SE067 Partnering for Change: Multistakeholder Partnerships and CFS

Organizers

  • Private Sector Mechanism
  • Rabobank
  • European Union (EU)
  • Syngenta

A successful sustainable development agenda requires partnerships between governments, the private sector and civil society. These inclusive partnerships built upon principles and values, a shared vision, and shared goals that place people and the planet at the centre, are needed at the global, regional, national and local level. The criticality of partnerships has been gaining recognition in the context of development strategies and international policy-making. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in particular SDG 17, calls for a revitalized and enhanced global partnership, that brings together governments, civil society, the private sector, the UN system, and other actors, and mobilizes all available resources to achieve the SDGs ambitious targets.

Given the critical need for cross-sectoral and holistic approaches, pooling together the resources, knowledge and expertise of different stakeholders in the achievement of food security and nutrition, this side event will aim to encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Key speakers/presenters

Welcome and Introduction to the discussion

  • Willem Olthof, European Commission

Opening Remarks

  • H.E. Mario Arvelo, Chairman of CFS and Ambassador to the Dominican Republic
  • Vincent Doumeizel, Lloyd’s Register
  • Scott Ratzan, Business Partnership for Sustainable Development
  • Anu Paasiaro, Yara
  • Alexia Machera, Ahold Delhaize
  • Christine Heffernan, Tesco
  • Graeme Taylor, Syngenta
  • Hellen Onyango, Farmer
  • Adrian van der Knaap, World Food Programme
  • Katarina Eriksson, Tetra Laval Food for Development
  • William Moore, Eleanor Crook Foundation

Main themes/issues discussed 

There has never been a higher need to tackle the challenges of zero hunger and sustainable agriculture. The side event discussed new multistakeholder partnerships being built and announced in the context of the CFS. A successful sustainable development agenda requires partnerships between governments, the private sector and civil society. These inclusive partnerships built upon principles and values, a shared vision, and shared goals that place people and the planet at the centre, are needed at the global, regional, national and local level.

The criticality of partnerships has been gaining recognition in the context of development strategies and international policy-making. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in particular SDG 17, calls for a revitalized and enhanced global partnership, that brings together governments, civil society, the private sector, the UN system, and other actors, and mobilizes all available resources to achieve the SDGs ambitious targets.

Given the critical need for cross-sectoral and holistic approaches, pooling together the resources, knowledge and expertise of different stakeholders in the achievement of food security and nutrition, this side event promoted effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Summary of key points

Multistakeholder partnerships should be high on the agenda for the Committee on World Food Security to continue building as we progress to 2030. It is essential to have strong public-private partnerships in order to put meaningful progress on the Sustainable Development Goals.

Vincent

  • New focus on food – pilot project on seaweed production – grow seaweed in offshore areas
  • Seaweed is a great source of protein, which can cut meat consumption by 99%
  • LR Foundation to support seagriculture
  • Offshore wind farm areas
  • Can be used for packaging, protein, medicines, energy and water production

Scott

  • Incubator lab have a principle approach directed to appropriate ideas
    Anu

Alexia

  • Ahold Delhaize is a founding member of 10x20x30 initiative, which brings together 10 global good retailers that will each engage with 20 of their priority suppliers to halve their rates of food loss and waste by 2030

Christine

  • SDG 12.3
  • Champions set out to target, measure and act on that data
  • No food sent to landfill in UK since 2009

Graeme

  • There has never been a higher need to tackle the challenges of #ZeroHunger
  • Forum for food and agriculture – network of 100 ag innovators

Hellen

  • Turn key areas – quality and quantity
  • Farmers know when to plant it and how to get a productive crop
  • Farm to market alliances are linking farmers to resources
  • Direct link between fertilizer and output
  • Quality – knowledge of how to handle their grain after it is harvested. Used to have losses. 
  • Be more active in sourcing for the market
  • Lobby for policies to support market stability
  • If the farmer has a product that is better quality they can look for more partnerships outside

Adrian

  • Partnerships should be like a marriage
  • Love and attraction is missing – in every partnership something will go wrong. If you don’t have love and attraction you will have a hard time standing up for each other
  • We want to make markets better for smallholder farmers.
  • What partnerships do we need in what circumstances?

Katarina

  • We want to make sure dairy customers have more and better milk.
  • Want to know we have a good local partner
  • Want to attract partners that can help us scale up
  • Market driven – partnerships are market driven based on needs and gaps
  • Working in their core business
  • There has to be long term view and a business model that is viable
  • Challenge: in the process of getting to a partnership, you need resources on all sides
  • Our counterpart also needs resources to develop these partnerships
  • UN, governments, etc have to invest in the resources to make this happen
  • It’s important to look at how the farmers develop

William

  • Where are we trying to go in the long run?
  • We don’t need more partnerships alone, we need BETTER QUALITY partnerships
  • By the nature of being multistakeholder – lots of transaction costs and time to come together. Makes achieving impact at the end more difficult.
  • Quality over quantity
  • Recipe for success – have a clear period of change from the outset. 2. Have something tangible that you are coming around on day 1. Something that every partner has to put real skin in the game on – committing real significant resources to in the beginning

Key take away messages

Herman

  • Ten years ago there was a different tone when talking about partnerships. Now the situation is much different—the idea has become main stream.
  • The concern is more about the quality of partnerships versus the quantity
  • There isn’t a lot of hard evidence about the effectiveness of partnerships. Now the question is focused on the indicators.
  • Partnerships are started with a default logic – we want to partner to increase the scale of what we think is working best. Let’s create more benefits, scale it, and that will mean development is upon us.
CFS 46 Side Event: SE067 Partnering for Change: Multistakeholder Partnerships and CFS

 

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