WEB SITE

Acharya, B., Bhattarai, G., de Gier, A. & Stein, A. 2000. Systematic adaptive cluster sampling for the assessment of rare tree species in Nepal. Forest Ecology and Management, 137(1-3): 65-73.

Ahmed, A.K. & Johnson, K.A. 2000. Horticultural development of Australian native edible plants. Australian Journal of Botany, 48(4): 417-426.

Angelsen, A. et al. 2000. Forest products for the middle income households? Economic mobility and the role of benzoin, rubber and rattan among forest communities in Indonesia. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: arild.angelsen@ios.nlh.no )

Asbjornsen, H. et al. 2000. Intermediate forest management systems in tropical moist forests in the Chimalapas region, Oaxaca, Mexico: their evolution, sustainability, and contribution to the health of forest ecosystems and local communities. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: heidi.asbjornsen@isf.nlh.no )

Aubertin, C. 2000. Intermediate systems: a product of sustainable development theory? Examples from the Lao PDR and Brazil. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: aubertin@bondy.ird.fr )

Barden, A., Awang Anak, N., Mulliken, T. & Song, M. 2000. Heart of the matter: agarwood use and trade and CITES implementation for Aquilaria malaccensis. Cambridge, UK, TRAFFIC International. 51 pp.

Barnett, R. 2000. Traditional medicinal practitioners in Kenya: putting theory into practice. TRAFFIC Bulletin, 18(3): 87-90.

Barnett, R., ed. 2000. Food for thought: the utilization of wild meat in eastern and southern Africa. Nairobi, Kenya, TRAFFIC East/Southern Africa. 263 pp.

Barrett, C.B. & Lybbert, T.J. 2000. Is bioprospecting a viable strategy for conserving tropical ecosystems? Ecological Economics, 34(3): 293-300.

Baruah, A.D. 1999. The economics of sandal oil. The Indian Forester, 5(125): 640-643.

Belcher, B. et al. 2000. Competitiveness of rattan gardens: financial costs and benefits of alternative land use options. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: b.belcher@cgiar.org )

Bennett, E.L. & Robinson, J.G. 2000. Hunting of wildlife in tropical forests: implications for biodiversity and forest peoples. Biodiversity Series-Impact Studies No. 76. Washington, DC, World Bank.

Bergemann, S.E. & Largent, D.L. 2000. The site specific variables that correlate with the distribution of the Pacific Golden Chanterelle, Cantharellus formosus. Forest Ecology and Management, (130)1-3: 99-107.

Beukema, R. 2000. Jungle rubber as a dynamic and adaptable system in the lowlands of Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: H.Beukema@biol.rug.nl )

Boer, E. & Ella, A.B., eds. 2000. Plant producing exudates. Plant Resources of South East Asia No. 18. Leiden, the Netherlands, Backhuys Publishers. 189 pp.

Boutinot, L. 2000. Agroforestry systems in the Sudano-Sahelian region in Africa. The central social problematique. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: boutinot@cirad.fr )

Brown, M. & Hutchinson, C. 2000. Participatory mapping at landscape levels: broadening implications for sustainable development and biodiversity conservation in developing country drylands. Arid Lands Newsletter, 48, November/December 2000.

Capistrano, D. 2000. Non-timber forest product based enterprise in forest conservation and community development: India's evolving institutional context. Paper prepared for the XXI IUFRO World Congress, 7-12 August 2000, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Cavendish, W. 2000. Empirical regularities in the poverty-environment relationship of rural households: evidence from Zimbabwe. World Development, 28(11): 1979-2003.

Cleuren, H. 2000. The resilience of agroextravist systems of cambas and Caboclos in the Amazon forest of today. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: cleuren@cml.leidenuniv.nl )

Colding, J. 2000. Last stand: protected areas and the defence of tropical biodiversity. Ecological Economics, 33(2): 331-333.

Collinson, C., Burnett, D. & Agreda, V. 2000. Economic viability of Brazil nut trading in Peru. Natural Resources and Ethical Trade Programme, Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, UK. 62 pp.

Collinson, C. & Leon, M. 2000. Economic viability of ethical cocoa trading in Ecuador. Natural Resources and Ethical Trade Programme, Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, UK. 36 pp.

Danielsen, F. 2000. The biodiversity value of "intermediate systems" of forest management: the impact of enrichment planting with rubber trees on Sumatran lowland forest bird community. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: FDanielsen@compuserve.com )

de Beer, J. 2000. Dynamics in community institutions in the management of NTFPs in Cameroon. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: Jolanda.vandenBerg@Alg.Ar.Wau.Nl )

de Beer, J., Ha Chu Chu & Tran Quoc Tuy. 2000. Non-timber forest products sub-sector analysis, Viet Nam. Hanoi, IUCN-Viet Nam and the NTFP Research Centre.

de Jong, W. 2000. Co-evolution of intermediate NTFP production technologies and shifting cultivation in Indonesia. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: w.de-jong@cgiar.org )

Dhar, U., Rawal, R.S. & Upreti, J. 2000. Setting priorities for conservation of medicinal plants - a case study in the Indian Himalaya. Biological Conservation, 95(1): 57-65.

