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Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture

FAQs

What is the Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture?

What is the Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture?

The Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture (KJWA) is a landmark agreement for the agriculture negotiations under the international climate convention as it emphasizes the key role of agriculture and food security in the international climate change agenda.

When was the decision adopted?

When was the decision adopted?

At the 23rd Conference of the Parties (COP) to the UNFCCC held in Bonn, Germany in November 2017. The agreement is the first substantive outcome and COP decision on agriculture, which has been under negotiation since 2011.

Why is the decision called Koronivia?

Why is the decision called Koronivia?

In honor of Fiji which held the COP23 Presidency, the decision was symbolically named after the Koronivia Research Station, Fiji’s only agricultural research institution.

What are the constituted bodies under the Convention that will contribute to the KJWA?

What are the constituted bodies under the Convention that will contribute to the KJWA?

Decision 4/CP.23 requests the SBSTA and the SBI to jointly address issues related to agriculture, working with constituted bodies under the Convention. There are seven constituted bodies under the Convention (listed in chronological order of creation): 

1.      the Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE)

2.      the Least Developed Countries Expert Group (LEG)

3.      the Technology Executive Committee (TEC)

4.      the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN)

5.      the Adaptation Committee (AC)

6.      the Standing Committee on Finance (SCF)

7.      the Paris Committee on Capacity Building (PCCB)

Which topics are included under the KJWA?

Which topics are included under the KJWA?

The decision lists elements to be included in the joint work of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), starting with but not limited to the following six:

(a)    Modalities for implementation of the outcomes of the five in-session workshops on issues related to agriculture and other future topics that may arise from this work;

(b)   Methods and approaches for assessing adaptation, adaptation co-benefits and resilience;

(c)    Improved soil carbon, soil health and soil fertility under grassland and cropland as well as integrated systems, including water management;

(d)   Improved nutrient use and manure management towards sustainable and resilient agricultural systems;

(e)    Improved livestock management systems;

(f)     Socioeconomic and food security dimensions of climate change in the agricultural sector.

The decision itself recognizes that other priority topics may be identified and discussed along the way.

How does the Koronivia road map forsee the organization of this joint work?

How does the Koronivia road map forsee the organization of this joint work?

The Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), initiated their joint consideration of the KJWA at their 48th session, held in Bonn, Germany, in April-May 2018. Prior to the session, Parties and observers were invited to make submissions sharing their views on the elements to be included in the joint work. On this basis, a road map to guide the KJWA was adopted at SB48. It provides for in-session workshops to be held on each of the six topics listed in Decision 4/CP.23, starting at SB49 in December 2018 and ending in 2020. At the subsidiary bodies’ request, the UNFCCC secretariat will: 

  • organize these workshops and encourage admitted observers to participate;
  • prepare a report on each workshop for consideration at the sessions of the SBI and the SBSTA following the sessions in conjunction with which the workshops took place, and;
  • invite representatives of the constituted bodies under the Convention to contribute to the work, and attend the workshops, in particular the first workshop on the modalities for implementation of the outcomes of the five in-session workshops held between 2013-16.

Parties and observers will be invited to submit their views on the subject to be discussed ahead of each workshop. At SB48, the SBSTA and the SBI took note of the importance of issues, including farmers, gender, youth, local communities and indigenous peoples, and encouraged Parties to take them into consideration when making submissions and during the workshops.

When are the Subsidiary Bodies due to report back to COP?

When are the Subsidiary Bodies due to report back to COP?

The subsidiary bodies are requested to report to the Conference of Parties (COP) on the progress and outcomes of the work, including on potential future topics, at its 26th session to be held in November 2020.

How does the KJWA relate to the Paris Agreement and NDCs?

How does the KJWA relate to the Paris Agreement and NDCs?

The Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture is not formally linked to the Paris Agreement or the NDCs. However, the adoption of the KJWA can be seen to demonstrate the increasing importance the international climate community has been placing on agriculture in recent years, including through the Paris Agreement and the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).

Some countries may choose to draw on the ongoing KJWA discussions to inform their NDCs in the agriculture sectors.

How are the agriculture sectors represented in the NDCs?

How are the agriculture sectors represented in the NDCs?

FAO undertook an analysis of the first round of Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs), representing 189 countries submitted by 29 July 2016. When considered together, 89 percent of these countries include agriculture and/or Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) in their mitigation commitments. 93 percent of countries that included an adaptation section in their INDC included adaptation in the agricultural sectors.

Was agriculture work undertaken by the Convention's subsidiary and constituted bodies prior to the KJWA?

Was agriculture work undertaken by the Convention's subsidiary and constituted bodies prior to the KJWA?

Yes. Agriculture was brought into the negotiations at COP 17 in 2011, when decision 2/CP.17 on the outcome of the work of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Long-term Cooperative Action under the Convention (AWG-LCA) requested the SBSTA to consider issues relating to agriculture with the aim of exchanging views.

Between 2013-2016, the SBSTA held five in-session workshops to provide opportunities for Parties to exchange their views on issues relating to agriculture.

How does the KJWA relate to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?

How does the KJWA relate to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?

The link between the UNFCCC and the SDGs is clearly stated in SDG 13 on Climate Action, which acknowledges “that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change.” Furthermore, the KJWA directly supports the objectives of a number of SDGs, including SDG1 (end poverty), SDG2 (zero hunger), SDG12 (sustainable production and consumption), and SDG15 (life on land).

What does the KJWA mean for farmers?

What does the KJWA mean for farmers?

In time, the KJWA could mobilize political will and commitment to provide targeted support to farmers on climate action in the agriculture sectors. Enhancing farmer’s knowledge on climate change and its impacts is an important first step. They need support to identify, select and apply locally-appropriate, management practices that help them build the resilience of their livelihoods.