
Other Information
Integrated and sustainable livelihoods approaches aimed at improving both food security and nutrition and income needs of smallholder farmers, particularly women, if scaled up leads to the achievement of SDG2 and other interrelated SDGs such as 1 on ending poverty; 10 on reducing inequalities; 13 on combating climate change.

Objective
Technological innovation represents a key catalyser for transformational change in the fight against hunger and malnutrition. In a context of increasingly complex and protracted crises, rapidly growing population, natural resource scarcity, and climate change, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling more efficient and effective food systems in our efforts to achieve SDG 2. In the wake of these fundamental global challenges, new technologies have shown tremendous potential to target vulnerable populations and address malnutrition. However, building more sustainable and resilient food systems to enhance food security and nutrition requires not only innovative research and technologies, but also increased access to these technologies and context-specific solutions. The objective of this Side Event is to showcase how innovation and access to technology play a pivotal role in improving food systems for healthier diets and enhanced nutrition. In particular, it aims to be a unique occasion to share best practices and lessons learnt of how different stakeholders (public, private, civil society, and UN) have leveraged the power of technology for improved nutrition. The Side Event will examine different case studies in different contexts – such as drone technology and SCOPE CODA – where new technologies have proved instrumental in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nutrition interventions.
The proposed organizers:
WFP (UN)
Expected outcome
This Side Event will feature examples of how technological innovation can be leveraged to address malnutrition and achieve SDG 2. Participants will learn the key role of multistakeholder and cross-sectoral collaboration among governments, private businesses, UN agencies, civil society organisations, academia and NGOs to scale up and improve access to innovative solutions to tackle malnutrition in all its forms. By featuring the role of cutting-edge technologies in addressing global fundamental challenges, it is expected that this will be a highly engaging, dynamic and interactive session.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
This Side Event aims to link to the following CFS policy guidelines and/or recommendations:
  • Nutrition and food systems (2020)
  • The Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition (GSF)
  • Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems (RAI)
  • Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the Framework of the 2030 Agenda (2018)
  • Food security and climate change
  • Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA)

Objective
To provide information from the farmers' experience on the use and impact (economic, environmental and social impact) of biotechnology.
The proposed organizers:
MAIZALL - the Alliance of Maize Growers Associatios of Argentina, Brazil and the U.S.
Expected outcome
To secure the understanding of CFS delegates of the on-farm impact of biotech maize and other innovative technologies from the personal experiences of farmers.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
These technologies can contribute to securing the goal of improving food security in countries around the world
Other information
MAIZALL is looking for opportunities to collaborate with other interested organizations on this side event.

Objective
Today, 821 million people are chronically food insecure globally. Of these, no less than 60 percent – that is, about 490 million people – live in countries affected by conflict. 75 percent of stunted children – some 122 out of 155 million children – are living in countries plagued by armed conflict and violence. This Side Event aims to showcase the devastating effects of conflicts and humanitarian emergencies on food systems and nutrition and explore practical ways to address this critical challenge. First, by considering specific and concrete examples, the event will address some of the key challenges for food systems and nutrition that the humanitarian and development communities face in particularly fragile contexts. Second, the panel discussion aspires to be a unique occasion to suggest specific practical solutions and ways of working together in the humanitarian-development continuum to enable better nutrition in food systems that have been disrupted by sudden shocks and protracted crises. Third, in view of the development of the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition, this event aims to be a timely and highly relevant discussion that is expected to inform discussions around the Guidelines and highlight potential ways of working together to strengthen food systems in fragile humanitarian contexts.
The proposed organizers:
WFP (UN)
Expected outcome
This Side Event aims to be an engaging, dynamic and interactive session featuring examples of how food systems that have been disrupted by conflicts and humanitarian crises can strengthen their resilience for enhanced nutrition. First, the event aims to increase awareness that if we truly are to reach the most vulnerable segments of the population, it is essential that the humanitarian perspective is genuinely addressed. Second, it will be a unique occasion to showcase what has worked – and potential bottlenecks – in building resilient food systems for enhanced nutrition in conflict-stricken and emergency contexts. Third, participants will deepen their understanding of the role that different actors (public, private, civil society and UN) play in building resilient food systems in humanitarian settings. Finally, it is expected that participants to this event will understand the complex and yet highly far-reaching linkages within the humanitarian-development-peace nexus and learn from different actors compelling ways of improving food systems to enable healthy diets in particularly fragile settings.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
This Side Event will be closely linked to the ongoing development of the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition. Additionally, the Side Event aims to link to the following CFS policy guidelines and recommendations:
  • Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA)
  • The Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition (GSF)
  • Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the Framework of the 2030 Agenda (2018)
  • Connecting smallholders to markets
  • Food security and climate change
  • Social protection for food security
Other information

Objective
Adolescents are the human capital of the future, drivers of economic growth, and parents of the next generation. Adolescence provides the second-best window of opportunity to influence developmental trajectories; nonetheless, current global data on adolescent nutrition are alarming and call for accelerated action. While the global prevalence of underweight has decreased from 1976 to 2016, the prevalence of obesity is increasing in every region and country. Evidence identifies adolescence as a critical period in the development of adult non-communicable diseases (NCDs): overweight and obese adolescents are more likely to stay obese into adulthood and to develop NCDs, like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, at a younger age. Global trends indicate that behavioural risk factors for NCDs are on the rise among young people. Given its expertise in consumer behaviour, market reach, food technology and supply chain, the private sector has an enormous potential to impact food systems and improve adolescent nutrition. The event will provide participants with the opportunity to reflect on the role private sector can play across food systems to increase adolescents’ access to, and consumption of healthy diets. It will also shed light on the private sector’s role in easing the devastating consequences of NCDs later in life.
The proposed organizers:
WFP (UN)
Expected outcome
The panel will provide an opportunity for speakers to: 1. Feature examples of ways to harness the private sector’s comparative advantage across food systems to enable healthy diets and improve nutrition and well-being particularly among adolescents;
2. Exchange views about opportunities and challenges around multi-stakeholder collaboration and private sector engagement for improved adolescent nutrition;
3. Lay the groundwork for scaling up positive models and partnerships that enable healthy diets and improve nutrition particularly among this important age group.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
It is expected that this Side Event will build on the work currently being undertaken by the CFS on the Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition and at the same time inform current discussions around this topic so that this important age-group is not left behind. Additionally, it is expected that this Side Event will also relate to the following CFS policy guidelines and recommendations:
  • Gender, food security and nutrition
  • Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA)
  • Multistakeholder partnerships to finance and improve nutrition in the framework of 2030 Agenda (2018)

