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APPENDICES


Appendix I: List of participants

REGIONAL EXPERT CONSULTATION OF THE ASIA-PACIFIC NETWORK FOR FOOD AND NUTRITION ON THE STATUS OF FIVIMS INITIATIVES

19 - 22 November 2002, Bangkok, Thailand,

BANGLADESH

Anwar Hossain
Deputy Chief, Programming Division,
Planning Commission, Block No. 2, Room No. 21
Ministry of Planning
Sher-E-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka
Facsimile: (880-2) 8113377
Email: pcprgosu@dotbd.com




Mirza Altaf Hossain
Executive Director
Bangladesh Applied Nutrition & Human Resource
Development Board
Sech Bhaban, 22, Manik Mia Avenue
Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka 1207
Facsimile: (880-2) 8110798
Email: birtan@citechoco.net



CAMBODIA

H.E. It Nody
Under Secretary of State
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
C/o International Cooperation Office
Department of Planning, Statistics and
International Cooperation
#200 Preah Norodom Blvd, Phnom Penh
Facsimile: (855) 23- 215686
Email: sunhean@bigpond.com.kh




Choch Nhean
Senior Officer for International Cooperation and
IT Development
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
200 Norodom Blvd.
Cha mkar Morn, Phnom Penh
Facsimile: (855) 23 211 051
Email: choch@mobitel.com.kh



CHINA

Yuna He
National Institute for Nutrition and Food Safety
Chinese Centre for Disease Control
29 Nan Wei Road
Xuan Wu District
Beijing 100050
Facsimile: (86-10) 63043740
Email: yunahe@infh.ac.cn



FIJI

Hiangi Foraete
Principal Agricultural Officer (Quarantine)
Ministry of Agriculture, Sugar and Land Resettlement
Private Mail Bag, Raiwaga
Facsimile: (679) 3305043
Email: ladischulz@yahoo.com.au



INDIA

Shyam S. Dubey
Deputy Secretary, Department of Food and Public Distribution
Ministry of Food Consumer Affairs & Public Distribution
185, Krishi Bhawan
New Delhi
Facsimile: 3382529
Email: dsic@fca.delhi.nic.in



INDONESIA

Iwan Fortuna Malonda
Head of Food Security Information System
Agency for Community Empowerment Food Security
Ministry of Agriculture
2nd Floor, E-Building, Jalan Harsono Room #3
Jakarta
Facsimile: (62 21) 7806708
Email: iwan@deptan.go.id



NEPAL

Yogesh Vaidya
Deputy Director General
Department of Plant Resources
Research and Planning Division
GPO Box No. 2270
Thapathali, Katmandu
Facsimile: (977) 1 251142
Email: yogesh_vaidya@excite.com



PHILIPPINES

Elsa M. Bayani
Executive Director
National Nutrition Council
P.O. Box 2490, Makati Central Post Office
Makati City, Metro Manila
Facsimile: (632) 8164280
Email: nncelsa@i-next.net




Maria Antonia G. Tuazon
Dean/College of Human Ecology and Director, Regional
Training Programme on Food and Nutrition Planning
University of the Philippines at Los Banos
College, Laguna 4031
Facsimile: (63-49) 536-2445
Email: Peachay57@yahoo.com



SAMOA

Lafaele Enoka
Senior Agricultural Economist
Maluafou
P.O. BOX 481
Apia
Email: al_enoka@yahoo.co.nz



SRI LANKA

M.O.A. de Zoysa
Director
Hector Kobbekaduwa Agrarian Research and
Training Institute (HARTI)
114 Wijerama Mawatha
Colombo 07
Email: hartidir@sltnet.lk



THAILAND

Songsak Srianujata
Director, Institute of Nutrition
Mahidol University at Salaya
Putthamonthon
Nakorn Prathom 73170
Facsimile: (+66-2) 441 9344
Email: directnu@mahidol.ac.th




Anchalee Ooraikul (could not attend)
Deputy Secretary General
Office of Agricultural Economics
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
Facsimile: (+66-2) 940-7208
Email: anchaleo@mozart.inet.co.th




Uriporn Jitjang
Institute of Nutrition
Mahidol University at Salaya
Putthamonthon
Nakorn Prathom 73170
Facsimile: (+66-2) 441 9344
Email: directnu@mahidol.ac.th




