LSP Working Paper - August 2002 LSP Working Paper 2
Access to Natural Resources Sub-Programme

Improving Access to Natural Resources for the Rural Poor - The Experience of FAO and of Other Key Organizations from a Sustainable Livelihoods Perspective

Lorenzo Cotula

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS

Livelihood Support Programme (LSP)
An inter-departmental programme for improving support for enhancing livelihoods of the rural poor.

August 2002

Table of Contents


The Livelihood Support Programme

The Livelihood Support Programme (LSP) evolved from the belief that FAO could have a greater impact on reducing poverty and food insecurity, if its wealth of talent and experience were integrated into a more flexible and demand-responsive team approach.

The LSP works through teams of FAO staff members, who are attracted to specific themes being worked on in a sustainable livelihoods context. These cross-departmental and cross-disciplinary teams act to integrate sustainable livelihoods principles in FAO's work, at headquarters and in the field. These approaches build on experiences within FAO and other development agencies.

The programme is functioning as a testing ground for both team approaches and sustainable livelihoods principles.

Email: lsp@fao.org

Access to natural resources sub-programme

Access by the poor to natural resources, including land, forests, water, fisheries and wildlife, is essential for sustainable poverty reduction. Landless people in rural areas are particularly vulnerable, because without secure access to land and other natural resources, they can have more difficulty obtaining food, accumulating other assets and recovering after environmental and economic shocks or misfortunes.

The main goal of this sub-programme is to build stakeholder capacity to improve poor people's access to natural resources. It also aims to make sustainable livelihoods approaches more effective in reducing poverty among the poorest of the poor, particularly landless and near landless people.

To date, the sub-programme has analysed the relationship between access to natural resources and sustainable livelihoods, in particular evaluating the contribution of sustainable livelihoods approaches to an understanding of the relevant poverty, vulnerability and livelihood issues.


Table of Contents


LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

INTRODUCTION

Object of the report
Definitions
Methodology
Acknowledgements
Organization of the report

1. ANR ACTIVITIES WITHIN FAO

1.1 Introduction
1.2 The Strategic Framework and the Medium Term Plan
1.3 Brief overview of ANR activities

Sustainable Development
Forestry
Fisheries
Technical Cooperation
Economic and Social
Agriculture
Legal Office
Informal Working Group on Participatory Approaches and Methods to Support Sustainable Livelihoods and Food Security (IWG-PA)

1.4 Case study: Hills Leasehold forestry and Forage Development Project in Nepal
1.5 Case study: The Sustainable Fisheries Livelihoods Programme in West Africa
1.6 Case Study: FAO Pastoral Risk Management Strategy/World Bank Sustainable Livelihoods Programme, Mongolia

2. OTHER ORGANIZATIONS EXPLICITLY OR IMPLICITLY USING SLA IN RELATION TO ANR

2.1 Introduction
2.2 CANARI (Caribbean Natural Resources Institute)
2.3 CARE
2.4 Development Alternatives Group
2.5 DfID (Department for International Development)
2.6 GADEC (Groupe d'Action pour le Développement Communautaire)
2.7 IDL (In Development Ltd.)
2.8 IDS (Institute of Development Studies)
2.9 IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development)
2.10 IIED (International Institute for Environment and Development)
2.11 IISD (International Institute for Sustainable Development)
2.12 Khanya - Managing Rural Change CC
2.13 NRI (Natural Resources Institute)
2.14 ODI (Overseas Development Institute)
2.15 Oxfam
2.16 UNDP (United Nations Development Programme)
2.17 WFP (World Food Programme)
2.18 World Bank
2.19 Other relevant organizations

BIDS (Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies)
BSF (Belgian Survival Fund)
CEPAL (UN Economic Commission for Latin American and the Caribbean)
CICAFOC (Coordinadora Indígena Campesina de Agroforestería Comunitaria)
CLADES (Consorcio Latinoamericano sobre Ecología y Desarrollo)
ENDA (Environnement et Développement du Tiers Monde)
GRET (Groupe de Recherche et d'Exchanges Technologiques)
Institute of Development Management (Mzumbe University, Tanzania)
IRAM (Institut de Recherches et d'Applications des Méthodes de Développement)
IUCN (World Conservation Union)
MAELA (Movimiento Agroecológico de América Latina)
NLC (National Land Committee, South Africa)
ODG (Overseas Development Group, University of East Anglia)
Samata (Samata Samaj Kalyan Samity)
Via Campesina
Local partners in SLA/ANR programmes: governments and NGOs

3. SUMMARY OF MAIN FINDINGS

3.1 Integrating SLA in FAO's ANR activities
3.2 SLA and ANR entry points
3.3 SLA and ANR project design, implementation and M&E
3.4 ANR and the assetless
3.5 ANR in specific contexts
3.6 Development of SLA in relation to ANR: Socio-economic differentiation
3.7 Development of SLA in relation to ANR: Rights-based approach
3.8 Partnerships within FAO
3.9 Partnerships with external stakeholders

Partnerships with organizations already using SLA/ANR
Partnerships with organizations using approaches having commonalities with SLA

APPENDIX 1: INTERVIEWS AND E-MAIL EXCHANGES

APPENDIX 2: REFERENCES

APPENDIX 3: INTERNET RESOURCES ON SLA

Further information about the LSP