Objective
Attracting young people into agriculture and supporting them in their journey to successful agribusinesses, remains a huge challenge. Various organisations are engaged in trying to meet this challenge through competitions, hackathons, boot camps, incubators, accelerators, business and agricultural training as well as mentorship programmes. How effective are these various initiatives? This session will bring together young agripreneurs who have participated in such programmes to share their experiences in starting, and building, their business. The objective is to “connect the dots” between the various types of programme. To explore ways to increase their efficiency and to provide an eco-system (rather than one individual initiative) to support the young budding agripreneur. (tbd)
The proposed organizers:
CNS-FAO (Multi-Stakeholder Advisory Committee)
Agripreneurship Alliance (NGO)
FAO (UN, tbd)
YPARD (other, tbd)
PSM (tbd)
Expected outcome
Raising awareness on the challenge to attract young people into agriculture and agri-business. Understanding the context in which initiatives such as competitions, hackathons, boot camps, incubators, accelerators, training and mentorship programmes significantly assist young agripreneurs. Determine how these initiatives can be improved to become more effective? Rather than one isolated initiative, how can the dots be connected to provide a support eco-system for the young budding agripreneur? (tbd)
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition (2017)
Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (2015)
CFS Principles for Responsible Investments in Agricultural and Food Systems (2014)
Investing in smallholder agriculture for food security (2013)
Current proposal for the formation of a CFS Youth Council

Objective
Urbanization and corresponding rural transformation means transformation at the heart of the food system. Harnessing this transformation for improving nutrition requires aligning technical cooperation and financial investment. The objectives of this Side Event are to share the understanding of how the changing food environment in specific low income countries constrains consumers’ options and behaviors and to discuss how technical cooperation, evidence sharing and aligning of investment priorities can be used to better direct efforts towards achieving SDG 2. Using technical expertise from Rome-based Agencies, the collaboration between IFAD and WFP generates food systems-based contextual identification of nutrition-sensitive priorities and entry points, across food production, supply chain, processing, increasing consumer demand, that can be leveraged to improve nutrition. The Fill the Nutrient Gap assessment is used, which focuses on bottlenecks and opportunities around availability, physical access, affordability and choice of nutritious foods, including for specific target groups. The session will be centered on country case studies (e.g. Lesotho and/or Burkina Faso) to showcase how WFP and IFAD jointly use multi-sectoral evidence and stakeholder engagement, in particular focused on agroecological approaches and smallholder farmers for sustainable food systems to inform their technical assistance and investment priorities to reach Zero Hunger.
The proposed organizers:
WFP (UN)
IFAD (IF)
BMZ - German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development
Burkina Faso – Conseil National de Securite Alimentaire
Lesotho – Food and Nutrition Coordination Office (FNCO), Ministry of Agriculture
Expected outcome
The above issues demand that policy makers adopt a systems approach that involves stakeholders from the public and private sectors to transform food systems for improved nutrition. Concretely, this session aims to:
  • raise awareness on the need and ways to achieve inclusive multi-stakeholder dialogue to align actions towards sustainable and nutritious food systems
  • showcase models that successfully inform and enhance action towards nutrition-sensitive agriculture (Lesotho and Burkina Faso)
  • expand opportunities for multistakeholder partnerships to align investment priorities and accelerate progress on SDG2
  • by showing how financial investment and technical cooperation can be aligned to enhance food and nutrition security, illustrate how they can also contribute to reaching other SDGs: poverty reduction, health and well-being, economic growth, industry and infrastructure, responsible consumption and partnerships.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition
Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition
Investing in Smallholder Agriculture for Food Security and Nutrition
Connecting Smallholders to Markets
Sustainable Agricultural Development for Food Security and Nutrition: What Roles for Livestock?

Objective
In December 2018, the UN General Assembly has proclaimed 2020 as the International Year of Plant Health (IYPH). This is a bold global occasion to raise awareness on how healthy plants are positively affecting our lives and how much they deserve to be protected. This outstanding opportunity must be taken not only by FAO and the IPPC community, but also by all those organizations and conventions that are working on food security, biodiversity, environmental protection, international trade, and of course plant health. Protecting healthy plants is a crucial issue that can help solve many other global challenges, such as poverty, malnutrition and hunger.
The proposed organizers:
IPPC Secretariat
Member Country
Private Sector
Civil Society
Academia
Expected outcome
The side event on IYPH is expected to raise awareness on plant health and its crucial contribution to food security and the SDGs. That would be also a great opportunity to promote responsible and sustainable practices among the public in view of the International Year of Plant Health in 2020.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
Food security and climate change

Objective
In order to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals and benefit some of the poorest and most vulnerable people in society, there is a need for simple and cost effective solutions. An area where partnership has led to significant improvement and advances in achieving the SDGs is training and community engagement with people who rely on animals for their livelihoods. One area that we have seen gains is in improving the welfare of working animals (horses, donkeys, mules, camels and oxen). An estimated 200 million working animals currently play an essential role in the livelihoods of many people in low and middle income countries, through agriculture and resource provision. As part of daily life, they provide transport for food, water and goods, access to economic and educational resources and draught power for increased productivity and income generation within agriculture. They can also be integral in lessening the burden on women, by increasing their economic resources, and raising the status of women in their communities.
Simple interventions, such as access to veterinary health care, welfare training, suitable and affordable equipment, can empower owners to keep their working animals healthy and ensure their continued productive benefit. In this respect, working animal health and welfare is a strong contributor to sustainable development and partnership enables growth in this area.
The proposed organizers:
The Donkey Sanctuary (CS)
Brooke (CS)
SPANA (CS)
World Horse Welfare (CS)
Expected outcome
a) Build long term knowledge of how working animals contribute to sustainable development so that they will get specific mention in national policy plans e.g. including teaching on handling and basic animal health at school level so that we make long term gains in this area
b) This event should also encourage all attendees to see working animals as a priority area so that they discuss this during relevant UN meetings and linking it to economic empowerment, gender equality, water &sanitation etc.
c) That working animals are mentioned in Voluntary National Reviews of different countries going forward as a contribution to development
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
Sustainable Agricultural Development for Food Security and Nutrition: What Roles for Livestock?
Investing in Smallholder Agriculture for Food Security and Nutrition
Connecting Smallholders to Markets

Objective
The Rome-based agencies (RBAs) are committed to ensuring that food security and good nutrition are available to a growing global population, especially in the context of climate change. Climate change already affects all dimensions of food security as well as the determinants of malnutrition. In order to achieve both SDG 2 and the Paris Agreement, food security and nutrition (FSN) need to be placed at the heart of climate action and governance.
Climate change, food security and nutrition are fundamentally interconnected and share overlapping agendas and common objectives. Promoting sustainable food systems that ensure healthy diets require strengthening the resilience and adaptation of agricultural sectors to climate change, as well as early actions to reduce climate risks.
The objective of this side event is to highlight the importance of integrating food security and nutrition into climate change action. The side event will bring together key stakeholders from member countries, UNFCCC, civil society and private sector to exchange views on how to scale up the interlinkages between food security, nutrition and climate change.
The proposed organizers:
New Zealand (MC)
FAO (UN)
WFP (UN)
IFAD (UN)
Expected outcome
Addressing this theme through this event would help strengthen the linkages between the work of CFS and climate change action. Participants would learn about country examples as well as initiatives from civil society and private sector that tackle climate change and food security and nutrition in an integrated way. The take away message should be that addressing this nexus is key to building climate resilient agricultural sectors while ensuring food security, including for the most vulnerable communities.
Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
The 2012 policy recommendations on climate change.

