Changement climatique

Publications

Type: Publications
Year: 2016

 

189 countries have submitted their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) and/or their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) to the UNFCCC. With the Paris Agreement having entered into force in November 2016, the INDCs/ NDCs will guide country-level climate action for the coming years. They include not only targets, but also concrete strategies for climate change mitigation and adaptation. FAO  has analyzed the INDCs/ NDCs  to assess the role of agriculture and land use, land use change and forestry (LULUCF) and the agriculture sectors (crops, livestock, fisheries and aquaculture, as well as forestry) in meeting national mitigation contributions and adaptation objectives, respectively. The results show that in all regions, these sectors will play a pivotal role in accomplishing the intended contributions and objectives for addressing the causes of and increasing resilience to climate change by 2030 and beyond. This INDCs analysis report provides an overview on how the agriculture sectors have been included in the INDCs/ NDCs. It outlines mitigation contributions with a particular focus on agriculture and LULUCF, vulnerabilities under climate change and priority areas and/or activities for adaptation in the agriculture sectors. Furthermore, this report summarizes information provided in the INDCs/ NDCs on Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA), mitigation-adaptation co-benefits and how countries have developed their INDCs and are planning to implement their NDCs. The aim of this analysis is to provide a basis for identifying priorities for international support for climate action in the agriculture sectors.

 

Type: Publications
Year: 2016

The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the effects of climate change on food security and nutrition, intended as its four dimensions, and to explore ways to reduce negative impacts through adaptation and resilience.

Type: Publications
Year: 2016

The pilot projects of the Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Programme of FAO in Kenya and the United Republic of Tanzania have promoted climate-smart agriculture (CSA) and have been integrated into ongoing development programmes. The objective of the pilot projects was to show that smallholder farmers can improve their livelihoods and increase their productivity and contribute to climate change mitigation at the same time. The approach was to develop packages of climate-smart agricultural practices based on participatory assessments and expert consultations, implement the selected practices using a variety of extension methods and evaluate their effects on yield, food security and their potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on farms and throughout the landscape. Farmers who participated in the MICCA pilot projects reported that the main benefits of CSA were higher yields, greater farm income and increased food availability. This is an indication that smallholder farmers can be an effective part of the response to climate change and make a meaningful contribution to reducing GHG emissions. Bringing sound, up-to-date evidence into decision-making processes can help shape policies that support CSA.

Type: Publications
Year: 2016
Cette publication présente les messages clés de la FAO sur le changement climatique et la sécurité alimentaire.
Elle inclut des exemples du travail de la FAO pour aider les pays à s’adapter aux effets du changement climatique sur les secteurs agricoles. Elle rassemble les connaissances de la FAO sur le changement climatique les plus récentes, y compris les instruments et les méthodologies utilisés pour soutenir les engagements et les plans d’actions sur le changement climatique.
 
Type: Publications
Year: 2016

March 2016 - Two important events - the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 and COP21 on development and climate change, led to unprecedented concrete global commitments being made to eradicate poverty by 2030 and promote environmental protection.

In this issue, we talk about these two conferences, while giving the floor to various development actors on the theme of gender in resilience and climate change. A series of articles makes up a dossier that highlights the important role played by marginalized rural community members, including women, in the fight against climate change and its consequences. This topic is also central to the work of FAO, and it is with great pleasure that we share not just the Organization’s results, but also a range of contributions made by our partners to initiatives, projects and challenges in this area.