Dounias, E. 2000. Cocoa production in central African forests: from cash-crop plantations to agroforests. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: edounias@club-internet.fr )

Dunn, R.R. 2000. Isolated trees as foci of diversity in active and fallow fields. Biological Conservation, 95(3): 317-321.

DuWors, E. & Villeneuve, M. 2000. The importance of nature to Canadians: the economic significance of nature-related activities. Ministry of Public Works and Government Services, Canada. 49 pp.

Dutta, R. & Jain, P. 2000. CITES-listed medicinal plants of India: an identification manual. New Delhi, India, TRAFFIC India/WWF India. 85 pp.

Evans, T. & Viengkham, O. (In press). Inventory time-cost and statistical power: a case study of a Lao rattan. Manuscript accepted by Forest Ecology and Management.

Evans, T.D., Sengdala, K., Thammavong, B. & Viengkham, O.V. (In press). A field guide to the rattans of Lao PDR. UK, Kew, Royal Botanic Gardens.

FAO. 2000. Proceedings of the international workshop on community forestry in Africa. Participatory forest management: a strategy for sustainable forest management in Africa. 26-30 April 1999, Banjul, the Gambia. FAO, Rome. (Bilingual edition in English and French). 423 pp. (For more information please contact: Community Forestry Unit, FAO Forestry Department, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, Rome 00110, Italy; fax: +39 0657055514; e-mail: ftpp@fao.org )

Fearnside, P.M. 1999. Biodiversity as an environmental service in Brazil's Amazonian forest: risks, value and conservation. Environmental Conservation, 26(4): 305.

Fialho, C., Lopes, F. & Pereira, H. 2001. The effect of cork removal on the radial growth and phenology of young cork oak trees. Forest Ecology and Management, 141(3): 251-258.

Fisher, R.J. 2000. Poverty alleviation and forests: experiences from Asia. Paper prepared for workshop, Forest ecospace, biodiversity and environmental security, 5 October 2000, Amman, Jordan. Pre-congress workshop IUCN World Conservation Congress 2000.

Foppes, J. & Ketphanh, S. 2000. Forest extraction or cultivation? Local solutions from Lao PDR. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway.

Foundoun, J.M. & Manga, T.T. 2000. Farmers' indigenous practices for conserving Garcinia kola and Gnetum africanum in southern Cameroon. Agroforestry Systems, 48(3):289-302.

Freese, C.H. & Trauger, D.L. 2000. Wildlife markets and biodiversity conservation in North America. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 28(1): 42-51.

Garca, D., Zamora, R., Hodar, J.A., Gomez, J.M. & Castro, J. 2000. Yew (Taxus baccata L.) regeneration is facilitated by fleshy-fruited shrubs in Mediterranean environments. Biological Conservation, 95(1): 31-38.

Garcia, C. 2000. In search of "El Dorado". Benzoin gardens and diversity in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: c.garcia@cgiar.org )

Gillison, A. 2000. Intermediate agroforests and late fallow systems as optimal strategies for sustainable management of biodiversity and profitability in tropical forests. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: andyg@internetnorth.com.au )

Gobbi, J.A. 2000. Is biodiversity-friendly coffee financially viable? An analysis of five different coffee production systems in western El Salvador. Ecological Economics, 33(2): 267-281.

Godoy, R., Wilkie, D. & Brokaw, T.S. 2000. Valuation of consumption and sale of forest goods from a Central American rain forest. Nature, 406(6791): 62.

Goloubinoff, M. 2000. The widow and the businessman: casual and voluntary swiftlet "breeding" in Indonesia. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: m.goloubinoff@cgiar.org )

Gram, S. 2001. Economic valuation of special forest products: an assessment of methodological shortcomings. Ecological Economics, 36(1):109-117.

Green, S.M., Hammett, A.L. & Kant, S. 2000. Non-timber forest products marketing systems and market players in southwest Virginia: crafts, medicinal and herbal, and specialty wood products. J. Sustainable Forestry, 11(3): 19.

Gregory, P.J. & Ingram, J.S.I. 2000. Food and forestry: global change and global challenges. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, 82(1-3): 1-2. (www.elsevier.nl/inca/publications/store/5/0/3/2/9/8/index.htt )

Gregory, P.J. & Ingram, J.S.I. 2000. Global change and food and forest production: future scientific challenges. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, 82(1-3): 3-14. (www.elsevier.nl/inca/publications/store/5/0/3/2/9/8/index.htt )

Hartof, W.H. den & Wiersum, K.F. 2000. Timur (Zanthoxylum armatum) production in Nepal, dynamics in non-timber forest resource management. Mountain Research and Development, 20(2): 136-145.

