Two Essays on Socio-economic
Aspects of Soil Degradation

by
Leslie Lipper and
Dan Osgood

FAO
ECONOMIC
AND SOCIAL
DEVELOPMENT
PAPER

149


Table of Contents

Foreword

Abstract

Résumé

Resumen

DIRT POOR: POVERTY, FARMERS AND SOIL RESOURCE INVESTMENT

1. Introduction

2. Natural resources in agricultural production

3. The investment profile of poor agricultural producers

4. Policy implications

5. Research needs

References



METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES IN ANALYSING THE LINKAGES BETWEEN SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS

1. Introduction

2. Soil degradation and socio-economic conditions: concepts

3. Data

4. Data integration

5. Statistical analysis and presentation

6. Conclusions and directions for future research

References

List of useful Web sites and data sources



LIST OF FIGURES

1. Soil degradation: Africa (GLASOD)

2. False elevation representation of average windspeed

3. Illiteracy rates: Africa

4. Percent change in terms of trade: Africa

5. Ghana: poverty rate

6. Ghana: rainfall

7. Ghana: road density

8. Wind and soil degradation

9. Wind and soil degradation: closeup

10. Terms of trade and soil degradation

11. Soil degradation in per capita income

12. Illiteracy and decreases in per capita income

13. Soil degradation and decreases in per capita income: closeup

14. Illiteracy and decreases in per capita income: closeup

15. Ghana: soil degradation (GLASOD)

16. Ghana: soil degradation and poverty


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ISBN 92-5-104629-8

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FAO 2001


This volume contains two papers that analyse the relationship between socio-economic conditions and soil degradation. In the first paper, the focus is on providing a better understanding of the incentives and constraints faced by poor farmers in making soil management decisions and the implications these have for designing sustainable development policies. In the second paper, methodological issues that arise in the analysis of the causes and consequences of soil degradation are discussed and empirical geographic information system-based examples of analyses at country and subnational levels are presented.