SE059 Putting food security and nutrition at the heart of climate action. Climate change, food security and nutrition: a key nexus for a sustainable future

Organizers

  • FAO
  • WFP
  • IFAD
  • New Zealand

The Rome-based agencies (RBAs) are committed to ensuring that food security and good nutrition are available to a growing global population, especially in the context of climate change. Climate change already affects all dimensions of food security as well as the determinants of malnutrition. In order to achieve both SDG 2 and the Paris Agreement, food security and nutrition (FSN) need to be placed at the heart of climate action and governance.

Climate change, food security and nutrition are fundamentally interconnected and share overlapping agendas and common objectives. Promoting sustainable food systems that ensure healthy diets require strengthening the resilience and adaptation of agricultural sectors to climate change, as well as early actions to reduce climate risks. The objective of this side event is to highlight the importance of integrating food security and nutrition into climate change action.

The side event will bring together key stakeholders from member countries, UNFCCC, civil society and private sector to exchange views on how to scale up the interlinkages between food security, nutrition and climate change.

Key speakers/presenters

  • René Castro Salazar, Assistant Director-General, Climate, Biodiversity, Land and Water Department, FAO
  • Anthony Simpson, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of New Zealand to FAO, IFAD and WFP
  • Gianluca Ferrera, Senior Programme and Policy Advisor, Food systems and Smallholders Support, WFP
  • Margarita Astralaga, Director of Environment, Climate, Gender and Social Inclusion, IFAD
  • Máximo Torero Cullen, Assistant Director General, Economic and Social Development Department, FAO
  • Ramona Duminicioiu, La Via Campesina 
  • Els de Groene, Global Nutrition Director, Unilever
  • Zitouni Ould-Dada, Deputy-Director, Climate and Environment Division, FAO

Main themes/issues discussed  

Climate change is already affecting all dimensions of food security and nutrition as well as agriculture. The effects of climate change such as more extreme weather events undermine sustainable development, food security and quality, and the end of hunger. At the same time, the global population, the consumption demand and the pressure on natural resources are all on the rise. Climate change, food security and nutrition are considered to be fundamentally interconnected and share common challenges and objectives. Promoting sustainable food systems that ensure healthy diets requires strengthening the resilience and adaptation of agricultural sectors to climate change.  In this context, the side event addressed the role of different stakeholders, including the Rome-based Agencies, countries, farmers and private sector, in tackling the interlinkages between food security, nutrition and climate change and ensuring that food security and nutrition are placed at the heart of the global climate action. The panel discussed solutions to feed a growing population while maintaining food security and a healthy planet. 

Summary of key points  

Through country examples and solutions adopted by key stakeholders, the event showed how climate change, food security and nutrition can be tackled in an integrated way. It demonstrated that a better integration between agriculture, environment, nutrition, health and gender is crucial to address this nexus. In particular, the agricultural production and resilience of agricultural sectors need to be increased, food loss and waste need to be reduced, nutrition and quality of food need to be enhanced and GHG emissions from agriculture need to be cut. Farmers must play a major role in contributing to nutritious and healthy diets, and value chains must have a nutrition focus with diversified crops. Most importantly, food needs to be produced in a sustainable way that is also profitable to farmers. Smallholder farmers must receive a greater recognition from governments as being most affected by climate change while also holding solutions to the climate and food crisis, including through their shift to more productive and efficient farming practices through innovation and through agro-ecological food production. The role of dietary shifts is an important factor, including the need for behavior change in consumers and food manufacturers to promote consumption and production of more nutritious food, using fewer resources. 

Key take away messages 

Climate change, food security and nutrition are closely interlinked. Addressing this nexus is key to building climate resilient agricultural sectors while ensuring food security, including for the most vulnerable communities In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, the adoption of a range of sustainable agriculture practices is needed to increase productivity, increase efficiency, reduce negative environmental impacts, improve rural livelihoods, and reduce GHG emissions. Farmers, producers and consumers will play a central role in the move towards more sustainable food systems that ensure sustainability and the availability of nutritious food for all, with a greater focus on gender needed. Agricultural and climate change policies at all levels should involve farmers from the outset, in order for solutions to be tailored to local contexts, to utilize farmer knowledge and to improve the chance of successful implementation. Building capacity in countries as well as robust partnerships across food systems will be essential to drive better climate change, food security and nutrition outcomes. In order to feed the planet and protect it against climate change, a paradigm shift in how food is produced is needed, including considering the role of food waste, trade policies, sustainable agricultural approaches, incentives and consumers choices.  

CFS 46 Side Event: SE059 Putting food security and nutrition at the heart of climate action. Climate change, food security and nutrition

 

The contents of this page is provided by the Side Event organizers and does not reflect the opinion of CFS