Homma, A.K.O. 2000. Amazônia: os limites da opção extrativa. Ciencia Hoje, 27(159): 70-73.

Howard, P.C., Davenport, T.R.B., Kigenyi, F.W., Viskanic, P., Baltzer, M.C., Dickinson, C.J., Lwanga, J., Matthews, R.A. & Mupada, E. 2000. Protected area planning in the tropics: Uganda's national system of forest nature reserves. Conservation Biology, 14(3): 858-875.

Humphrey, J.W., Newton, A.C., Peace, A.J. & Holden, E. 2000. The importance of conifer plantations in northern Britain as a habitat for native fungi. Biological Conservation, 96(2): 241-252.

Hutchinson, B., Suarez, E., Fortunato, R., Beeskow, A.M., Bye, R., Montenegro, G. & Timmermann, B. 2000. Conservation and ethnobotanical programs of the Bioactive Agents from Dryland Biodiversity of Latin America Project. Arid Lands Newsletter, No. 48, November/December 2000.

Ite, U. 2000. Evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems: experience from Southeast Nigeria. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: u.ite@lancaster.ac.uk)

Jain, A.K. 2000. Regulation of collection, transit and trade of medicinal plants and other non-timber forest products in India: a compendium. New Delhi, India, TRAFFIC India/WWF India. 529 pp.

Jones, D.T. & Eggleton, P. 2000. Sampling termite assemblages in tropical forests: testing a rapid biodiversity assessment protocol. J. Applied Ecology, 37(1): 191.

Joshi, L. 2000. Gap replanting, an emerging trend in rejuvenation of jungle rubber agroforests in Jambi, Indonesia. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: l.joshi@cgiar.org )

Kala, C.P. 2000. Status and conservation of rare and endangered medicinal plants in the Indian trans-Himalaya. Biological Conservation, 93(3): 371-379.

Kapseu, C. & Kayem, J., eds. 2000. Séminaire international sur le séchage et sur la valorisation du karité et de l'aiélé. Proceedings of an international workshop on drying and improvement of shea and canarium. Ngaoundere, Cameroon 1-3 December 1999. Presse Universitaire de Yaoundé and FAO. 463 pp.

Katz, E. 2000. From fallow to forest: evolution of benzoin gardens management. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: e.Katz@cgiar.org )

Kennedy, J. 2000. Natural history and human prehistory of a rainforest timber resource in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: jkennedy@coombs.anu.edu.au )

Lange, D. 2000. Conservation and sustainable use of Adonis vernalis, a medicinal plant in international trade. Plant Species Conservation Monograph 1. Federal Agency for Nature Conservation, Germany. 90 pp.

Lawrence, A. 2000. Tree cultivation in upland livelihoods in the Philippines: implications for biodiversity, conservation and forest policy. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: AnnaL@aol.com )

Leakey, R.R.B., Wilson, J. & Deans, J.D. 1999. Domestication of trees for agroforestry in drylands. Annals of Arid Zone, 38: 195-220.

Leakey, R.R.B., Fondoun, J.-M., Atanagan, A. & Tchoundjeu, Z. 2000. Quantitative descriptors of variation in the fruits and seeds of Irvingia gabonensis. Agroforestry Systems, 50: 47-58. (For more information, please contact: Dr Roger R.B. Leakey, Head of Tropical Ecology, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology [formerly Institute of Terrestrial Ecology], Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland, UK EH26 0QB; fax: +44 0131 445 3943; www.nbu.ac.uk/tropical )

Le Cup, I. & Nicholson, K. 2000. Community-based tree and forest product-based enterprises: market analysis and development. Field manual. FAO and Regional Community Forestry Training Center for Asia and the Pacific (RECOFTC).

Levang, P. 2000. The vanishing rattan growers of Borneo. Resilience and evolution in a managed NTFP system. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: p.levang@cgiar.org)

Lindenmayer, D.B., Margules, C.R. & Botkin, D.B. 2000. Indicators of biodiversity for ecologically sustainable forest management. Conservation Biology, 14(4): 941-950.

Lopez, C. 2000. Hand-made bark paper in Mexico, local production-regional extraction. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: lopez@itc.nl )

Lovett, P.N. & Haq, N. 2000. Evidence for anthropic selection of the sheanut tree (Vitellaria paradoxa). Agroforestry Systems, 48(3): 273-288.

Lowe, A.J., Gillies, A.C.M., Wilson, J. & Dawson, I.K. 2000. Conservation genetics of bush mango from central/west Africa: implications from random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. Molecular Ecology, 9(7): 831-741.

Lykke, A.M. 2000. Local perceptions of vegetation change and priorities for conservation of woody savanna vegetation in Senegal. J. Environmental Management, 59(2):107-120.

