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CONCLUDING SESSION

Roundtable Recommendations

The recommendations of the specific Roundtables are summarized below:

Roundtable 1: Developing national organic standards and complying with those of importing countries

This working group was facilitated by Mr Bo van Elzakker, AgroEco/IOAS Consultancy. He opened the discussions with an introduction. Suggestions and recommendations offered included:

Why National Standards?

Consumer confidence: locally (resident consumers and tourists) and in the export market

Protection of producers

Regulates the sector and encourages production

Defines common denominators:

farm practices and consumer interests or preferences

processes/systems description or product standards

different systems (and therefore defines the baseline acceptance for imports)

product/name (terminology) and therefore provides protection for its use

Legitimizes organic agriculture (and facilitates production, especially with respect to the importation of inputs and the support from government)

Provides equivalence, but with appropriate independence as standards developed are specific to the particular environment

Provides a forum for communication and consensus. (There is also an education component in seeking to achieve a common understanding)

Process of Developing National Standards

This is a continuing process of development→ revision→ monitoring. The steps are:

Identification and meeting of relevant stakeholders including - small and large producers, businesses, NGOs, research organizations, government and representatives of consumer groups

Development of an institutional framework; including the identification of a coordination institution with the required resources of time and money to facilitate the process

Development of an approved format

Identification of realistic priority areas

Participatory formulation of draft (including testing, compliance and IFOAM1 involvement)

Private vs. Public Standards

Government regulates public standards

Private standards are regulated by the sector itself

It is possible to have private standards alongside existing public standards, similar to the UK Soil Association. In this way the local organic organization maintains some control through the IFOAM accredited tool with which the integrity of the word 'organic' is preserved.

Avenues for Assistance with Standards Development

FAO - through cooperation with governments on local projects

ITC - for private sector marketing

CTA - training, etc.

CDE - technical assistance for the setting up of companies

USAID - in promoting organic products

Other organizations that can also help:

GTZ (German Agency for Technical Cooperation)

BioLatina

Related Issues

The development of national standards is one point in a long development process. It must be a part of a national programme or strategy.

Legislation also needs implementation and monitoring mechanisms

The stakeholders must be identified and involved in the development of national standards; the commercial and not-for-profit sector should be involved first before there is government involvement.

National standards should be revised every two years. Stakeholders must also be involved in the revision process.

There is no need to start from zero:

It is possible to start creatively and then compare with what exists, but this is problematic.

It is also possible to translate existing standards and accept them without amendment, but this is not 'ownership'.

Final comments

National standards must:

SUPPORT ORGANIC AGRICULTURE

BE USER FRIENDLY

BE SEEN AS AN OPPORTUNITY, NOT AS A BARRIER

Roundtable 2: Organic production: a fundamental change in farming methods?

Members of this roundtable participated in a brainstorming session to identify key issues to be addressed. The group then split into three thematic groups to discuss: (i) technology development; (ii) smallholders concerns; and (iii) institutional matters and the ecosystem approach. The results of each group discussions converged on recommendations for: information, research, training and policy support for the development of organic agriculture.

Group 1. Technology development

The status of organic agriculture should be established at the national level in order to determine the feasibility of the sector and to provide a baseline for future action as well as for monitoring progress. These surveys should cover: type of organic products; quantity of produce by commodity; information on both domestic and international markets; financing opportunities; and available inspection and certification. Such surveys could be launched and coordinated by IICA, CTA or FAO.

Results of national surveys of the organic industry should be aggregated at subregional and regional levels by an international institution. These surveys should be used by the concerned regional/subregional institutions to identify precise research and development agendas. CARDI and/or UWI could be responsible of the Caribbean-related research agenda. Within subregions, required activities should be executed by existing subregional experts and institutions, such as CARDI, UWI, CABI, IICA, etc. New organic research agenda, and their inevitable implication on the expanded mandates of the involved institutions, should receive explicit recognition by ministries of agriculture because political support is of key importance.

