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APPENDIX 1 - Estimated Minimum Absorbed Doses for Certain Responses for Selected Pest Groups


This appendix is for reference purposes only and is not a prescriptive part of the standard. The list is not exhaustive and should be adapted to specific circumstances. The references here are widely available, easily accessible and generally recognized as authoritative. The list is not comprehensive or static; nor is it endorsed as a standard under this ISPM.

ESTIMATED MINIMUM ABSORBED DOSES FOR CERTAIN RESPONSES FOR SELECTED PEST GROUPS[4]

The following table identifies ranges of minimum absorbed dose for pest groups based on treatment research reported in the scientific literature. Minimum doses are taken from many publications that are in the references listed below. Confirmatory testing should be done before adopting the minimum dose for a specific pest treatment.

To ensure the minimum absorbed dose is achieved for phytosanitary purposes, it is recommended to seek information about the Dmin for a particular target species and also to take into consideration the note in Appendix 2.

Pest group

Required response

Minimum dose range (Gy)

Aphids and whiteflies (Homoptera)

Sterilize actively reproducing adult

50-100

Seed weevils (Bruchidae)

Sterilize actively reproducing adult

70-300

Scarab beetles (Scarabidae)

Sterilize actively reproducing adult

50-150

Fruit flies (Tephritidae)

Prevent adult emergence from 3rd instar

50-250

Weevils (Curculionidae)

Sterilize actively reproducing adult

80-165

Borers (Lepidoptera)

Prevent adult development from late larva

100-280

Thrips (Thysanoptera)

Sterilize actively reproducing adult

150-250

Borers (Lepidoptera)

Sterilize late pupa

200-350

Spider mites (Acaridae)

Sterilize actively reproducing adult

200-350

Stored product beetles (Coleoptera)

Sterilize actively reproducing adult

50-400

Stored product moths (Lepidoptera)

Sterilize actively reproducing adult

100-1,000

Nematodes (Nematoda)

Sterilize actively reproducing adult

~4,000

References

International Atomic Energy Agency. 2002. International Database on Insect Disinfestation and Sterilization. (available at http://www-ididas.iaea.org).

Hallman, G. J. 2001. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment. In: Molins, R.A. (ed.) Food Irradiation Principles and Applications. New York: J. Wiley & Sons. p. 113-130.

Hallman, G. J. 2000. Expanding radiation quarantine treatments beyond fruit flies. Agricultural and Forest Entomology. 2:85-95. http://www.iaea.org/icgfi is also a useful website for technical information on food irradiation.


[4] Not conclusively demonstrated with large scale testing. Based on literature review by Hallman, 2001.

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