Request for help - Astrocaryum huicungo
Request for help - Effect of RIL on NTFPs
Request for help - Nipa palm
Request for help - Survey on the commercial potential of selected tropical NWFPs from the state of Acre, Brazil
Request for help - training materials
Request for help - truffle research
Request for help - wild mushroom business
Request for information - NTFP definition (1)
Request for information - NTFP definition (2)
Request for information - Russian Far East


Request for help - Astrocaryum huicungo

El motivo de la presente es para solicitar información sobre la extracción de aceite de una planta denominada Huicungo (Astrocaryum huicungo). Deseo recibir información sobre cómo extraer el aceite de esta planta mediante métodos tradicionales pero efectivos.

Mi dirección postal es: Víctor Hugo Acosta Avila, Romulo Espinar 117 (esquina Colegio Rosa Agustina), Iquitos, Loreto, Perú; correo electrónico: vicacost@yahoo.com

Request for help - Effect of RIL on NTFPs

I am researching RIL (reduced impact logging) and Non-Timber forest Products (NTFP) for advancing sustainable forest management and would like information about implementing RIL techniques for NTFPs. In addition to information on this subject, I am looking into the economic feasibility to implement RIL tactics and utilize NTFPs for sustainable forest management ... and not coming up with a lot of case studies or real-life examples. Any ideas would be appreciated.

If you can help, please contact: Erica Clark, Virginia Tech University (erclark1@vt.edu ).

Request for help - Nipa palm

I am looking for information on the Nipa palm and how to develop its products into a cottage industry that will generate employment in the countryside of the Philippines.

If you can help, please contact: Nick Villarruz (iam@capznet.mozcom.com )

Request for help - Survey on the commercial potential of selected tropical NWFPs from the state of Acre, Brazil

We are currently assisting the government of Acre, Brazil, in assessing the market potential of seven tropical NWFPs (copaiba, andiroba, patua, buriti, murmuru, cat's claw and açai), as part of a project (www.projetoacre.ac.gov.br) that seeks to improve the livelihood of forest dwellers (subsistence farmers/rubber tappers/Indians), while conserving the natural (forest) resources base.

Any information regarding the uses, demand and international markets for these products would be appreciated since pertinent available information seems to be scarce, out of date, too aggregate and/or not quantified.

If you can help, please contact: Hector Escobar (Unicamp, Campinas-SP) hector@eco.unicamp.br, or Guy Henry (CIRAD, Campinas-SP) guyhenry@lexxa.com.br

Request for help - training materials

I am looking for business training materials designed for NWFP enterprises. This is part of some research I am doing for a non-profit conservation group called Innovative Resources Management. More specifically, I am seeking information that could help train new NWFP businesses in product feasibility analysis and marketing. Information on standard formats for product feasibility analysis and rural based marketing would also be useful.

If you can help, please contact:

Abhishek Lal,
Innovative Resources Management, 2421
Pennsylvania Ave, NW,
Washington, DC 20037,
USA;
fax: +1 202 2938386;
e-mail: abhishek_lal@hotmail.com ; www.irmgt.com

Request for help - truffle research

I am currently doing research on a truffle found in most of the eastern United States, as well as Quebec and Mexico. The species is Tuber lyonii, which has also been called T. rufum and T. texense. It may be found in most places where any of the following trees are found: shagbark hickory, American basswood, scarlet oak, several other oak species, pecan, and possibly other tree species as well. The largest collections to date have been associated with either American basswood or pecan.

Because of the wide range involved, there is also a considerable variation in fruiting times. The fungus has been reported from as early as June in Mexico and southern Texas to as late as March in Minnesota "a week after the snows went off".

Truffles are economically important worldwide, and have an enviable position among gourmets. Last year, the Italian white truffle (Tuber magnatum) sold for US$7 000/lb in a charity auction, according to a report published by the BBC.