Arunee Krittayanawat
Office of Agricultural Economics
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
Facsimile: (+66-2) 9406485, 9406489
Email: arunee_k@hotmail.com



VIET NAM

Nguyen Cong Khan
Director, The National Institute of Nutrition
48 Tang Bat Ho
Hanoi
Facsimile: (84-4) 9717885
Email: nindn@hn.vnn.vn



OBSERVERS

Michihiro Tamura
Deputy Director (for FAO Section)
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
International Cooperation Division
General Food Policy Bureau
1-2-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-8950
Facsimile: (81-3) 3502-8083
Email: michihiro_tamura@nm.maff.go.jp




Michiya Otsuka
Senior Statistician
Office of International Affairs Statistics and Information
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry Department and Fisheries
1-2-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-8950
Facsimile: (81-3) 3580-3767
Email: michiya_ootsuka@nm.maff.go.jp



RESOURCE PERSON

D. B. Antiporta
Senior Policy Adviser
Policy Assistance Branch (RAPP)
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
Maliwan Mansion, 39 Phra Atit Road
Bangkok 10200
Email: Donato.Antiporta@fao.org




Sohail J. Malik
Chairman, Innovative Development Strategies (Pvt) Ltd.
House 5, Street 38, F8/1
Islamabad
Facsimile: (92-51) 2256356
Email: sjmalik@aol.com



FAO HEADQUARTERS

Jenny Riches
FIVIMS Secretariat
ESDG, FAO Rome
Facsimile: (39-06) 570-56172
Email: Jenny.Riches@fao.org




Rene Verduijn
FIVIMS Secretariat
ESDG, FAO Rome
Facsimile: (39-06) 570-56172
Email: Rene.Verduijn@fao.org




Minamiguchi Naoki
Asia FIVIMS Project
ESCG, FAO Rome
Facsimile: (39-06) 57-054495
Email: Naoki.Minamiguchi@fao.org



SECRETARIAT

T.C. Ti
Senior Food Systems Economist
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
Maliwan Mansion, 39 Phra Atit Road
Bangkok 10200
Email: Tc.Ti@fao.org




Biplab K. Nandi
Senior Food and Nutrition Officer
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
Maliwan Mansion, 39 Phra Atit Road
Bangkok 10200
Facsimile: (+66-2) 6974445 or 6974405
Email: Biplab.Nandi@fao.org




S.M. Ziauddin Hyder
FIVIMS Consultant
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
Maliwan Mansion, 39 Phra Atit Road
Bangkok 10200
Facsimile: (+66-2) 6974445
Email: Zia.Hyder@fao.org; hyder95@hotmail.com




Ms. Wilai Thearapati
Secretary
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
Maliwan Mansion, 39 Phra Atit Road
Bangkok 10200
Facsimile: (+66-2) 6974445 or 6974405
Email: Wilai.Thearapati@fao.org



Appendix II: Opening address by He Changchui FAO Regional Representative for Asia and the Pacific (Delivered by N. M. Hla)

Madam Chairperson, Distinguished Participants, Representative from the Government of Japan, My colleagues from Headquarters and the Regional Office, Ladies and Gentlemen.

I am pleased to welcome you all on behalf of the Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Dr. Jacques Diouf, and on my own behalf to the Regional Expert Consultation of the Asia-Pacific Network for Food and Nutrition on The status of FIVIMS initiative.

According to the World Food Summit, food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. Achieving food security means ensuring that sufficient food is available, that supplies are relatively stable and that those in need of food can obtain it. Food-insecure people are those individuals whose food intake falls below their minimum calorie (energy) requirements as well as those who exhibit physical symptoms caused by energy and nutrient deficiencies resulting from an inadequate or unbalanced diet or from the body's inability to use food effectively because of infection or disease. An alternative view would define the concept of food insecurity as referring only to the consequence of inadequate consumption of nutritious food, considering the physiological utilization of food by the body as being within the domain of nutrition and health.