Malo, J. 2000. The Mayan home gardens of the Yucatan, intermediate or alternative systems. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: je.malo@uam.es)

Los productos forestales no madereros en Cuba
Mesa Izquierdo, M., Alvarez Pinto, M. y Sánchez Rodríguez, N. 1999.

Oficina Regional de la FAO para América Latina y el Caribe, Santiago, Chile.


Para más información, dirigirse a:
Oficina Regional de la FAO para América Latina y el Caribe,

Casilla 10095, Santiago, Chile.

Fax: +56 2 3372101/2/2;

correo electrónico: FAO-RLC@fao.org

Michon, G. 2000. Forest domestication by smallholder farmers. Economic rationale versus socio-political strategies. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: Michon@engref.fr )

Minga, M.D. (In press). L'impact de l'exploitation du rotin sur la préservation de la forêt à Kinshasa, République démocratique du Congo. In T.C.H. Sunderland & J.P. Profizi, eds. New research on African rattans. Beijing, China, INBAR.

Misra, M.K. & Dash, S.S. 2000. Biomass and energetics of non-timber forest resources in a cluster of tribal villages on the eastern Ghats, Orissa, India. Biomass and Energy, 18(3): 229-247.

Mogenburg, S. 2000. Economic and ecological drivers and consequences of managing forests for non-timber products. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: moegen3@zoo.ufl.edu )

Mohd Shahwahid Othman & Awang Noor Abdul Ghani. 1999. Economic rent capture from rattan extraction in Malaysia. J. Tropical Forest Products, 5(1): 17-31.

Mollet, M., Herzog, F., Behi, Y.E.N. & Farah, Z. 2000. Sustainable exploitation of Borassus ethiopum, Elaeis guineensis and Raphia hookeri for the extraction of palm wine in Côte d'Ivoire. Development and Sustainability, 2: 43-57.

Mollet, M., Téré, H. & Herzog, F. 2000. Ligneux à usages multiples dans les systèmes agraires tropicaux: une étude de cas de Côte d'Ivoire. Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Forstwesen, 151(10): 335-364.

Moussouris, Y. & Pierce, A. 2000. Biodiversity links to cultural identity in southwest Morocco: the situation, the problems and proposed solutions. Arid Lands Newsletter, No. 48, November/December 2000.

Mulliken, T. 2000. Implementing CITES for Himalayan medicinal plants Nardostachys grandiflora and Picrorhiza kurrooa. TRAFFIC Bulletin. 18(2): 63-72.

Myers, G.P., Newton, A.C. & Melgarejo, O. 2000. The influence of canopy gap size on natural regeneration of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) in Bolivia. Forest Ecology and Management, 127(1-3): 119-128.

Nelson, V., Galvez, M. & Blowfield, M. 2000. Study of the social impact of ethical and conventional Brazil nut trading of forest dependent people in Peru. Natural Resources and Ethical Trade Programme, Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, UK. 51 pp.

Nelson, V., Galvez, M. & Blowfield, M. 2000. Study of the social impact of ethical and conventional cocoa trading on forest-dependent people in Ecuador. Natural Resources and Ethical Trade Programme, Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, UK. 29 pp.

Neumann, R.P. & Hirsch, E. 2000. Commercialisation of non-timber forest products: review and analysis of research.
Rome, CIFOR-Indonesia and FAO. 176 pp.
For copies of the publication, please contact:
CIFOR, PO Box 6596 JKPWB, Jakarta 10065, Indonesia.
Fax: +62 251 622100;
www.cifor.cgiar.org

Neupane, R. 2000. Tree-crop integration in agricultural land, their impact on soil fertility and farm income and influencing factors for adoption under the subsistence farming systems of the middle hills Nepal. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: arp978375ait.ac.th)

Newmark, W.D. & Hough, J.L. 2000. Conserving wildlife in Africa: integrated conservation and development projects and beyond. Bioscience, 50(7): 585-592.

Ngulube, M. 2000. Population structures of Uapaca kirkiana (Euphorbiaceae) in the miombo woodlands of Malawi: status and management prospects for fruit production. J. Tropical Forest Science, 12 (3): 459-471.

Novellino, D. 1999. The ominous switch: from indigenous forest management to conservation - the case of the Batak on Palawan Island, Philippines. In M. Colchester & C. Erni, eds. From principles to practices: indigenous peoples and protected areas in south and southeast Asia. IWGIA Document No. 97, p. 250-295. Copenhagen, Denmark, IWGIA and FPP.

Obua, J., Ogwal, S.F.M. & Mosango, D. 2000. Ecology, utilisation and conservation of Smilax kraussiana in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park, Uganda. J. Tropical Forest Science, 12(3): 542-551.

Oteng-Amoako, A.A. & Obiri-Darko, B. (In press). Rattan as a sustainable cottage industry in Ghana: the need for development interventions. In T.C.H. Sunderland & J.P. Profizi, eds. New research on African rattans. Beijing, China, INBAR.