Objective
Youth holds the key to achieving many of the SDGs, and so does sustainable food systems. When abolishing hunger and at the same time achieving decent and inclusive work for youth, the climate and environmental challenges, alongside the unjust distribution of resources, will be resolved.
Therefore, we want to invite youth to define what needs to be done in order for the climate agricultural sector to be a place of decent work. We understand that many of the member countries of the UN have missed the target when it comes to both including and targeting youth in their policies. Having youth at the forefront of a new era of development policies is crucial to reach sustainable food systems.
The proposed organizers:
Spire (CS)
Climate Smart Agriculture Youth Network (CS))
Climate Justice Resilience Fund (CS))
Expected outcome
To gather information and demands from youth on what needs to be done in order to make climate smart agriculture an attractive and decent workplace.

Objective
Sustainable food from the ocean and inland waters can play a critical role in global food security and nutrition. However, aquatic food is often excluded in discussions regarding food and nutrition policies. National policies on fisheries and aquaculture often focus on the biological sustainability and economic efficiency rather than their role in ensuring food security and optimal nutrition. Therefore, a global action network was established with the aim to increase the nutritional impact by fisheries and aquaculture as a window of opportunity of ICN2 follow-up towards achieving healthy diets.
The session will focus on how we can ensure access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food from the oceans and inland waters that meet dietary needs and food preferences for a growing population.
  • Gain and share national actions in line with the policy recommendations of Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture for Food Security and Nutrition in the CFS global strategy
  • Increase awareness of fish and aquatic food as a key food source for achieving food security and improved nutrition
  • Support each other by sharing knowledge and experience faced with consumption of fish and aquatic food as part of a nutritious diet and sustainable harvesting and production of aquatic food
The proposed organizers:
The Global Action Network "Sustainable food from the ocean and inland waters for food security and nutrition" (OT)
Norway (MC)
Ireland (tbc)
Netherlands (tbc)
WordFish (tbc)
Expected outcome
  • Make food from the oceans and inland waters part of the food and nutrition discussions
  • Mobilize actions to include aquatic food as a key food source for achieving food security and improved nutrition in the Decade of Action on Nutrition and in line with the SDGs
  • Follow up recommendations from the CFS Global Strategic Framework regarding sustainable fisheries and aquaculture for food security and nutrition
  • Follow up missions of the Global Action Network in the Decade of Action on Nutrition “Food from the Ocean and Inland Waters for Food Security and Nutrition”
  • Inspire others to join the Global Action Network “Sustainable food from the Ocean and Inland Waters for Food Security and Nutrition”
  • Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Policy recommendations Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture for Food Security and Nutrition
    Other information
    The Global Action Network on Sustainable Food from the Oceans and Inland Waters for Food Security and Nutrition was established with the aim to provide a platform for countries to include aquatic food as a key food source for achieving food security and improved nutrition. The network aims to share best practices and evidence-based knowledge, and work to priorities aquatic food solutions in policy, investment, research, and action. The CFS report on, and recommendations in, Sustainable fisheries and aquaculture for food security and nutrition serve as a basis of this work. During CFS 46, the Side event is open for all CFS participants, however it will also function as "gain and share" session for the Global Action Network meeting which will be held following the Side event. This Network meeting will aim to provide input to the Our Ocean conference held in Oslo the following week, Oct. 23. -24. 2019.

    Objective
    To counter recent setbacks in developing pro-smallholder seed policies in Africa, this session will present examples of how the seed needs and rights of smallholder farmers can be can be addressed at both the policy level and by Small and Medium scale seed enterprises.
    The proposed organizers:
    Self Help Africa (CS)
    IFPRI (AR)
    Irish Aid (MC)
    Vita (CS)
    ISSD (AR)
    Expected outcome
  • Better understanding of the value and the potential of small and medium scale seed enterprise in addressing current food and nutrition challenges at both programme and policy level
  • Innovative avenues for multisectoral collaboration identified
  • Research gaps and opportunities identified
  • Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems and Connecting Smallholders to Markets

    Objective
    Reducing food waste and loss are long-standing challenges in efforts to end hunger, improve farmer incomes, and promote sustainable production and consumption. Understanding where and why losses occur along the food chain is important to developing effective policies. For instance, storage is an important element in food security stability, but getting stock holding wrong exacerbates waste and undermines farmers’ prices. Addressing these storage-related challenges, which date back decades, require more than just an understanding of recent technological advances. It also requires better-informed policy. That’s where Ceres2030 makes a contribution. Ceres2030: sustainable solutions to end hunger, is a joint initiative of Cornell University, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), and the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD). Ceres2030 weds an economic model to cost interventions with a series of evidence reviews that identify interventions that proven to be effective in tackling hunger. By shining the light on post-harvest food losses, this side event will look at how economic models, machine learning, systematic reviews, and other research tools can help policymakers and donors assess the financial costs and identify effective ways to reduce waste and food loss.
    The proposed organizers:
    International Institute for Sustainable Development (CS)
    Cornell University (AC)
    IFPRI (AR)
    BMZ, Germany (MC)
    Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (PF)
    Expected outcome
  • Illustrate how the tools that Ceres2030 partners use can contribute to sharper policy choices for public investments in agriculture that support the realization of SDG 2
  • Help policymakers and aid donors understand the financial costs and identify effective interventions that reduce post-harvest waste and food loss
  • Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    The side event is focused on the implementation of SDG 2, especially 2.1 (ending hunger); 2.3 (doubling small-scale producer income); and, 2.4 (improving environmental performance). It introduces a complex system approach (as encouraged in successive HLPE reports), using evidence syntheses and an economic cost model to understand the dynamic effects of investments in the agricultural sector.

    Objective
    The majority of the world's population live in countries where overweight and obesity kills more people than underweight. The problem shows no signs of abating. Can a better understanding of the built food environment (foodscape) help us to design impactful, hands-on and far-reaching interventions? This side event investigates the intersection of health (SDG3), urban planning (SDG 11) and food systems (SDG2). The three main objectives are: 1) to understand the role of urban foodscapes in shaping obesogenic environments in urban areas; 2) to share and discuss the results of ground-breaking action research and pilot projects; and 3) to debate suitable interventions leading to behaviour change. To date, there have been few studies on the impact of the built food environment outside of high-income countries. Future research and interventions focusing on the built environment must include the full spectrum of dietary, nutrition, and health outcomes. Improving the quality of food environment research will be critical to the design of feasible, appropriate, and effective interventions across scales to improve public health nutrition in low- and medium-income countries. Addressing the root causes of obesogenic environments is a complex undertaking that calls for the involvement of multiple stakeholders including community leaders, urban planners, private sector, civil society, citizens, research institutions and government.
    The proposed organizers:
    Gehl (PS)
    Novo Nordisk Cities Changing Diabetes (PS) (tbc)
    UNICEF (UN)
    FAO (UN) (tbc)
    EAT Foundation (PF) (tbc)
    Expected outcome
  • Raise the status of urban planning as a critical tool in addressing overnutrition
  • Forge new partnerships and collaborations between multiple stakeholders responding to the obesity epidemic.
  • Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    CFS 2019/46/3 - Progress Report on Follow-up to the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2), including Implementation of the United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition / CFS 2019/46/2 - Zero Draft of the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition / CFS 2019/46/4 - Urbanization, Rural Transformation and Implications for Food Security and Nutrition: Summary of the 2018-19 Intersessional Events

