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Livestock keeping in urban areas

Livestock keeping
in urban areas

A review of traditional technologies
based on literature and field experience

FAO
ANIMAL
PRODUCTION
AND HEALTH
PAPERS

151

The designations employed and the presentation of material in this information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

ISBN 92-5-104575-5

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© FAO 2001


CONTENTS

Foreword

Acknowledgements

Chapter 1
Introduction

Chapter 2
Stakeholders, systems and issues in urban livestock keeping

MAJOR STAKEHOLDERS IN URBAN LIVESTOCK KEEPING

MAJOR SYSTEMS IN URBAN LIVESTOCK KEEPING

MAJOR ISSUES IN URBAN LIVESTOCK KEEPING

VARIATION IN URBAN LIVESTOCK SYSTEMS,

CONCLUDING COMMENTS

Chapter 3
Technology and management for livestock development

INTRODUCTION

A CLASSIFICATION OF TECHNOLOGIES

ON-THE-SHELF TECHNOLOGIES AND

MANAGEMENT OPTIONS

Chapter 4
Livestock species for urban conditions

CHICKENS

RABBITS

GUINEA PIGS

PIGEONS

Chapter 5
Husbandry techniques

FEEDING

REPRODUCTION

ANIMAL HEALTH, FOOD SAFETY AND ANIMAL WELFARE

Chapter 6
Product processing and waste management

INTRODUCTION

PRODUCT PROCESSING

WASTE PROCESSING2

Chapter 7
Conclusions

References and suggested reading


TABLES

TABLE 1

Numbers of cattle, per type of breed, in peri-urban Damascus, 1993 to 1996

TABLE 2

Annual per capita consumption of livestock products in Beijing

TABLE 3

Non-agricultural and agriculture-related occupations of poultry producers in the United Republic of Tanzania

TABLE 4

Descriptions and characteristics of urban livestock systems, a random choice from the literature

TABLE 5

General characteristics of two milk production systems in Dar-es-Salaam

TABLE 6

Effects of supplementing medium-quality roughage rations with coconut cake

TABLE 7

Estimated daily inflows of milk to Dar-es-Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania

TABLE 8

Positive characteristics of small-scale urban livestock systems at different levels of system hierarchy

TABLE 9

Perceived problems in urban livestock systems and possible coping strategies at different levels of system hierarchy

TABLE 10

Profitability of different systems for keeping chickens

TABLE 11

Average costs of nutrients in two different farming systems (US$ per 100 kg of dry matter [DM] and total digestible nutrients [TDN])

TABLE 12

A matrix characterizing technologies and management practices for low and high external input urban livestock systems

TABLE 13

Categories of pig producers in Port-au-Prince, Haiti

TABLE 14

Dietary components of backyard poultry, pigs and dairy cattle in Mexico City (% of producers using each)

TABLE 15

Effects of supplementing medium-quality roughage rations with coconut cake: growing bulls (150 kg live weight) in Sri Lanka

TABLE 16

Effects of HEIA and LEIA modes of farming on aspects of production, processing and waste handling

TABLE 17

Preparation of biltong

TABLE 18

Methods, technologies and examples of meat preservation

TABLE 19

Production of yoghurt and curd

TABLE 20

Methods, technologies and examples of local (household-level) milk processing

TABLE 21

Waste management at different levels

TABLE 22

Organizations and networks on urban agriculture

 


FIGURES

FIGURE 1

Two different patterns in growth of cities: like a blanket

FIGURE 2

The main areas (green) involved in the supply and receipt of buffaloes from the Landhi dairy colony

FIGURE 3

Von Thünen's model showing the relationship between distance to the city (i.e. the market) and the pattern of farming followed.

FIGURE 4

Examples of locally processed milk food using simply sealed polyethylene sachets

FIGURE 5

By-products from meat production