Pavon, N.P. & Rico-Gray, V. 2000. An endangered and potentially economic tree of Mexico: Tilia mexicana (Tiliaceae). Economic Botany, 54(1): 113-114.

Peres, C.A. 2000. Effects of subsistence hunting on vertebrate community structure in Amazonian forests. Conservation Biology, 14(1): 240-253.

Pilz, D. & Molina, R. (In press). Commercial harvests of edible mushrooms from the forests of the Pacific Northwest United States: issues, management, and monitoring for sustainability. Manuscript accepted by Forest Ecology and Management.

Potis, H. 2000. Forest management sitemaps practice: the case of Batak Tribe in Palawan, Phillippines. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: ecostorm@Ign.pworld.net.ph )

Putz, F.E. 2000. Economics of home grown forestry. Ecological Economics, 32(1): 9-14.

Putz, F.E. et al. 2000. Biodiversity conservation in the context of tropical forest management. Environment Department Papers No. 75, Biodiversity Series-Impact Studies No. 1. Washington, DC, USA, World Bank. (www.worldbank.org/biodiversity )

Rai, L.K., Prasad, P. & Sharma, E. 2000. Conservation threats to some important medicinal plants of the Sikkim Himalaya. Biological Conservation, 93(1): 27-33.

Raintree, J. 2000. Multi-participant market analysis and development: some methods used in buffer zones of nature reserves in Vietnam. Paper presented at the International Symposium on Mountain Mainland Southeast Asia: governance in the natural and cultural landscape, 1-15 July 2000, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Renuka, C. 2000. A field key for the rattans of Kerala. Peechi, India, Kerala Forest Research Institute (KFRI).

Ricker, M., Siebe, C., Sánchez, S.B., Shimada, K., Larson, B.C., Martínez-Ramos, M. & Montagnini, F. 2000. Optimising seedling management: Pouteria sapota, Diospyros digyna, and Cedrela odorata in a Mexican rainforest. Forest Ecology and Management, 139(1-3): 63-77.

Rijsort van, J. 2000. NTFPs: their role in sustainable forest management in the tropics. Theme Study Series No. 1. Forest Forestry and Biological Diversity Support Group, National Reference Centre for Nature Management, Wageningen, the Netherlands. 61 pp.

Robbins, C. 1999. Medicine from U.S. Wildlands: an assessment of native plant species harvested in the United States for medicinal use and trade and evaluation of the conservation and management implications. Washington, DC, USA, The Nature Conservancy. 28 pp.

Rodríguez, J.P. 2000. Impact of the Venezuelan economic crisis on wild populations of animals and plants. Biological Conservation, 96(2):151-159.

Ruiz Pérez, M., Ndoye O., Eyebe, A. & Puntodewo, A. 2000. Spatial characterisation of non-timber forest products markets in the humid forest zone of Cameroon. International Forestry Review, 2(2): 71.

Saastaimonen, O., Kangas, K. & Aho, A. 2000. The picking of wild berries in Finland in 1997 and 1998. Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, 15: 645-650.

Salafsky, N., Cordes, B., Parks, J. & Hochman, C. 1999. Evaluating linkages between business, the environment and local communities: final results from the Biodiversity Conservation Network. Biodiversity Support Programme, Washington, DC, USA.

Sastry, C. 2000. Bamboo in the new millennium: opportunities and challenges. Paper presented at the XXI IUFRO World Congress, 7-12 August 2000, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Scarpa, R., Buongiorno, J., Jiin-Shyang Hseu & Abt, K.L. 2000. Assessing the non-timber value of forests: a revealed-preference hedonic model. J. Forest Economics, 6(2): 83-108.

Sedrez dos Reis, M., Celso Fantini, A., Nodari, R.O., Guerra, M.P. & Reis, A. 2000. Sustainable yield management of Euterpe edulis Martius (Palmae): a tropical palm tree from the Atlantic tropical forest, Brazil. J. Sustainable Forestry, 11(3): 1.

Siebert, S.F. 2000. Abundance and growth of Desmoncus orthacanthos Mart. (Palmae) in response to light and ramet harvesting in five forest sites in Belize. Forest Ecology and Management, 137(1-3): 83-90.

Siebert, S.F. 2000. Primary forests and medicinal plants. Conservation Biology, 14(3): 596.

Smektala, G. 2000. Un modèle pour mieux comprendre les décision des paysans en agroforestrie. (A model for better understanding the decisions of farmers in agroforestry). Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: smektala@engref.fr)

Smith, M.A.L., Marley, K.A. & Meline, B. 2000. Bioactive properties of wild blueberry fruits. J. Food Science, 65(2): 352.

Soehartono, T. & Newton, A.C. 2000. Conservation and sustainable use of tropical trees in the genus Aquilaria. I. Status and distribution in Indonesia. Biological Conservation, 96(1): 83-94.

Soehartono, T. & Newton, A.C. 2000. Conservation and sustainable use of tropical trees in the genus Aquilaria. II. The impact of gaharu harvesting in Indonesia. Biological Conservation, 97(1): 29-41.