The World Food Summit resolved to reduce the number of undernourished people in the world by at least 50 percent by the year 2015. In addition, it set the longer-term goals of, eventually, eradicating hunger and achieving food security for all. The World Food Summit: five years later (WFS:5yl) held in June 2002 reaffirmed the role of FAO and the importance of the Inter-Agency Working Group on FIVIMS in strengthening national and international monitoring of food security. The State of Food Insecurity (SOFI) 2002 estimates that there are 799 million undernourished people in the developing countries. If the objectives of the WFS are to be achieved, appropriate policies and action programmes that are directed specifically at the people who are undernourished or at risk need to be developed and implemented. An important first step is the identification of food-insecure and vulnerable groups, and the causes of their food insecurity and vulnerability. Such information should make it possible to monitor and assess the situation and to design and, eventually, evaluate possible policies and interventions. This again underscores the importance of an initiative like FIVIMS.

If they are to be effective, policies aimed at promoting food security require accurate and timely information on the incidence, nature and causes of food insecurity and vulnerability. Unfortunately, there is a particular lack of good information at the subnational and household levels.

Many countries have established information units or systems for specific purposes such as providing early warning systems, promoting market efficiency, monitoring health and nutrition status or preparing food security situation assessments.

As we all are aware, the FIVIMS process takes into account some important and crucial socio-economic, nutritional and geographical information and related information systems, such as agricultural information systems; health information systems; land, water and climatic information systems; early warning systems; household food security and nutrition information systems; market information systems; and vulnerability assessment and mapping systems. RAP, in collaboration with FAO Headquarters, has been assisting member countries to establish national FIVIMS with a view to addressing the issues of food insecurity. I am pleased to mention that the Japan-funded Trust Fund project entitled Development of a vulnerability information base, mapping and dissemenation system for Asia in support of FIVIMS: GCP/RAS/170/JPN, known as the Asia FIVIMS project, is being implemented to provide technical support to the overall FIVIMS initiative, as well as to provide an assessment of food insecurity and vulnerability in Asia. At the end of 2001, RAP and the Asia FIVIMS project formed a partnership in order to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of technical assistance to five countries in the region to start with. The countries included are Bangladesh, Cambodia, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand. The activities are aimed at building government capacities in establishing and operationalizing FIVIMS. It is encouraging to note that Phase II of the Asia FIVIMS Trust Fund Project plans to operate from RAP in close collaboration with FAO Headquarters.

I wish to thank the Government of Japan for its support to the FIVIMS initiative in the RAP region. The present consultation is indeed an effort to strengthen that initiative.

Madam Chair,

Food insecurity is a multisectoral and multidimensional phenomenon and is attributable to a range of factors that vary in importance across regions, countries and social groups, as well as over time. These factors include the socio-economic, environment, food economy and caring practices, besides health and sanitation. In order to achieve success, strategies to eliminate food insecurity have to tackle these underlying causes by combining the efforts of those who work in diverse sectors such as agriculture, nutrition, health, education, social welfare, economics and the environment. At the national level, this means that different ministries or departments need to combine their complementary skills and efforts in order to design and implement integrated cross-sectoral initiatives which must interact and be coordinated at the policy level.

I am told country-wise initiatives are underway in order to establish and strengthen national level FIVIMS initiatives. I also understand that the national participants present here are directly involved with the FIVIMS initiative in their respective countries. The present consultation will deliver upon various issues of national FIVIMS so as to have the expected outcomes at the country level which may include improved policy formulation, improved progamme management, more effective design and focusing of interventions and more comprehensive intersectoral and institutional dialogue.

I trust that the deliberations will be productive and I wish you a successful meeting. I also wish you a pleasant stay in this wonderful city. I thank you for your kind attention.

Appendix III: Agenda and timetable

Agenda

1. Overview of FIVIMS - FAO perspective;

2. Review of country status related to implementation of FIVIMS and identification of future actions;

3. Review of national-level progress in implementing the follow-up activities on ICN and WFS;

4. Discussion on FIVIMS in relation to the PRSP and UNDAF/CCA; and

5. Any other item with permission of the Chair.

Expected outcomes of the Consultation

1. Status of FIVIMS implementation updated.

2. Constraints with regard to FIVIMS implementation identified.

3. Approaches toward project development and/or implementation on establishment of FIVIMS identified.

4. Firm commitment to work towards establishing FIVIMS at the national level expressed.

5. Current position in implementation of NPAN and WFS Plan of Action updated.

6. Strategies of linking national FIVIMS to UNDAF/CCA and PRSP discussed.

Timetable

DAY 1 - 19 November 2002


Part I: Opening of the Consultation

0830

Registration

0900

Opening session


Welcome: Biplab K. Nandi, Secretary, ANFN, FAO-RAP


Introduction of the participants and election of the officers of the meeting

0915

Opening address by He Changchui, FAO Regional Representative for Asia and the Pacific

