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Trends of consumption (utilization)

Was it ever so that NWFP, especially the plant-based products, were used mostly by the tribal communities in Suriname, currently NWFP are being utilised by all sections of the population. The products are being used as medicines, cosmetics, spices, food, in steam and/or hotwater baths, in rituals, etc.

 

3.1 Non Wood Forest Products (NWFP)

In this section a case study " The marketing and economic importance of Biodiversity in Suriname" was done in 1994 by Ms. Yvette E.A. Merton. The case study focused on the use of Non-wood Forest Products on a local level as food, medicinal plants, animals and other plants. Some of the results are summarised in table 1 and 2.

Table 1. Examples of Non-wood forest Products used at a Local level

Surinam Name

Scientific name

Fruits

Kumbu

Oenocarpus bacaba

Kasju

Anacardium occidentale

Spices

Masusa

Renealmia apinia

Nengrekondrepepre

Aframomum melegueta

Medicinal herbs

Kunami

Clibadium surinamense

Neku

Longchocarpus chrysochyllus

Sneki wiwiri

Eryngium foetidum

Isri wiwiri

Ceropteris calomelanos

Colorants, dyestuffs

Koesoewé

Bixa orellana

Oils

Krappa-olie

Carapa procera

Hoepel-olie

Copaifera guyanensis

Walaba-olie

Eperua falcata

Maripa-olie

Miximiliana maripa

Awarra-olie

Astrocaryum segregatum

Medicinal plants

Kwasibita

Quassia amara

Jarakopie

Siparuna guyanensis

Source: 3,4,6,7 Note: non-available data

Table 2. Mammals in the diet of forest-based- communities

Family

Common name

Scientific name

Agoutidae

Paca*

Agouti paca

Bradypodidae

Three toed sloth

Bradypus tridactylus

 

Two toed sloth

Choloepus didactylus

Callithricidae

Golden-handed or midas tamarin

Saguinus midas

Cebidae

Brown capuchin monkey

Cebus apella

 

Common squirrel monkey

Saimiri sciureus sciureus

 

White-fronted capuchin monkey

Cebus albifrons

 

Guianan saki

Pithecia pithecia

 

Brown bearded saki

Chiropotes satanus

 

Red howler monkey*

Alouatta seniculus

 

Black spider monkey

Ateles paniscus paniscus

Cervidae

Brown brocket deer*

Mazama gouazoubira

 

Red brocket deer*

Mazama americana

 

White-tailed deer

Odocoileus virginianus

Dasypodidae

Six-banded armadillo

Euphractus sexcinctus

 

Nine-banded armadillo*

Dasypus novemcinctus

 

Giant armadillo*

Priodontes giganteus

Dasyproctidae

Red rumped agouti

Dasyprocta agouti

 

Red acouchy

Myoprocta acouchy

Hydrochaeridae

Capybara

Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris

Leporidae

Brazilian rabbit or tapiti

Sylvilagus brasiliensis

Tapiridae

Brazilian tapir*

Tapirus terrestris

Tayassuidae

White-lipped pecarry*

Tayassu pecari

 

Collared peccary*

Tayassu tajacu

: Frequent used on a local level. Source: 4.

Note: For medicinal purposes the villagers are using about 300 spp. of the plants.

It is quite difficult to determine which are the most important non-wood forest products/species. Briefly some major uses and relative importance of non-wood forest products are given below in table 3 and 4.

 

Table 3. Non-wood forest products against fever and cold

Against fever

Against cold

Jarakopie (Siparuna guyanensis)

Sneki wiwiri (Eryngium foetidum)

Sneki wiwiri (Eryngium foetidum)

Nengrekondrepepre (Aframomum melegueta)

Kwasibita (Quassia amara)

 

Source: 3,6,7 Note: non-available data

 

Table 4. Oils and their proper use

Product

Use

Krappa-olie (Carapa procera)

Treatment for Hair

Hoepel-olie (Copaifera guyanensis)

Treatment for wounds

Walaba-olie (Eperua falcata)

Treatment for rheumatism

Awara-olie (Astrocaryum segregatum)

Treatment for hair and also as cooking oil

Maripa-olie (Miximiliana maripa)

Cooking oil

Source: 3,6,7 Note: non-available data

The supply of the products mentioned above depends on the climate season and hunting season. Presently, there are no exact numbers or statistical data of these products with the exception of the export/trade of CITES-listed wild animals.

Suriname has ratified the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of the Flora and Fauna (CITES). Trade, export, and import are only possible by obtaining special CITES permits. Suriname has been a party since 15 February 1981.

 

Table 5. Unofficial export/trade data for CITES-listed wildlife (1995 1996)

Note: Total Quota = the total of the quotas for the species traded only; Total Exports =

From recorded export endorsements; Realization = percent of the total quota

used; FOB value = based on the minimum FOB values X total exports.

Year/Type/No. of species Genera

Total

Quota

Total

Exports

FOB value

(US$)

1995

Birds (24)

23,225

11,241

844,178

Mammals (5)

1,275

572

109,635

Reptiles & Amphibians (13)

55,715

17,665

280,705

1996

Birds (25)

25,411

8,134

618,609

Mammals (9)

1,625

794

298,102

Reptiles & Amphibians (13)

55,715

25,894

221,997

Source: 5 Note: For more detailed information see appendix 1 & 2.

 

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