    Objective
    The side event will discuss the:
    Importance of balancing multisectoriality vs. sectoral approaches in integrating nutrition into agriculture development interventions;
    Need to communicate the feasibility for business and nutrition objectives to converge;
    Experience with existing efforts to foster this alignment (e.g. donor-funded initiatives encouraging the supply of nutrient-dense foods that have emerged, such as GAIN’s Marketplace for Nutritious Foods; or companies’ adoption of hybrid and social business models to develop future market opportunities);
    The potential of nutrition smart agriculture to guide supply-side decisions to make available a diversified, safe, affordable, nutrient-rich foods.
    The event will also showcase a preliminary version of the nutrition smart agriculture country profile that aims to provide a developing snapshot of country-specific agricultural and nutritional challenges, while advancing recommendations on entry points for investment and what type of nutrition smart agriculture interventions could be developed.
    The proposed organizers:
    World Bank Group (MS)
    FAO (UN)
    GAIN (OT)
    Expected outcome
  • To promote sectoral action (aside from the multisectoral action already being promoted) to integrate nutrition into agriculture interventions.
  • To foster a better understanding of the opportunities and challenges associated with meeting business and nutrition objectives.
  • To contribute to the global effort to develop a unifying narrative for sustainable and healthy food systems and diets.
  • To contribute to the discourse on the food systems’ contribution to tackling malnutrition.
  • Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems
    Investing in smallholder agriculture for food security (CFS 40: 2013)
    How to increase food security and smallholder sensitive investments in agriculture (CFS 37: 2011)
    CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition

    Objective
    Productive Alliances (PAs) are a strategic approach aiming to link several core agents (smallholder producers, buyers, technical assistance providers, and commercial financial institutions) through three core activities linked to producer's needs (productive investment, technical assistance, and business development). The PA model promotes the integration of smallholders into value chains, enhancing their livelihoods and reducing inequality. In this regard it contributes significantly to the achievement of several UN – Sustainable Development Goals, notably Goal 1 "No poverty," Goal 2 "Zero hunger," and Goal 10 "Reduced inequalities" among those most vulnerable in the agriculture sector. After two decades of successfully implementing the PA model in the Latin American and Caribbean region, where it is often deemed to have been introduced, there is growing interest in bringing innovation to the existing model to leverage diverse financing arrangements, technological advancements, and attention to environmental and social sustainability. The integration of aspects related to diversified production, value addition, youth, women and minorities inclusion, digital technologies and innovations in terms of products and processes will be vital to this Productive Alliances “2.0” model.
    The proposed organizers:
    World Bank Agriculture Global Practice, Latin America and Caribbean Region(PS)
    Expected outcome
  • Exchange of knowledge, good practices, and lessons-learned from implemented Productive Alliance (PA) projects and discussion with participating stakeholders on how to bring innovation to the PA model
  • Scaling the PA model up and out in additional regions by replicating success cases, contributing to the poverty, inequality, and food and nutrition security agendas to impact smallholders across the globe
  • Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    CFS guidelines on "Connecting Smallholders to Markets
    Other information
    This event would be co-sponsored by other partners, and potentially include representation from a Productive Alliance from the Latin American and Caribbean region.

    Objective
    The Green Climate Fund (GCF) provides financial support to developing countries to promote a paradigm shift towards low emissions and climate resilient sustainable development. The GCF Secretariat is planning to develop strategic framework documents setting out its ambition in all its results areas and related sectors, one being agriculture, rural livelihoods and food security. Aligned with the GCF’s investment framework, this future strategic document will define GCF’s priority interventions, and set the scope of the paradigm shift and transformations that need to be achieved to move towards climate-resilient low-emission agriculture development. The objective of the side event is to discuss the forthcoming draft GCF sectoral strategy for agriculture and food security and gather inputs from delegates on strategic interventions and partnerships to enhance food security and nutrition impacts of GCF funded climate change adaptation and mitigation projects and programmes.
    The proposed organizers:
    GCF (OT)
    Expected outcome
  • The content of the GCF sectoral strategy for agriculture and food security is enhanced by the inputs of the delegates, and strategic partnerships are identified
  • Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    TBD
    Other information
    Potentially co-organized with Italy (MC), and UNFCCC (UN). TBC

    Objective
    Promoting sustainability in the agricultural sector through transparent supply chains and an ethical approach to the agricultural workforce is a priority for the UK government. Thanks toworld-leading measures like the requirement for businesses with over £36m turnover to comply with Transparency in Supply Chains legislation and a strong partnership with IOM, the UK government is enhancing corporate responsibility and significantly contributing to protecting human and labour rights and ensuring a higher quality of products.In this context, we will explore, together with our partners IOM and the Milan Centre for Food Law and Policy, the benefits of transparent supply chains and of tackling serious risks like “food fraud” and the practice of “double downward auctions” fuelling labour exploitation and unsafe food products. Also, thanks to our ongoing work with the Italian government and key stakeholders in this field, we will showcase a recent example of effective collaboration between Princes UK, a company processing tomatoes in Italy, and Coldiretti, the Italian National Confederation of Farmers, through an agreement signed in February 2019 providing financial stability for growers and long-term sustainability of the industry. This agreement also introduced ablockchain platform to trace products through the supply chain and track workers’ safety rights.
    The proposed organizers:
    UK, British Embassy Rome (MC)
    IOM (UN)
    Milan Centre for Food, Law and Policy (OT)
    Expected outcome
  • Our side event will cover the CFS Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systemslooking at mechanisms toassess and address economic, social, and cultural impacts, considering respect of human rights andpromoting accountability of each actor to all relevant stakeholders, especially the most vulnerable
  • Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Our main aim is to raise awareness on how abiding by transparent and legal business practices in agriculture can lead to a better product quality and respect of human rights, while still making business profitable

    Objective
    The objective is to take up Dr Graziano da Silva’s challenge: “The current food systems are designed for something other than guaranteeing good nutrition: our challenge is to redesign them,”
    The coexisting epidemics of undernutrition, obesity and climate change share interacting systems and have common deep drivers - constituting a 'syndemic'. Tackling each alone is less effective than tackling them systemically, with ‘win-win’, or even triple-win, actions.
    The purpose of this side event will be to highlight potential win-win policies across food supplies, diet, transport, and land use. In addition, the side event will address the increasingly recognized problem of ‘policy inertia’ – the resistance to policies that challenge the current food system, especially in the areas of (i) government motivation to act, (ii) commercial response to change, and (iii) public demand for action.
    Potential topics include market controls versus market incentives, the protection of nutritious dietary patterns from commercial influence, the need for pioneers to lead the private sector, the potential for human rights legislation to achieve policy change, the role of trade and the WTO, and the voices of young people in demanding action for change.
    The proposed organizers:
    World Obesity Federation (CS)
    FAO (UN)
    Invited (MC)
    Invited (MC)
    Expected outcome
    1. Increased awareness of the importance of syndemic thinking when looking at food, nutrition and climate change issues.
    2. Priority win-win actions identified for policy development.
    3. Understanding of participant views and perspectives on challenges faced, and areas to explore to overcome these
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    1. Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems.
    2. Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition (2017).
    3. Voluntary Guidelines to support the progressive realization of the right to adequate food in the context of the national food security.
    4. Food security and climate change.
    Other information
    The meeting also contributes to the Decade of Action on Nutrition and the ICN2 follow-up on malnutrition in all forms, as well as SDG 3.4 and 2.2.

