Publications de FAO

Documents de travail sur la Gestion des resources naturelles et de l'environnement

No 61 - Take it or Leave it? Towards a Decision Support Tool on Sustainable Crop Residue Use 12 December 2014 In the last decade, the increased interest in bioenergy production has led to the need for improved crop residue management. Crop residues have historically been used for many other purposes: to sustain healthy soils for food production, as feed and bedding for livestock, and as raw material for heating and cooking. As the link between crop residue management and food security is evident, one needs to decide whether or to which extent the removal of crop residues for bioenergy production is possible. Building science-based decision support tools can guide stakeholders in this decision process. The study presents a first attempt in designing such a decision support tool for soil residue management. The study seeks to explore the effect of crop residue management on soil quality and yield, two crucial aspects for food security. More than 1 000 peer-reviewed journal papers of the past ten years were studied in order to assess (i) whether crop residue application is ssociated with higher soil organic carbon (SOC), (ii) whether it ameliorates soil structure and (iii) if the change in SOC related to residue application has a positive impact on yields. The findings of this report demonstrate that crop residue management has to be contextualized, suggesting the need for site-specific residue management schemes. in coarse soils located in tropical climates and in SOC-depleted soils located in temperate climates, crop residue removal is not advisable. [more]
No 60 - Pilot Testing of GBEP Sustainability Indicators for Bioenergy in Indonesia 12 December 2014 The Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) has produced a set of twenty-four indicators for the assessment and monitoring of bioenergy sustainability at the national level. The GBEP indicators are intended to inform policymakers about the environmental, social and economic sustainability aspects of the bioenergy sector in their country and guide them towards policies that foster sustainable development.. FAO, which is among the founding members of the Global Bioenergy Partnership, tested the indicators in Colombia and Indonesia, with generous support from the International Climate Initiative (ICI) of the Federal Ministry of the Environment, Natural Resource, and Nuclear Safety of Germany. This report presents the results of the testing of the GBEP indicators in Indonesia. The testing provided Indonesia with an understanding of how to establish the means of a long- term, periodic monitoring of its domestic bioenergy sector based on the GBEP indicators. Such periodic monitoring would enhance the knowledge and understanding of this sector and more generally of the way in which the contribution of the agricultural and energy sectors to national sustainable development could be evaluated. The testing in Indonesia also provided a series of lessons learnt about how to apply the indicators as a tool for sustainable development and how to enhance their practicality. [more]
No 59 - Pilot Testing of GBEP Sustainability Indicators for Bioenergy in Colombia 12 December 2014 The Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) has produced a set of twenty-four indicators for the assessment and monitoring of bioenergy sustainability at the national level. The GBEP indicators are intended to inform policymakers about the environmental, social and economic sustainability aspects of the bioenergy sector in their country and guide them towards policies that foster sustainable development. FAO, which is among the founding members of the Global Bioenergy Partnership, tested the indicators in Colombia and Indonesia, with generous support from the International Climate Initiative (ICI) of the Federal Ministry of the Environment, Natural Resource, and Nuclear Safety of Germany. The report presents the results of the testing of the GBEP indicators in Colombia. The testing provided Colombia with an understanding of how to establish the means of a long-term, periodic monitoring of its domestic bioenergy sector based on the GBEP indicators. Such periodic monitoring would enhance the knowledge and understanding of this sector and more generally of the way in which the contribution of the agricultural and energy sectors to national sustainable development could be evaluated. The testing in Colombia also provided a few lessons learnt about how to apply the indicators as a tool for sustainable development and how to enhance their practicality. [more]
No 58 - Walking the Nexus Talk: Assessing the water-energy-food nexus 1 July 2014 Due to global transformational trends, such as population growth, economic development and climate change, energy, water, land and human resources are increasingly under pressure to support societal development and to maintain necessary services. Decision-makers need improved tools in order to be better informed about trade-offs and synergies between different development and management choices, and to help them identify options on how to sustainably manage resources. This report proposes a way to carry out a water-energy-food nexus assessment approach in order to: a) understand the interactions between water, energy and food systems in a given context, and b) evaluate the erformance of a technical or policy intervention in this given context. The ultimate goal of the nexus assessment is to inform nexus-related responses in terms of strategies, policy measures, planning and institutional set-up or interventions. [more]
No 57 - Evidence-based assessment of the sustainability and replicability of integrated foodenergy systems 27 March 2014 Bioenergy when managed sustainably and efficiently can be an alternative energy source that helps reduce energy access problems. Rural and urban communities can benefit from increased access to energy, and therefore improved food security when bioenergy feedstock is produced guided by principles of sustainable production intensification and energy efficiency improvements are made by applying agro-ecological practices and locally adapted technologies.. To mitigate the risks of bioenergy production threatening food security and to harness the potential benefits of bioenergy productionFAO recommends appling good practices of bioenergy production from the onset. The production of bioenergy in Integrated Food-Energy Systems (IFES) is one of such good practices since these systems meet both food and energy demands.This publication presents an analytical framework which serves to screen different IFES options systematically and helps to define which IFES systems are sustainable and replicable. In concrete terms, this framework is envisioned to be a guidance document that allows its user to assess which factors make an IFES truly sustainable and which factors need to be considered when replicating such a system - be it a pilot project, a business innovation or a research experiment. Furthermore, it helps to systematically describe the potential contribution of IFES to sustainable agriculture and the growing bioeconomy, and to raise awareness among decision-makers about which factors can facilitate the replication of such innovative projects.While the concept of IFES builds on the principles of sustainable intensification and the ecosystem approach, it stresses the fact that the diversification of crop and livestock species can lead to a sustainable production of both food and energy feedstock, as long as relevant practices and technologies are locally devised and adapted. It further emphasises that energy efficiency can be reached in these systems when applying sound agr... [more]



dernière mise à jour:  mercredi 4 juillet 2012