The wide range and fruiting times indicate T. lyonii may also be a fungus of some economic importance, but it appears to have been largely ignored for nearly 100 years (it was first collected in 1903).

To proceed with its development, I need to know how common it is at this time and how much is available.
For more information, please visit:
 
www.oregonwhitetruffles.com ;
if you can help, please contact: Daniel B. Wheeler (dwheeler@teleport.com ).

Request for help - wild mushroom business

I am starting to work on my postgraduate study project. This marketing project will focus on the charcoal and wild mushroom business in Hungary that links to the European market. I would also like to analyse the target market in which the Hungarian products (charcoal and wild mushroom) are participating. I am actually looking for country-specific (Europe) information about the charcoal and wild mushroom business. If you have any kind of material, publications, ideas about these topics, please contact me personally: Attila Hegedus, Hungary (hegedus@emk.nyme.hu).

Request for information - NTFP definition (1)

I am making a literature review on the NTFP issue. There seems to be confusion regarding the name and definition. Why isn't there a universal name with a common definition? As well as for classifications?

Please clarify this for me. Silavanh Sawathvong (silavanh@hotmail.com ).

The following reply has already been sent from FAO's NWFP Programme, but perhaps readers have additional ideas that they would like to share.

"Indeed, the situation is rather complex. NWFPs - as we call them - are a rather diverse group of products, ranging from medicinal plants and roots to lianas and bushmeat. The terms just used already show the different possibilities on how to classify these products: by use (medicine), life form (lianas) and part used (roots). Obviously, every classification and definition depends on the purpose of why they are used.

It will be very difficult to identify ONE definition or ONE terminology that will fit everybody's needs. However, what is important is that whenever a given term/classification is used, at least both, terms and classifications, are defined. Once defined, the information presented can be compared with other literature (which might use other terms and definitions ...).

For further information on this issue, please have a look at the following articles available on our Web site:

• Terminology, Definition and Classification of Forest Products other than Wood (C. Chandrasekharan), at: www.fao.org/docrep/V7540e/V7540e28.htm ;

• Towards a harmonized definition of non-wood forest products, at: www.fao.org/docrep/x2450e/x2450e0d.htm#fao "

Request for information - NTFP definition (2)

I know you might have extensively deliberated on definitions. The use of Non-Wood instead of Non-Timber is somehow misleading. How do you classify products like chewsticks that are woody, but non-timber? (Hassan Adewusi; ajilete@hotmail.com )

The following reply has already been sent from FAO's NWFP Programme

Please have a look at a brief article on this issue at: www.fao.org/docrep/x2450e/x2450e0d.htm#fao , where we distinguished between wood and non-wood forest products. Chewsticks can be derived from different part of the plants, e.g. bark and roots, and I would tend to include them. However, there is indeed a grey area and no clear borderline between NWFP/WP, NTFP/NWFP and NTFP/Timber.

Request for information - Russian Far East

I would like to find out if you have any information/database suggestions for obtaining information on NTFPs in the Russian Far East. I am working with a forestry project there and am doing some background research.

If you can help, please contact: Maureen DeCoursey, Director of Sustainable Development, Herb Research Foundation, 1007 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Boulder, Colorado 80302, USA (Fax: +1 303 4497849; e-mail: mdecoursey@herbs.org or modecoursey@hotmail.com ; www.herbs.org ).

 




You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep.

(Navajo Proverb )

 



Resourceful rattans

Rattans are palms which grow in the tropical forests of Africa and Asia. The word rattan is derived from the Malay "rotan", the local name for climbing palms. Rattans are best known for the manufacture of chairs and tables, giving many verandas and terraces their much appreciated casual or holiday appeal. Locally, however, rattans are also used as vegetables from the edible shoots, or for ropes, fibres, roof thatching, construction materials and all kinds of household furniture. A recent publication in the FAO NWFP series, Rattan, current research issues and prospects for conservation and sustainable development, contains the proceedings of a joint FAO/INBAR International Expert Consultation on Rattan.


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