    Objective
    1. Stocktaking of knowledge on learning from responsible land investment initiatives (RLI) with CFS member states and participants initiatives, and how and investment can contribute to the SDGs.
    2. Lesson sharing from RLI pilot initiatives, and dissemination of a DFID – LEGEND programme briefing paper and tools and products developed by LEGEND partners to assist responsible and inclusive agricultural investment that protects legitimate land rights.
    3. Preparing the ground for future stocktaking on implementation and scaling of VGGT and CFS RAI principles in the agricultural investment processes to strengthen food and nutrition security
    4. Interactive stakeholder debate on promising ways forward to ensure that agricultural investment respects land and human rights and contributes to the SDGs.
    The proposed organizers:
    UK Government: DFID and UK office in Rome (MC)
    FAO (UN)
    CFS Private Sector Mechanism (PS)
    DFID Legend Programme Civil Society Partners (CS)
    Expected outcome
    a) Knowledge and lessons shared amongst CFS participants on the place of land tenure governance in responsible agricultural investments.
    b) CFS members and audience awareness of new analysis, available tools and resources.
    c) Greater sense of stakeholder priorities, options and challenges to ensure application of the VGGT to inform future partnership initiatives in agricultural investment and to strengthen food security sustainably.
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    VGGT and CFS-RAI.
    Reports of the CFS HLPE on Food Security and Nutrition.
    Other information
    The side event will summarize and disseminate the principle outcomes and products from the DFID LEGEND program (Land: Enhancing Governance for Economic Development) on the governance of tenure and of agricultural investments, focussing on sub-Saharan Africa. Through LEGEND, DFID and its direct partners have engaged and collaborated widely with other donors, multilateral agencies, private business, development finance institutions and CSOs in UK, US, Africa and Europe to assess the key issues and challenges, and develop new tools and practical guidance. Including piloting new partnership approaches in 5 African countries (Malawi, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, Tanzania and Zambia), the overall aim has been to generate new knowledge for application by agribusiness, private and public investors, and by donors, international agencies and civil society to strengthen good practice in policy, programming and partnership initiatives going forward, to help ensure that agricultural investment is genuinely responsible and makes real contributions to the Sustainable Development Goals. The organizers are exploring potential contributions to this side event from member states, specific civil society partners and other bilateral donors.

    Objective
    The international demand for and trade with agricultural commodities is growing, induced by a gradual shifting from petroleum based to bio-based economies. Concerns about the sustainability of the production of agricultural commodities is increasing, with the rising demand for biomass for food, feed, energy and biobased materials. In particular food security has been at the core of the sustainability debate due to the rising competition among different uses and competition for land and natural resources. Despite persisting hunger in countries producing global agricultural commodities, food security has been hardly addressed in sustainability standards and certification schemes. The Food Security Standard (FSS) provides a set of practicable and measurable criteria and audit tools that can be incorporated in sustainability standards and certification schemes to ensure the realization of the Human Right to adequate Food in agricultural production.
    The side event will present the Food Security Standard and the results of pilot tests carried out in plantations and smallholder farms in Africa, Asia and Latin-America. Key challenges and opportunities to mainstream food security into sustainability certification schemes will be discussed.
    The proposed organizers:
    German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture, BMEL (MC)
    WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature) (CS)
    Welthungerhilfe (CS)
    Center for Development Research of the University of Bonn (AC)
    Expected outcome
    Exchange of experiences and lessons-learned regarding food security of farmers, workers and surrounding communities in sustainably certified agriculture.
    The participants will learn about the opportunities and challenges of implementing the human rights-based food security criteria in the agricultural sector. This will contribute to the dissemination and further implementation of the Food Security Standard.
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems Voluntary guidelines on the responsible governance of tenure (VGGT)

    Objective
    Increasing the scientific knowledge in the applications of the agricultural production assessment methodology using the Aqua-Crop model and regional Climate data sets provides a clear picture for policy makers on the impact level of water variability due to climate change on agricultural productivity In that respect, UN-ESCWA, in close cooperation with FAO-RNE and ACSAD, engaged member States in capacity building activities aimed at assisting policy makers in the formulation of adequate national and local strategies and development plans, thus leading to adopting appropriate measures to face climate change. This practice of informed decision making through enhanced technical capacity contribute to anchoring the science-policy-interface approach within policy development.
    The proposed organizers:
    ESCWA (UN)
    ACSAD (RO)
    FAO (UN)
    MC
    Expected outcome
    The session is to serve as a platform for exchanging experiences and ideas while benefiting from regional and national lessons learned on monitoring and assessing climate change impacts on water availability and crop production to better inform decision-making
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Food security and climate change
    Other information
    Strengthen food security can be done through informed agricultural policy recommendations that are based on scientific evidence and that aim to increase the resilience of the agriculture sector to climate change through improved agriculture production and productivity.

    Objective
    The main objective of the session will be to out-door the project “Long-term Europe-Africa Partnership on Food and Nutrition Security and Sustainable Agriculture” (LEAP4FNSSA), and explore how African and European Countries can join into the initiative in order to support implementation and impact and avoid fragmentation. The panelists will discuss the issue with respect to how to increase synergies and improve on impact of science and innovation on sustainable agriculture. The panelists will be coming from academia, policy and practice. The discussion should help in expanding the number of countries involved in the R&I Partnership on Food and Nutrition Security and Sustainable Agriculture, and to strengthen alignment of research and innovation initiatives to the strategic goals of countries and to the Comprehensive African Agricultural Development Program (CAADP). The discussion should also reflect on how best to tackle multi stakeholder engagement so that the generated research is translated into practice.
    The proposed organizers:
    University of Hohenheim (AC)
    International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) (AR)
    Forum on Agricultural Research for Africa (FARA) (RO)
    Expected outcome
    a) Show the added value of joined forces in research and innovation policies, of impact and contribution to the SDGs
    b) Help policy makers to understand the structures and the potential of participating in the EU-AU partnership on FNSSA
    c) Generate excitement about multi-stakeholder approaches in research and innovation programs
    d) Promote the concept of alignment to country and regional strategic goals.
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Guidelines on Responsible Investments In Agriculture and food systems - Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition - The Global Strategic Framework for Food Security