Sunderland, T.C.H. 2000. The taxonomy, ecology and utilization of African rattans (Palmae: Calamoideae). University College, London and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK. (Ph.D. thesis)

Sunderland, T.C.H. & Dransfield, J. (In press). Certification guidelines for rattans. In P. Shanley, S. Laird, A. Pierce & A. Guillen, eds. The management and marketing of non-timber forest products: certification as a tool to promote sustainability. People and Plant Series No. 5. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/WWF/UNESCO.

Sunderland, T.C.H., Defo, L., Ndam, N., Abwe, M. & Tamnjong. (In press). A socio-economic profile of the rattan trade in Cameroon. In T.C.H. Sunderland & J.P. Profizi, eds. New research on African rattans. Beijing, China, INBAR.

Svarstad, H. & Dhillion, S.S., eds. 2000. Responding to bioprospecting: from biodiversity in the South to medicines in the North. Oslo, Norway, Spartacus Forlag.

Tabuna, H. 2000. Évaluation des échanges des produits forestiers non-ligneux entre l'Afrique subsaharienne et l'Europe. Accra, Ghana, Bureau régional FAO pour l'Afrique. 91 pages.

Taylor, P. & Zabin, C. 2000. Neoliberal reform and sustainable forest management in Quintana Roo, Mexico: rethinking the institutional framework of the Forestry Pilot Plan. Agriculture and Human Values, 17: 141-156.

Temu, A.B. et al., eds. 2000. Off-forest tree resources of Africa. Proceedings of a workshop. Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania, 12-16 July 1999. Nairobi, Kenya, African Academy of Sciences. 336 pp.

Tewari, D.D. 2000. Valuation of non-timber forest products (NTFP) models, problems and issues. J. Sustainable Forestry, 11(4): 47-68.

Tilman, D. 2000. Causes, consequences and ethics of biodiversity. Nature, 405(6783): 208-211.

Torras, M. 2000. The total economic value of Amazonian deforestation, 1978-1993. Ecological Economics, 33(2): 283-297.

Uniyal, R.C., Uniyal, M.R. & Jain, P. 2000. Cultivation of medicinal plants in India: a reference book. New Delhi, India, TRAFFIC India/WWF India. 161 pp.

Vail, D. & Hultkrantz, L. 2000. Property rights and sustainable nature tourism: adaptation and mal-adaptation in Dalarna (Sweden) and Maine (USA). Ecological Economics, 35(2): 223-242.

van Bodegom, A.J. 2000. Natural forest management by local groups in the humid tropics. Theme Studies Series No. 2. Forest Forestry and Biological Diversity Support Group, National Reference Centre for Nature Management, Wageningen, the Netherlands. 65 pp.

Van On, T., Quyen, D., Bich, L.D., Jones, B., Wunder, J. & Russell-Smith, J. 2000. A survey of medicinal plants in BaVi National Park, Vietnam: methodology and implications for conservation and sustainable use. Biological Conservation, 97(3): 295-304.

Vasit, K. & Feoli, E., eds. 2000. Bioprospecting and strategies of industrial exploitation of medicinal and aromatic plants. Vienna, Austria, United Nations Industrial Development Organization and International Centre for Science and High Technology. 43 pp.

Venkatesh Nayak, S.N., Ramachandra Swamy, H., Nagaraj, B.C., Usha Rao & Chandrasekhara, U.M. 2000. Farmers' attitude towards sustainable management of Soppina Betta forests in Sringeri area of the Western Ghats, South India. Forest Ecology and Management, 132(2-3): 223-241.

Verdeaux, F. 2000. EMBU (Kenya) and CHAGGA (Tanzania): exemplification of agroforest establishment. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: f.verdeaux@cgiar.org)

Vimala, S. & Mohd. Ilham Adenan. 1999. Malaysian tropical forest medicinal plants: a source of natural antioxidants. J. Tropical Forest Products, 5(1): 32-38.

Wiersum, F. 2000. "Intermediate" forest management systems: characteristics and dynamics. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: freerk.wiersum@bhhk.bosb.wau.nl)

Wijesekara, R. 2000. Ecological and economic sustainability in different land-use systems in Sri Lanka. Paper presented at the workshop, Cultivating (in) tropical forests. The evolution and sustainability of intermediate systems between extractivism and plantations. CIFOR-FORESASIA, 28 June-1 July 2000, Lofoten, Norway. (E-mail: renuka.wijesekara@isf.nlh.no )

Wikstrom, P. & Eriksson, L.O. 2000. Solving the stand management problem under biodiversity-related considerations. Forest Ecology and Management, 126(3): 361-376.

Wunder, S . 2000. Ecotourism and economic incentives - an empirical approach. Ecological Economics, 32(3): 465-479.

