Port State Control of Foreign Fishing Vessels




FAO Fisheries Circular No. 987
FIP/C987 (En)
ISSN 0429-9329





Table of Contents



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by
Terje Lobach
International Legal Consultant

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2003

The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

All rights reserved. Reproduction and dissemination of material in this information product for educational or other non-commercial purposes are authorized without any prior written permission from the copyright holders provided the source is fully acknowledged. Reproduction of material in this information product for resale or other commercial purposes is prohibited without written permission of the copyright holders. Applications for such permission should be addressed to the Chief, Publishing Management Service, Information Division, FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00100 Rome, Italy or by e-mail to copyright@fao.org

© FAO 2003


Table of Contents


PREPARATION OF THIS DOCUMENT

ABBREVIATIONS

1. INTRODUCTION

2. JUSTIFICATION FOR A HARMONIZED SYSTEM

3. HOW TO ACHIEVE A COMPREHENSIVE AND TRANSPARENT SYSTEM

4. ELEMENTS OF A POSSIBLE MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

4.1 "Flag of Convenience" in the context of port State control
4.2 Listing of vessels
4.3 Prior notice of port access
4.4 Denial of access to port
4.5 Port State obligations
4.6 Port inspections
4.7 Possible actions
4.8 Information and reporting

5. IMPLEMENTATION OF PORT STATE CONTROL OF FOREIGN FISHING VESSELS INTO DOMESTIC LEGISLATION

6. CONCLUSIONS