    Objective
    To advance on tackling the multiple burden of malnutrition agenda and to contribute to the fulfillment of global commitments as those stated on the Rome Declaration and the framework of the United Nations Decade of Action for Nutrition and recommendations of the Nutrition and Food Systems Report by the HLPE of CFS
    The proposed organizers:
    Ministry of Health of Brazil (MC)
    Ministry of Citizenship of Brazil (MC)
    National Education Development Fund of Brazil (MC)
    Expected outcome
    The expected outcome of the side event is a greater knowledge regarding the policies, initiatives and cost effective measures to prevent childhood obesity. The exchange of experiences among partners will result in the identification of challenges and best practices that can be helpful to other countries and relevant actors to tackling obesity in childhood
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Nutrition and food systems (2020) - Social protection for food security

    Objective
    1. Showcase positive examples of agroecological approaches and sustainable food systems transformations across regions, sectors and scales
    2. Describe the transformative patterns and enabling pathways across agroecology and sustainable food system initiatives and their link to the global policy agenda
    3. Explain and introduce pathways for sustainable food systems transformations
    The proposed organizers:
    Global Alliance for the Future of Food and AgroEcology Fund - PF
    FAO, UN Environment - UN
    Biovision Foundation for Ecological Development, Hivos, WWF - CS
    Zambia Government - MC
    Federal Office for Agriculture, Switzerland - MC
    Expected outcome
    1. Improved understanding of the evidence related to agroecological approaches and sustainable food systems
    2. Strengthened linkages between agroecology, sustainable food systems and the SDGs, linking up climate, biodiversity, food and nutrition security.
    3. Shared frameworks for supporting the policy and practice of agroecology and sustainable food systems transformation 4. Deeper understanding of the tools available, including the One Planet Network Collaborative Framework for Sustainable Food Systems Transformation, and the Global Alliance for the Future Transformation Toolkit
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    1. Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems.
    2. Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition (2017).
    3. Voluntary Guidelines to support the progressive realization of the right to adequate food in the context of the national food security.
    4. Food security and climate change.
    5. Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems.
    6. Voluntary guidelines on the responsible governance of tenure of land, fisheries and forests in the context of national food security - (VGGT 2012).
    7. HLPE report on “Agroecology and other innovative approaches for sustainable agriculture and food systems that enhance food security and nutrition”.
    8. Development of Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition.
    9. Connecting Smallholders to Markets (CFS 43, 2016)
    Other information
    https://www.oneplanetnetwork.org/resource/collaborative-framework-food-systems-transformation-multi-stakeholder-pathway-sustainable

    Objective
    We hope to establish a "Good Food Index" to guide the organizers of conferences and events to practice environmental, biodiversity and climate-friendly food supply. This index will be based on plant-based diet, fully considering the factors of biodiversity and climate change, so that any conference organizers, catering entities can easily use it for evaluation. It is not only delicious, beneficial to human health, taken animal welfare into considerations, greatly reducing food waste and plastic pollution, but also promotes the United Nations sustainable development goals (SDGs) and supports small-sized farmers.
    The proposed organizers:
    China Biodiversity Conservation and Green Development Foundation (CS)
    Expected outcome
    The idea of "Good Food Index" will be fully discussed with a prelimanary draft ready, aiming to form a practical Index easy for use and assessment. And best practices will be shared.
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?

    Objective
    This side-event will bring to Rome good practices from around the world on how the Right to Food Guidelines are being implemented to further the progressive realization of the right to food and the achievement of SDG2, from a multitude of (non-traditional) stakeholders: national human rights commissions, right to food observatories, consumer organizations, and parliamentarians. Their stories will be able to increase awareness on the different ways this human right can be turned into reality for all and its intrinsic connection to SDG2 (as well as other SDGs)
    The proposed organizers:
    Spain/AECID (MC - Member Country)
    FAO (UN - UN Bodies)
    Right to Food Observatory in Spain (AC - Academia)
    National Human Right Commissioner - Nepal (OT - Other)
    Pan Africa Parliamentary Alliance for FSN - Uganda (OT - Other)
    Expected outcome
    The event will show how different stakeholders can promote the RTFG and hence contribute to the achievement of the SDGs. The event wishes to keep the momentum created by CFS45 GTE on the RTFG, alive and which put CFS at the center of the policy dialogue and soft monitoring of this voluntary instrument. 2019 marks a number of important anniversaries, which brought the organizers of this side-event to the conclusion that a 15 year review of how these Guidelines are being implemented in the context of the SDGs was necessary and useful to continue ensuring commitment towards this CFS policy product.
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    The Right to Food Guidelines as well as all subsequent Voluntary Guidelines which stemmed out of the RTFG.
    Other information
    This side-event will be informed by a report entitled '15 years Review of the implementation of the Right to Food Guideline' prepared by the Right to Food Team in FAO with the financial support of the Government of Spain and to be launched just before CFS46.

    Objective
    To understand pastoral mobility in a changing environment, to discuss the new dynamics that constrain pastoral mobility, to discuss and outline the importance pastoral mobility as an asset for regional economies and societies
    The proposed organizers:
    FAO (UN - UN Bodies)
    FAO (UN)
    Expected outcome
    An understanding of why pastoral mobility is key in addressing the challenges of food security in pastoral areas, migration in pastoral systems and achieving sustainable pastoralism
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Nutrition and food systems - Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA)- Food security and climate change - Voluntary guidelines on the responsible governance of tenure (VGGT)- Land tenure and international investments in agriculture
    Other information
    Pastoral mobility's role in achieving economic sustainability for pastoralists and food security and nutrition for populations around has not been highlighted.

    Objective
    Sustainable food systems are vital to our survival going forward. But communicating the stories of the people and ideas behind the systems, which will keep our planet nourished and prepared to face increasing climate and weather challenges, is just as important. If we look at these topics from a storyteller’s perspective, we can not only help raise the awareness of sustainable food systems, nutrition issues, and global food security, but we can inspire the next generation of leaders. These are the future leaders who will study, participate, invent, and invest in sustainable food systems. This session, hosted by the George Washington University’s School of Media and Public Affairs, through the Planet Forward environmental storytelling initiative, will bring together both young and expert storytellers alike, as well as agribusiness and/or nonprofit leaders, to discuss key sustainability and science communication skills, plus the challenges faced with this type of communication and how to overcome them.
    The proposed organizers:
    George Washington University / Planet Forward (AC)
    Other (OT)
    Expected outcome
    Learn storytelling tips and techniques to help share information about sustainable food systems, nutrition issues, and global food security. Explore common roadblocks in storytelling and ways to overcome these challenges. Focus on inspiring stories of innovations and solutions that encourage action
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    In support of SDG, Goal 17: Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development. This side event will help to enhance global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries. Other CFS policies and recommendation supported by this side event will be The Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition (GSF 2017) Food security and climate change (CFS 39: 2012), How to increase food security and smallholder sensitive investments in agriculture (CFS 37: 2011)