0930

Refreshment

1000

Objectives, agenda, adoption of agenda and organisation of the consultation by Biplab K. Nandi, FAO-RAP



Part 2: Overview of FIVIMS

1030

Global perspective of the FIVIMS in monitoring food insecurity and vulnerability by Jenny Riches, FIVIMS IAWG Secretariat

1100

Update on FIVIMS activities under the RAP-Asia FIVIMS partnership by Naoki Minamiguchi, Asia FIVIMS, FAO

Part 3: Presentations and discussions to review progress of implementation of FIVIMS and ICN and WFS follow-up activities

1130

Bangladesh

1205

Lunch (Hosted by the Regional Representative)

1330

Cambodia

1405

China

1440

Fiji

1515

Refreshment

1545

India

1620

Meeting of the rapporteurs


DAY 2 - 20 November 2002


Part 3: Presentations and discussions - continued

0830

Indonesia

0905

Nepal

0940

Philippines

1015

Refreshment

1045

Samoa

1120

Internet-based Asia FIVIMS data dissemination and sharing system in support to development of KIDS by Naoki Minamiguchi, Asia FIVIMS, FAO

1150

Discussion

1200

Lunch



Part 4: FIVIMS in relation to the PRSP and UNDAF/CCA process

1330

Introduction by René Verduijn, FIVIMS IAWG Secretariat

1350

UNDAF/CCA: overview and a regional perspective by D.B. Antiporta, FAO-RAP

1420

Discussion

1430

PRSP: overview and a regional perspective by Antonia G Tuazon, RTP-FNP, UPLB, the Philippines

1500

Discussion

1510

Refreshment

1540

Opportunities and scopes of FIVIMS to monitor the progress towards the PRSP by Sohail Jehangir Malik, Innovative Development Strategies (Pvt) Ltd., Pakistan

1610

Discussion



Part 5: Working groups - Opportunities to raise the profile of FIVIMS Focal Points

1620

Introduction and formation of two working groups Working group 1: National FIVIMS as a contribution to the PRSP process - a SWOT analysis Facilitators: Antonia G Tuazon and Sohail Jehangir Malik Working group 2: National FIVIMS as a contribution to the UNDAF/CCA process - a SWOT analysis Facilitators: D.B. Antiporta and René Verduijn

1700

Meeting of the rapporteurs


Day 3 - 21 November 2002


Part 6: Working groups - continued

0830

Group work 1 and 2

1000

Refreshment

1015

Group work 1 and 2

1100

Plenary presentation by group 1

1120

Plenary presentation by group 2

1140

Plenary Discussion

1200

Lunch



Part 7: Presentations and discussions to review progress of implementation of FIVIMS and ICN and WFS follow-up activities

1330

Sri Lanka

1405

Thailand

1440

Refreshment

1500

Viet Nam

1535

Discussion

1600

Meeting of the rapporteurs


DAY 4 - 22 November 2002



Part 8: Closure of the Consultation

0800

Preparation of the draft report of the consultation

1000

Refreshment

1030

Presentation and adoption of the report

1130

Closing

1200

Lunch

Appendix IV: Guidelines for working groups

SWOT analysis of FIVIMS in relation to the UNDAF/CCA and PRSP process

Background and Rationale

After the introductory presentations and discussions on the UNDAF/CCA and PRSP process in Part 5 of the meeting, in Part 6 the participants will be asked to sit together, discuss and analyse the opportunities of linking the FIVIMS initiative more closely with the CCA/UNDAF and PRSP process in individual countries. The SWOT analysis (analysing Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) has been selected as a tool to guide the interaction in the working groups.

National FIVIMS, a definition:

Any system or network of systems that assembles, manages, analyses and disseminates information about people that are food insecure and/or malnourished, or are at risk of becoming food insecure and malnourished.