Efforts should be made to upgrade/reform extension services offered by the ministries of agriculture to include holistic training approaches and organic agriculture techniques. Non-governmental and farmers' organizations have a lot to offer in this process. FAO, CTA or CABI could assist in promoting private-public collaboration on organic agriculture training. Training should be provided to farmers, extension workers and technicians, as well as facilitation of farmer-to-farmer exchanges within and between countries. For example, Cuba, Dominican Republic and Costa Rica have experiences to share.

Group 2. Smallholders concerns

Most farmers in the Latin American and the Caribbean region are smallholders with less than 20 acres. In order to improve their organic production, they need to have access to organic inputs, technical assistance and relevant extension services, as well as to general rural infrastructures and suitable land tenure regimes.

Small farmers could benefit from the establishment of a model farm, which is well connected to local organic outlets such as hotels, groceries and supermarkets. Such a model farm would constitute an important government incentive to farmers seeking to convert to organic agriculture or to improve their systems.

Land systems which are managed organically enhance environmental goods and services which can contribute to income-generation through eco-tourism and, consequently, to rural development.

With a view to strengthening small farmers' self-reliance, education should take a holistic approach. Information and networking should be encouraged. Training should target specific small farmers' problems and build on traditional wisdom and knowledge.

Group 3. Institutional arrangements and the ecosystem approach

There is a need to pool all existing information on organic agriculture in a regional or subregional facility. A suitable information centre such as CABI could house technical information on organic agriculture, such as: organic management of soils, biological plant protection and interactions within agro-ecosystems.

Research, backed-up with adequate funding, should focus on generating new knowledge on the following aspects of organic agriculture: contribution to biodiversity; ecological services; non-economic benefits (environmental, social) and pest and diseases control.

The capacity of national and regional laboratories facilities should be strengthened to develop adapted technologies and appropriate biological control agents, as well as to provide quality assurance systems at national level.

Specific areas for human resource development are already clear. There is need to assess different institutions' capacities to impart organic agriculture education and training. Research, capacity building and development projects should give priority to recruiting regional and local experts. FAO and CABI could coordinate such activities.

Recommendations

I. ORGANIC AGRICULTURE INFORMATION

Identify a regional centre that will be entrusted to identify information needs, gaps and mechanisms for disseminating information on organic agriculture. CABI would be a suitable organic agriculture resource centre for the Latin American and Caribbean Region;

Undertake feasibility studies on the status, potential and limitations of organic agriculture in each country. This baseline information is necessary to identify areas of research and action. FAO, CTA or IICA could assist in launching and coordinating these studies.

Focus attention on the needs of small farmers and operators and promote the development and dissemination of information relevant to their conditions;

Raise awareness and advocate the potential contribution of organic agriculture to rural livelihoods and ecosystem services;

II. ORGANIC AGRICULTURE RESEARCH

Identify, and equip, an existing regional/national research centre that will be entrusted to develop context-specific organic technologies, including, among others, organic agriculture inputs such as biocontrol agents;

Focus organic agriculture research on understanding ecological processes of key importance to biodiversity, soil fertility, plant protection and agro-ecosystem productivity;

Develop an organic research agenda that integrate grassroots needs and traditional knowledge. The research potential of the CARDI, CABI, IICA and UWI should be enhanced to cater for organic agriculture needs;

Support institutions wishing to broaden their mandate to include organic agriculture and support them with adequate funding.

III. ORGANIC AGRICULTURE TRAINING

Develop a holistic approach to training by designing curricula that take into account agronomic, environmental, economic and social parameters influencing choices of different organic cultivation methods;

Strengthen capacities of smallholders with appropriate training and experience - sharing through workshops, documents and visits within and between countries;

Upgrade the expertise of local human resources and extension services and promote twinning arrangements between institutions dealing with organic agriculture in developed and developing countries. FAO and CABI could facilitate this process;

Establish a model organic farm that can assist with replicating experiences in production and marketing of organic produce and services, such as landscape and eco-tourism.

