SE013 Agroforestry, an agro-ecological pathway for SDG2: A multistakeholder event to discuss ways to scale-up agroforestry

Organizers

  • CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry
  • Swedish International Agricultural Network Initiative
  • Vi Agroforestry

The HLPE report on agroecology and other innovation has shown that agriculture and agricultural research must evolve towards systemic approaches embracing economic, social and environmental objectives. Agroforestry is one of these approaches delivering benefits at local and global level. It is a range of exemplary systems by which agriculture can concretely show its contribution to SDG2 on food security, nutrition and sustainable agriculture, but also to a range of other objectives.

The side event will gather a multi-stakeholder panel to discuss, in the perspective of the HLPE report and the CFS recommendations, the opportunities, but also challenges to scale-up agroforestry. The objective will be to share experiences and lessons learned amongst a diverse set of panelists and with the room on options and solutions in terms of technical, institutional, and policy support to the development of agroforestry, in the perspective of the realization of the SDGs.

Key speakers/presenters

  • Vincent Gitz, Director, CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA)
  • Per Callenberg, State Secretary for the Minister of Rural Affairs, Ministry of Enterprise and Innovation, Sweden
  • Fergus Sinclair, HLPE, FTA, ICRAF
  • Esther Penunia, Secretary General of AFA (Asian Farmers’ Association for Sustainable Rural Development), Philippines and Civil Society Mechanism of the CFS
  • Nur Amalia, National Social Forestry Working Group, Ministry of Environment and Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia
  • Ewald Rametsteiner, Deputy Director, Forestry Department, FAO
  • Caroline Musee, Vi-agroforestry
  • Moderator: Maria Schultz, Agroforestry Network


Main themes/issues discussed

The HLPE report on Agroecology and other innovations has shown that agriculture and agricultural research must evolve towards systemic approaches embracing economic, social and environmental objectives.

Agroforestry is one of these approaches delivering various benefits at local and global level. It is a range of exemplary systems by which agriculture can concretely show its contribution to SDG2 on food security, nutrition and sustainable agriculture, as well as to a range of other objectives. Different experiences, opportunities and lessons learned were discussed amongst the panelists and with the room on how agroforestry can be an entry point for agroecology and the realization of SDG2 and other SDGs.

Recommendations and key actions in terms of technical, institutional, and multi-stakeholder policy support were identified  to leverage the potential of agroforestry and to address  challenges to scale-up agroforestry at broader levels.  


Summary of key points

There is still a lack of internationally agreed definition of Agroforestry

FAO, CFS, IFAD, COFO, COAG and CGIAR are the platforms that need to coordinate the global work on agroforestry

Efforts to scale up agroforestry are essential

The functional diversity generated by trees is immense and trees represent an infrastructural investment in the future (soil, fodder, canopy levels, climate buffering, etc.)

Co-creation of knowledge – also through multi-stakeholder partnerships – is of paramount importance to scale up agroforestry

Agroforestry can address at once enhanced and diverse FSN, enhanced and diverse biodiversity (in conjunction with agriculture) and enhanced carbon sequestration, thus acting as a climate change mitigator

We can learn from best practices (see how Indonesia has adopted the ASEAN guidelines on agroforestry)

Value chains from Agroforestry systems need to be “identified”, recognized, explored and developed for the successful scaling up of agroforestry

Agroforestry can act as a safety net (economic, against climate shocks, as repository of cultural and traditional practices, supporting communities, involving youth, etc.)
    

Key take away messages

Agroforestry is an excellent entry point for agroecology  it needs to be exploited as much as possible

Agroecology and agroforestry are key for the realization of SDG2 and other SDGs

Agroforestry needs to be high on the political agenda

There is a diversity of systems in agroforestry that needs to be acknowledged and there is a need for more knowledge on them

Knowledge of agroforestry systems needs to be preserved and needs to be continuously co-generated

Slow variables (that given inertia change slowly with time but are important for the socio-economic-environment system) are fundamental, these need to enter into the equation when investments are considered

FTA and SIANI believe that research is not only R4D (for development) but rather research in development.

We need to leverage potential of organizations like IFAD and FAO to upscale agroforestry practices (farmers are already using agroforestry practices, when they see the potential and the results)

There is need to do more research (with clear metrics) and strong advice on policy, to upscale agroforestry and agroecology at a systemic level.

CFS 46 Side Event: SE013 Agroforestry, an agro-ecological pathway

 

The contents of this page is provided by the Side Event organizers and does not reflect the opinion of CFS