SWOT Analysis - Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats. A SWOT Analysis is an effective method of identifying your own Strengths and Weaknesses, and to examine the Opportunities and Threats you face in your working environment (FIVIMS). Carrying out this analysis will often be illuminating - both in terms of pointing out what needs to be done, and in putting problems into the right perspective. Ideally, the SWOT analysis provides you with the components to update your business strategy, to use your own strengths and opportunities perceived around you to overcome some of your less strong points, and to anticipate well in advance some of the trends that could negatively impact on your work. Details of the SWOT Analysis, its general meaning and examples of specific questions that we would look at in our working group session on Wednesday and Thursday, are provided in the matrix below:

SWOT ANALYSIS Focussing on FIVIMS

Internal Environment - Under Control

External Environment - Out of Control

Strengths
- What are your strengths?
- What are you good at?
- What do you have to offer?
Specific:
- What indicators does FIVIMS generate that would help the preparation of reports such as a CCA or PRSP?
- How could this benefit the UNDAF/CCA and/or PRSP process?
- What are the advantages of having indicators on hunger, malnutrition and information on specific vulnerable groups?
- Can they help in monitoring poverty as well?

Opportunities
- What are the opportunities for FIVIMS?
- What are the interesting trends?
Specific:
- What are the current opportunities and trends in UN, donor and government policies that could set up an operational food insecurity and malnutrition monitoring system? What are the opportunities for institutionalization of this process, with national ownership and sustainability?
- What are opportunities for raising necessary funds to develop and maintain a national food security and nutrition monitoring system?
- Who could be users interested in food security and nutrition data?

Weaknesses
- What are the things that could be improved?
- What is done badly?
- What should be avoided?
Specific:
- Is FIVIMS already operational? Does a network of information experts already exist, with exchange of data and inter-sectoral analysis?
- What are the institutional weaknesses of your national FIVIMS structure?
- How important is food security information monitoring on the national scale of priorities?

Threats
- What obstacles do you face?
- What is your competition doing?
- Are the required specifications for your products or services changing?
- Do you have funding problems?
- What are the trends that are likely to have a negative impact on our own work?
Specific:
- What are the impediments in your view to "institutionalizing" FIVIMS?
- Do you foresee problems with raising funds for FIVIMS type work?

Goal

The main goal of these working groups is to raise awareness among participants on the CCA/UNDAF and PRSP process and the importance that both could play as an important target audience for food insecurity and vulnerability information generated by a national FIVIMS.

Output

At the end of part six, through the two working group presentations we expect to know more about the working environment of FIVIMS for operational and institutional issues in a number of countries, in particular its role with/ links to the UNDAF/CCA and PRSP process through the successful monitoring of food insecurity and vulnerability information, as well as the analysis of cross-sectoral information to identify and characterize specific vulnerable groups of people.

Process

The participants will self-select their working groups based on their national context and experiences with the PRSP and/or UNDAF/CCA process. In case all participants have a preference to discuss the relationship between FIVIMS and the PRSP, we can easily facilitate that by having two groups on that topic. The participants will then disperse to their pre-assigned break-away rooms. The following steps provide some guidance to the facilitators in the flow of activities:

Step 1: Group introductions

Step 2: Explanation of SWOT analysis by facilitator(s).

Step 3: Explanation of specific goals of the exercise/ expectations from the participants.

Step 4: Identification of a rapporteur, who is likely to give the presentation the next morning.

Step 5: Start brainstorming exercise by asking to list three important strengths on separate coloured cards.

Step 6: Ask participants to rank observations 1-3 based on perceived importance.

Step 7: Facilitator starts clarification of the cards/ drawing out process and discussion. Only use cards listed 1 (highest priority) for group discussion due to time limitations.

Step 8: Group summarizes (Rapporteur notes down on the flip chart) the listed "strengths," with possibly country examples, and outcome of discussions. We should aim to complete the "strengths" analysis by the end of the day, so that the other three (W-O-T) can be discussed the next morning.

Step 9: Complete brainstorming exercise for Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats as well.

Step 10: If time is available, please have a look at the result and discuss if you can. Combine/use some of your strengths to take onboard some of the opportunities that have arisen. In a similar fashion you could discuss use of your strengths and opportunities to address some of your weaknesses. Example: Based on expertise in food security information (Strength), and given the need for food security information by the PRSP/ CCA/UNDAF process (Opportunity), some institutions like the WB might consider funding a number of support activities. This way, "lack of funding" has been overturned as a Internal Weakness/ External Threat by finding a customer willing to pay for your services.

Step 11: Present findings of the working group in plenary!


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