New publications planned in the FAO NWFP series

Wild edible fungi for food security: options for sustainable use and development

Wild edible fungi (WEF) are an important component in diets, as well as being a source of income, for many people in developing countries worldwide. Information on wild edible mushroom trade and production is already included in two publications in the NWFP series (NWFP from conifers, 1998 and NWFP from temperate broadleaved trees [in preparation]).

The new publication, which is part of a series of efforts to document the role of NWFPs in food security, aims to gather in one volume the scattered information on the uses and prospects for development of WEF worldwide. It will include aspects such as management and production of WEF in forest ecosystems, the role of WEF in rural livelihoods, and markets. It will draw on experiences from many countries and regions in the world.

By disseminating this information, it is expected that the attention of forestry technicians, nutritionists, natural resource planners and policy-makers will be drawn to the links between this important category of NWFPs and food security.

The study is scheduled to be completed by the end of September 2001.

For more information, please contact:
laura.russo@fao.org

Resource assessment of non-wood forest products: experience and biometric principles

This publication is intended as a source of advice for practitioners considering inventory of non-wood forest product (NWFP) resources. Through review and analysis of experience it provides information:

· on the range of approaches used and developed to date and their biometric adequacy;
·
to help the practitioner decide when biometric methods are necessary;
·
to guide the design and selection of appropriate biometric methods for resource quantification in different situations and for different products.

[This publication is based on the results of a workshop held in Rome in May 2000. See under Recent Events.]

For more information, please contact:
aura.russo@fao.org

NWFP from temperate broadleaved trees

The objective of this paper is to provide a global review of the non-wood products and services provided by trees found in temperate broadleaf forests. The world's temperate broadleaf forests provide a vast array of products that are beneficial to humans. Temperate broadleaved trees are an important source of non-wood forest products (NWFP), some of which have been used by humans since prehistoric times.

Included in this publication is the range of NWFPs that this group of trees provides, species that are important sources of NWFP and places where these products are harvested. The products described are organized according to the part of the tree from which they are obtained - entire trees, foliage and flowers, bark, resins, fruits, nuts and organisms closely associated with temperate broadleaved trees. Where possible, data on levels of production and international trade are presented. Problems associated with the sustainable management of these products and compatibility or conflicts with other land uses are also presented. Both contemporary and historical or traditional uses of NWFPs from temperate broadleaved trees are discussed. Emphasis is placed on those species from which NWFPs are harvested from either natural or planted forests as opposed to trees planted in orchards (e.g. pome or stone fruits, olives and certain nuts) and are considered to be important agricultural crops.

This information is presented to assist in identifying opportunities for management and production of NWFPs as an integral part of economic development and poverty alleviation initiatives in economically depressed regions of the world where trees are an important element in the ecology, economics and human social structure. In addition, this information is also designed to help identify situations where special management of forests and woodlands may be appropriate to maintain or enhance the productivity of traditional or contemporary NWFP or to develop a potentially beneficial new resource.

For more information, please contact:
Paul.Vantomme@fao.org

Agroforestry parklands

in sub-Saharan Africa

J.-M. Boffa. 1999. Rome,

F AO. 230 pp.

Agroforestry parklands, traditional agroforestry systems in the Sudano-Sahelian region, are among the most widespread agroforestry systems in African countries south of the Sahara. This FAO Conservation Guide reviews the status of knowledge of these systems and synthesizes the experiences relating to the biophysical, socio-economic and policy aspects of their management. It identifies crucial research needs and promising avenues for further promoting their management, conservation and development. It is expected that future cooperative action will contribute to the sustainability of these agroforestry parklands and to their enhanced role in the livelihoods of rural populations in sub-Saharan Africa.



The French version is also available.
For copies, please contact:

FAO Distribution and Sales (Distribution-Group@fao.org )

For more information, please contact:

Ms Michelle Gauthier, Forestry Officer, FAO Forestry Department, Rome, Italy.

Fax: +39 0657055618;

e-mail: michelle.gautheir@fao.org


Other recent publications

Indigenous knowledge development in Bangladesh

This impressive volume, edited by Professor Paul Sillitoe, is an important contribution to the fields of both anthropology and development. It is particularly useful for all those who are directly or indirectly concerned with the problems associated with development in Bangladesh, including social scientists, planners, policy-makers, extension workers and government and non-government workers.

Divided into five sections relating to development issues, agroforestry, plant resources, fish resources and methodological issues, the book contains 24 valuable articles, including an introduction and conclusion, and brings together a range of disciplines from anthropology and sociology to natural resource sciences and development studies. The majority of the papers were originally presented in the first workshop on The State of Indigenous Knowledge in Bangladesh held in Dhaka, Bangladesh in May 1998, by the Bangladesh Resource Centre for Indigenous Knowledge (BARCIK) in association with the IK Research Project of Durham University, United Kingdom.

