COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT CASE STUDY
26

Understanding the Indigenous Knowledge and Information Systems of Pastoralists in Eritrea

Prepared by

Alessandro Dinucci and Zeremariam Fre

in collaboration with

Communication for Development Group
Extension, Education and Communication Service
Research and Training Division
Sustainable Development Department

   
 
Table of Contents
 
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2003

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© FAO 2003

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Foreword

1. Studying pastoral indigenous knowledge and information systems

1.1 Justifications and objectives of the study
1.2 Outline of methodology
1.3 Overview of pastoralism in the Horn of Africa

2. Pastoral indigenous knowledge and information systems in Eritrea

2.1 Location, area and population
2.2 Modern history
2.3 National policies towards pastoralism
2.4 Socio-economic profile of pastoralists
2.5 Gender roles among pastoralists
2.6 The indigenous knowledge of mobile herders

2.6.1 Animal production
2.6.2 Animal husbandry
2.6.3 Ethno-veterinary knowledge

2.7 Communication processes and information systems among pastoralists

3. Reconsidering pastoral indigenous knowledge and information systems

Maps

Figures

Bibliography