    Objective
    1. Showcase effectiveness of improved post-harvest management and storage at household level
    2. Raise awareness about hermetic (air-tight) storage
    3. Share experiences and lessons from scale-up. Testimonies from smallholder farmer, private sector manufacturer and distributor
    The proposed organizers:
    WFP (UN) Italy (MC)
    ETH Zurich (AC) Switzerland (MC)
    AgroZ (PS) Tanzania (TZ)
    Expected outcome
    1. Awareness created about the potential of improved post-harvest management and storage at household level in reducing losses (to almost zero), improving incomes and nutrition.
    2. Strengthen collaborations with donors, private sector and governments to advance the WFP Zero Food Loss Initiative.
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    1. Food Losses and Waste in the Context of Sustainable Food Systems (CFS 41, 2014)
    2. Investing in smallholder agriculture for food security (CFS 40, 2013).
    3. Food security and climate change.
    4. Connecting Smallholders to Markets (CFS 43, 2016)
    Other information
    Given the increasing awareness of both the massive negative impact of post-harvest losses, and effective, sustainable solutions that overcome that challenge, the World Food Programme created in 2016 the WFP Global Post-Harvest Knowledge and Operation Centre (Post-Harvest KNOC). The WFP Post-Harvest KNOC has supported 17 countries across Africa since its inception and from 150 farmers in Uganda in 2014, more than 370,882 farming families have made the choice to participate in the Zero Food Loss Initiative. Why? The impact at the household level has been nothing short of transformative: (1) reduction of post-harvest food losses by 90-100% through simple technology and change in behaviour; (2) Improvement in family nutrition and health (food availability and a decrease in aflatoxins); (3) a 2x to 3x increase in household income by preventing losses and selling at times advantageous to the smallholder families, instead of being forced to sell at harvest to avoid greater losses , and (4) an immediate improvement of food security, in particular in lean seasons . ETH Zurich independent research in Tanzania showed an immediate 1/3 reduction in the number of food insecure families once they began using hermetic storage. An important element of the Zero Food Loss success and scale is that farmers make a choice – they are participants, not aid recipients. The 2016 MIT Study on Scaling Hermetic Storage also highlighted an additional Zero Food Loss benefit, which the Post-harvest KNOC believes is critical to the sustainability of the impact. Given that women are responsible for most harvest activities, and all of the food preparation in Africa, shifting market power into their hands has a substantial impact on women’s socio-economic status.

    Objective
    Access to real-time information on the number of people suffering from insufficient food intake in accessible and hard to reach areas of the world is key for WFP and the humanitarian community to take fast decisions on where and when to deliver food and other life-saving supplies and services. Lacking this information would result in the rapid deterioration of emerging crisis situations and the onset of famine. First-hand survey data is currently the main tool that WFP uses to monitor the food security situation world-wide. However, this data may not always be available on a regular basis and about all hard-to-reach areas. To bridge this gap, WFP's is developing predictive analytics solutions that allow to estimate food insecurity in places where no ground-truth data is currently available, as well as to eventually forecast how the situation may change in the future. The goal of this event is to present and discuss the progress made so far in this emerging field - from the 2017 Hackathon where Nielsen data scientists used WFP data to create a model to predict monthly changes in food security in Yemen and Nigeria, to the recent efforts with Alibaba Cloud to build a global predictive model.
    The proposed organizers:
    WFP (UN)
    Nielsen (PS)
    Expected outcome
    This side event will allow the food security community to learn about the most recent advances in real-time food security monitoring due to the integration of machine learning driven solutions. It will also provide an opportunity for an open debate on the related challenges and gaps, and on how humanitarian, academic and private sector stakeholders can work together to find shared solutions
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA) - Food security and climate change

    Objective
    1. Illustrate a framework to track investments for food and nutrition security that complies with SDG2 indicators;
    2. Provide a periodic (annual) scorecard for such investments;
    3. Advocate for greater transparency and effectiveness of SDG2 related investments based on the accountability framework.
    The proposed organizers:
    Center for International Relations (CS/NGO)
    Highlife Foundation (PF)
    Imperial College (AC)
    Proposed 2 MC from Global North and South each
    Expected outcome
    1. New framework to track SDG 2 investments
    2. Advocacy to hold donors, governments, multilaterals and private sector accountable for SDG2 investments
    3. Periodic publication of scorecard on Center for International Relations website to ensure CFS policy guidelines gain regular traction in all countries
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems (CFS 2014) - Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition (2017)

    Objective
    This event is directly contributing to the implementation agenda of CFS 45’s discussions on multi-stakeholder partnerships for food security and nutrition, with a focus on their role in research and development, and scaling up and out of innovations. In the follow-up from the CFS discussions, this event could make an even stronger and concrete case for the creation and funding of sustainable national and international partnership initiatives along the research-development-implementation at scale continuum and to envisage linkages and synergies between them. It therefore contributes to the stakeholders’ coordination facilitation and knowledge sharing roles of the CFS.
    The proposed organizers:
    CGIAR (MS)
    FAO (UN)
    Expected outcome
    1. Knowledge shared and lessons learned on multi-stakeholder partnerships as catalyst of research and innovation to achieve impact at scale and realize the right to adequate food for all
    2. Identification of ways and means to improve the articulation of multi-stakeholder partnerships with major international and regional initiatives, such as the SDGs, Paris Agreement, Addis Ababa Agenda Action, CAADP and S3A, along the research to development and action continuum
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems (RAI) - Investing in smallholder agriculture for food security - Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the Framework of the 2030 Agenda (2018) - How to increase food security and smallholder sensitive investments in agriculture - Sustainable agriculture development for food security and nutrition
    Other information
    The side-event will be an open and interactive event fostering dialogue, learning and knowledge exchange. It will feature a series of 4-5 presentations by panelists (FAO, CGIAR, country representatives, and other partners) followed by an interactive discussion with the audience

    Objective
    We are launching a Commission on Sustainable Agricultural Intensification which will establish a process to deliver consensus on how to embark on the necessary transition pathways towards agricultural production systems that can deliver healthy, nutritious food in a sustainable way, which builds resilience to shocks and stresses, such as from climate change. The objectives are to build a better understanding of how to better link the food security, nutrition, climate and sustainable agricultural intensification communities and what might be the necessary policies and practices that should be put in place to deliver this.
    The proposed organizers:
    CGIAR (MS)
    Expected outcome
    The first stage towards building a coalition of the willing to contribute evidence and solutions that will have real world impacts and deliver a food and nutrition secure future. This will include identification of collaboration partners and key sources of evidence around real world solutions that lead to SAI at scale and which also deliver multiple benefits (e.g. resilience, nutrition, equity).
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Agroecological Approaches - Nutrition and Food Systems - Food Security and Climate Change- Investing in Smallholder Agriculture for Food Security - Multi-stakeholder Partnerships to Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the 2030 Agenda.
    Other information
    We are submitting a full side event proposal