The book is published by the University Press Limited, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

For more information, please contact:
Mr Mohiuddin Ahmed, The University Press Limited, Red Crescent Building, 114 Motijheel C/A, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh.
Fax: +880 956 5443;
e-mail: upl@bttb.net;
www.uplbooks.com

Enterprise development for natural products

The Asia Network for Small-scale Agricultural Bioresources (ANSAB) has recently published a manual entitled Enterprise development for natural products, which promotes a strategy for natural product enterprise design that contributes to conserve biodiversity and promote social equity. What does the manual provide? A framework of enterprise development planning in natural products in general and the non-timber forest products (NTFP) subsector in particular, as well as practical tools for addressing the issues of marketing, resource assessment, business fundamentals and policy environment.

For more information, please contact:
Business Service Center,
Asia Network for Small-scale Agricultural Bioresources (ANSAB),
PO Box 11035, Kathmandu, Nepal.
Fax: +977 1 487916;
e-mail: ansab@mos.com.np
[Please see under Country Compass for more information on ANSAB.]

Natural chemical substances in Australian plants (Aus, 2000). 300 pp. Pb.

This is a reprint of a rare compilation of chemicals produced in Australian plants, drawn from a comprehensive search of literature to 1954.
Listed by species, good indexes of chemical names and plant genera.
For more information or to order a copy, please contact:
Granny Smith's Bookshop, PO Box 27, Subiaco, WA 6008, Australia.
www.AOI.com.au/granny

 

Use and potential of wild plants in farm households

FAO Farm Systems Management Series, No. 15, by Professor Vernon Heywood, Centre for Plant Sciences and Systematics, School of Plant Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, UK.

This publication demonstrates the important contribution of wild plants to the life of rural households, particularly in developing countries. The enhanced use of these resources would increase income and food security, assist development through small-scale investment, improve the efficiency and profitability of farm household labour use and help eliminate or alleviate poverty. The role of wild plants, especially in rural farm households, is, however, very often ignored or underestimated by planners, policy-makers, aid and development agencies, banks, extension services, economists, agronomists, genetic resource organizations and others.

Wild plants are rarely exploited as a main occupation or source of income but from a component of the many activities that make up the economy of farm households. In the planning of farming systems development projects for rural households, the role of wild plants needs to be assessed as far as possible.

The Farm Management and Production Economics Service of FAO's Agriculture Department commissioned this publication in order to raise awareness of the role of wild plants in many farming systems, providing examples from a range of different systems around the world. The publication describes the major areas in which plants contribute to farm households' incomes and the welfare of the local people and assesses the potential for future development. The book also points out the social, economic, legal and institutional constraints to enhance the use of wild plants and proposes ways in which these constraints may be overcome. (Source: Extracted from the Preface.)

Ms Michelle Gauthier, Forestry Officer, FAO Forestry Department, Rome, Italy.

Fax: +39 0657055618;
e-mail: michelle.gautheir@fao.org

Secondary forest trees of Kalimantan, Indonesia. A manual of 300 species. 2000. Edited by P.J.A. Keßler. Tropenbos-Kalimantan Series No. 3. MOFEC-Tropenbos-Kalimantan Project, Wanariset Samboja, Indonesia.

The manual is one of the results of a cooperative project of the Indonesian Ministry of Forestry and Estate Crops (MOFEC) and the Tropenbos Foundation in Wageningen, known as the multidisciplinary International MOFEC Tropenbos-Kalimantan Project. The project is located at Samboja in East Kalimantan and has been incorporated into the Wanariset field station of the Samarinda Forest Research Institute. The project aims to provide methods and techniques for ensuring the conservation, rehabilitation and sustainable use of mixed dipterocarp forests. It focuses on the sustainable use of forests for timber and non-timber forest products, conservation management, and rehabilitation of degraded areas.

For more information, please contact:
The Tropenbos Foundation, PB 232, Wageningen 6700 AE, the Netherlands.
Fax: +31 317 423024;
e-mail: tropenbos@tropenbos.agro.nl;
www.tropenbos.nl

The miracle tree - Moringa oleifera: natural nutrition for the tropics

Moringa oleifera is a tree with a multitude of attributes. A recent book prepared by the Church World Service (CWS) discusses only a few of its uses and potentials: those relating to its capacity to ensure good health among people in the tropics and subtropics through the high nutritional content of its edible leaves and pods, and through the use of its seeds to purify drinking water. Charts, recipes and pamphlets are included so that the book can serve as a training manual for health workers.

A result of extensive research, this book also relates the practical results of a pilot project, a collaborative effort between CWS and the Senegalese development organization AGADA (Agir autrement pour le développement en Afrique), to test the theory that the products of the moringa tree can prevent or cure malnutrition among children and women of child-bearing age.


For more information, please contact:
Mr Lowell J. Fuglie, Regional Representative, West Africa Regional Office, Church World Service, 12 rue Félix Faure, BP 3822, Dakar, Senegal

Take time to read, it is the foundation of wisdom.

Old English prayer



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