Gender and Law - Women's Rights in Agriculture


ISSN 1014-6679

FAO
LEGISLATIVE
STUDY

76



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Table of Contents


Lorenzo Cotula

for the

FAO Legal Office

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2002

The designations employed and the presentation of material in this information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

ISBN 92-5-104849-5

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© FAO 2002


Table of Contents


FOREWORD

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

I. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Object, scope and methodology
1.2. The principle of gender equality
1.3. The sources of women’s legal status

1.3.1. International law
1.3.2. Domestic law
1.3.3. Customary law
1.3.4. Norms of a religious origin
1.3.5. The interaction between the different levels of law

II. WOMEN’S RIGHTS TO LAND AND OTHER NATURAL RESOURCES

2.1. Introduction
2.2. Relevant international law
2.3. The Americas

2.3.1. Regional overview
2.3.2. Mexico
2.3.3. Brazil

2.4. Sub-Saharan Africa

2.4.1. Regional overview
2.4.2. Kenya
2.4.3. Burkina Faso
2.4.4. South Africa

2.5. Northern Africa and the Middle East

2.5.1. Regional overview
2.5.2. Tunisia

2.6. Asia

2.6.1. Regional overview
2.6.2. India
2.6.3. The Philippines

2.7. The Pacific region

2.7.1. Regional overview
2.7.2. Fiji

2.8. Europe

2.8.1. Regional overview
2.8.2. Italy

2.9. Conclusion

III. THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS

3.1. Introduction
3.2. Relevant international law
3.3. The Americas

3.3.1. Regional overview
3.3.2. Mexico
3.3.3. Brazil

3.4. Sub-Saharan Africa

3.4.1. Regional overview
3.4.2. Kenya
3.4.3. Burkina Faso
3.4.4. South Africa

3.5. Northern Africa and the Middle East

3.5.1. Regional overview
3.5.2. Tunisia

3.6. Asia

3.6.1. Regional overview
3.6.2. India
3.6.3. The Philippines

3.7. The Pacific region

3.7.1. Regional overview
3.7.2. Fiji

3.8. Europe

3.8.1. Regional overview
3.8.2. Italy

3.9. Conclusion

IV. THE RIGHTS OF SELF EMPLOYED RURAL WOMEN

4.1. Introduction
4.2. Relevant international law
4.3. The Americas

4.3.1. Regional overview
4.3.2. Mexico
4.3.3. Brazil

4.4. Sub-Saharan Africa

4.4.1. Regional overview
4.4.2. Kenya
4.4.3. Burkina Faso
4.4.4. South Africa

4.5. Northern Africa and the Middle East

4.5.1. Regional overview
4.5.2. Tunisia

4.6. Asia

4.6.1. Regional overview
4.6.2. India
4.6.3. The Philippines

4.7. The Pacific region

4.7.1. Regional overview
4.7.2. Fiji

4.8. Europe

4.8.1. Regional overview
4.8.2. Italy

4.9. Conclusion

V. TOWARD THE REALIZATION OF WOMEN’S RIGHTS: LEGAL REFORM AND IMPLEMENTATION

5.1. Summary of the main findings
5.2. Factors affecting the implementation of women’s rights

5.2.1. Courts
5.2.2. Human rights commissions and other independent authorities
5.2.3. Customary dispute settlement authorities
5.2.4. Legal information and legal aid
5.2.5. The lack of resources for gender related laws, programmes and institutions
5.2.6. The lack of “voice” of rural women

5.3. Legal reform and implementation

REFERENCES

WOMEN’S RIGHTS LEGISLATION ON THE INTERNET

FAO LEGISLATIVE STUDIES

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