    Objective
    The aim of this event is tow fold: to showcase the longstanding and fruitful collaboration between the FAO Nutrition and Food System division (ESN) and the German Federal Ministry of Agriculture (BMEL) on the conception, development and dissemination of the Nutrition Education in Action course (ENACT) and its version for francophone countries ENAF; and (ii) to share the innovative features of this course and the results and the experience of 19 universities that are offering it in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), 21 are planning to adopt it and more than 2 000 students who have been trained so far. The side event will provide a brief overview of the collaboration between FAO and BMEL, which lead to the development of ENACT. This started in 2011 with a needs assessment (NEAC) conducted in seven countries in SSA that revealed that professional training for effective nutrition education is almost non-existent. On the ground of this assessment, the ENACT course was developed (2011-2015) to promote long-term improvements in diet through an active, hands-on approach based on identified needs, with attention to social and environmental contexts, all relevant sectors and the whole food cycle (production, processing, marketing, consumption). The thorough piloting process both in Anglophone and Francophone countries as well as the strategy for its sustainability (through the ongoing BMEL funded Strengthening Capacities on Nutrition Sensitive Agriculture and Food Systems project) will also be discussed. The second part of the side event will be devoted to make attendees understand what exactly food and nutrition education is about through a quick presentation and examples which will lead to the description of the course and its original features. Finally the floor will be given to those who are implementing on the ground and who will share their experiences as training of trainers, teachers and students of the course. A project final evaluation was conducted in 2016. While some conclusions and recommendations pointed out some areas for improvement, they also highlighted that the nutrition education approach of ENACT and ENAF was found relevant and consistent in addressing the needs identified in the NEAC survey. The innovative pedagogical approaches to nutrition education were appropriate in addressing the gaps and needs in the piloting countries and suitable for the target groups. The quality of the approach and materials was rated as excellent. Given that the course is vastly spreading and receives acknowledgment and appreciation from universities both within and outside SSA, we would like to use the opportunity of this side event to share the innovative features of this course and the results and the experience of universities that are offering it so far.
    The proposed organizers:
    German Federal Ministry of Agriculture (BMEL)
    FAO (UN)
    Expected outcome
    The expected outcome of the side event is, as part of the drive to promote both nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive policies and programmes, to: (i) provide greater information and understanding of the ENACT/ENAF course, including the importance of food and nutrition education to achieve the above mentioned objectives; (ii) share the results of the dissemination and adoption of the course within Sub-Saharan countries, to enable colleagues to advocate for the dissemination and use of ENACT and ENAF; (iii) hear from the audience feedback and inputs on how to ensure even greater sustainability of the course an identify new opportunities for dissemination.
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    ENACT puts into practice the recommendations of the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) meeting that was held in Rome in 2014, and in particular Recommendation 20 to: “Build nutrition skills and capacity to undertake nutrition education activities”. There is abundant evidence that in order to reshape agriculture and food systems and make them sustainable and nutrition-sensitive, a demand for healthy and sustainable foods needs to be generated, and that is why effective food and nutrition education is essential to achieve this goal. Also, the FAO’s Programme Evaluation of MOPAN (Multilateral Organisation Performance Assessment Report) 2017- 2018 highlighted that the ENAF/ENACT projects made efficient use of their financial resources resulting in good value for money.

    Objective
    FAO has a pivotal role to ensure transformations ins agriculture by drawing and facilitating farmer's access to Agriculture 4.0. On 19th January 2019, the agriculture ministers of 74 nations adopted a number of resolutions stated in a political communiqué about digitalization in agriculture issued during the Global Forum for Food and Agriculture (GFFA). The collective voice of the ministers emphasized the need for an International Digital Council that will take action on global digitalization of agriculture. With the BMEL support, the foundation for the Council is already in place. A first consultation meeting with multi-stakeholders for the establishment of the Council was held on 12-13th of June. As a follow-up, the second consultation meeting, which is crucial for the future design and functionality of the Council. The Side Event objective is to organize the second consultation meeting as it brings together multi-stakeholders to puzzle the elements of the new mechanisms for functionality of the International Digital Council for Food and Agriculture. The Side Event provides not only as a unique premise for organizing the second consultation meeting, but it also offers possibilities to draw a future alongside with establishing reliable partnerships with various multi-stakeholders.
    The proposed organizers:
    FAO (UN)
    Expected outcome
    Approach interested stakeholders in the Agriculture 4.0 and nurture reliable partnerships, especially for a functional International Digital Council; Raise the role of International Digital Council as a reliable mechanism for sustainable food security and nutrition - a promoter, capacity-builder and ambassador/facilitator for transitory process to Agriculture 4.0; Incubate precious vision and knowledge from various multi-stakeholders on the mechanism and process how the Council will act after being established; Sketch the road-map and strategic approach on how the Council will be established and operated; Acknowledge and inform participants on the role of International Digital Council on food nutrition and security.
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Nutrition and food systems (2020) - Multi-stakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the Framework of the 2030 Agenda (2018) - Gender, food security and nutrition - Connecting smallholders to markets - Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems (RAI).
    Other information
    The Side Event is about digital approach for agriculture. Being new and in the same time imperiously necessary, digital agriculture have to be on the future agenda of CFS, by distinguishing it from innovations & technologies in agriculture

    Objective
    This side event, organized by the informal group of Friends of the Right to Food in Rome, will provide a space for sharing experiences and proposals in the integration of the right to adequate food as a guiding principle for the elaboration of public policies. It will start off with a synthesis of the multiple challenges that need to be addressed, and will then discuss the key questions with experiences from Member States, including: 1) Is the progressive realization of the Right to Food a way to also address malnutrition challenges, especially undernutrition? 2) What support is expected from the CFS, the RBAs and other specialized UN agencies such as the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights?
    The proposed organizers:
    Friends of the Right to Food in Rome (OT - Other) (MC)
    Expected outcome
    The core elements of experiences that will be shared at the Side event can help participants to better understand how the progressive realization of the right to adequate food can be used to address malnutrition challenges, especially undernutrition, through public policies and which kind of support is needed from CFS, RBA and other specialized UN agencies for strengthening this approach. Another expected outcome of the Side Event is that outstanding experiences and ideas shared in this occasion might inform the further process towards the Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition.
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    Right to Food Guidelines - Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition (ongoing)
    Other information
    The Friends of the Right to Food in Rome is an informal group of delegates from 16 Permanent Representations to the RBAs (Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Spain, South Africa, and Switzerland).

    Objective
  • To raise awareness about nutritional impact of small-scale fisheries and their contributions and stake in food security
  • To build partnerships for integrating the CFS instruments in the road map for IYAFA 2022
  • To inform the process of developing the Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition on small-scale artisanal fisheries and aquaculture food systems and contributions to nutrition
  • The proposed organizers:
    International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty Fisheries Working Group (CS)
    Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UN)
    FAO (UN)
    Expected outcome
    This civil society-led event will integrate the interests of small-scale fisheries and aquaculture in the CFS Civil Society Mechanism. It will also strengthen the links between CFS instruments and the SSF Guidelines. Additionally, the event will aim to include CFS and its instruments in the planning road map for IYAFA 2022
    Which CFS policy guidelines or recommendations will this Side Event cover?
    HLPE Report 2014 Sustainable fisheries and aquaculture for food security and nutrition - CFS Policy Recommendation on Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture for Food Security and Nutrition