IV. SUPPORT TO ORGANIC AGRICULTURE

Establish a network, which can provide guidance towards ways and means to secure funding, technical assistance and political support. FAO, IICA and CABI could play a major role in creating a support mechanism that would bridge organic operators with governments, the donor community and institutions outside the region.

Roundtable 3: Establishing local organic certification systems in Latin America and the Caribbean: achieving cost-effectiveness and reliability.

This working group was facilitated by Gunnar Rundgren, President, IFOAM and explored the issue of organic certification.

Certification systems

It was noted that certification comes at a relatively high cost. In some countries of Latin America, such as Argentina and Guatemala produce sold to local markets have to meet the same certification requirements as those meant for export.

Regional Certification

This group agreed that regional certification could have several advantages, including a more effective use of resources, economies of scale, cost savings, potential for brand identification on a regional basis, enhancements of regional markets and possibilities for lobbying jointly. A key point of the discussion was that, despite the fact that many of the participants seemed to call for regional rather than national organic standards and certification systems, such a regional agreement would face a number of difficulties including: (i) language barriers; (ii) national politics; (iii) the period of time taken to conclude final negotiations on those standards compared to a national system; (iv) wide differences in the stage of organic development among countries; and (v) the fear that such rules would end up being the lowest common denominator.

However, they expressed the view that regional certification can be secured based on training programmes, standards writing and by tapping resources otherwise not available to national programmes.

The Role of Government

It was stated that legislation is not necessarily a priority. What governments need to do is provide a good infrastructure, extension support, research aids and a good policy framework for the organic sector to flourish. It was felt that governments can also tap into overseas aid from various donors. What is highly important is a dialogue between organic producers and national governments.

Assistance to the Sector

The organic sector needs to become better organized to take advantage of external sources of finance and advice. IFOAM, CDE and CTA are among those which might provide such assistance, in terms of finance, training and through publications.

Roundtable 4: Exporting organic products: post-harvest operations, conservation and transport

This working group was facilitated by Dr Majeed Mohammed, Professor, UWI. Mr Daniele Giovannucci, World Bank Consultant gave a presentation on the “Impact on Organics and New Certification Strategies: The Role and Characteristics of the Coffee Market.”

Recommendations:

I. ESTABLISH DATABASES

Compile a list of common problems and experiences in the area of post-harvest technology for organics. This will form the basis for additional research. Organize once a year, regional stakeholders to resolve post-harvest problems in priority organic products such as: bananas, citrus, mangoes, papaya, avocado, nutmeg and pineapple.

II. PLANNING AND RESOURCES

Organic production needs to include the costs of producer education regarding the market and its needs. The organic system has to be creative in meeting these needs.

There is a need for convergence among producers, consumers and regulatory entities regarding social, economic and environmental issues where all stakeholders seek possible common denominators. Food safety could also fall among these key issues.

III. MARKET RESEARCH

The reliability of the buyer, importer and distributor needs to be determined. Some system is needed to verify and qualify these groups so that the producer does not deal with the unknown.

Regional certification standards can be developed even if products only fit individual niches or specific niche markets.

Round table 5: Domestic markets: an option for organic products in Latin America and the Caribbean?

This working group was facilitated by Dr Andrea Brechelt, Dr in Agrarian Science, Fundación Agricultura y Medio Ambiente, Dominican Republic. Ms Kristina Taboulchanas, International Development Research Centre, gave a presentation on “Exploring Potential Markets for Cuban Organic Produce in Local Tourist Resorts: A Preliminary Study.”

Introduction

For several years, the production and marketing of organic products have been geared solely towards exports. The objective of this working group was to discuss whether the local market could be an interesting and profitable option for organic products.

Deficiencies

A farmer producing a product under special conditions automatically needs a secure market with better prices. Since the majority of producers of organic vegetables and fruits for the national market are small and not well organized, this problem cannot be easily resolved, due to the following deficiencies:

Products are not sufficient to warrant special marketing, distinct from that of conventional agricultural products.

Since there are practically no cooperatives of producers, supply is very unstable and seasonal.

In many countries adequate technology has not yet been put in place.

There is no national scientific research, nor are there any trained technicians in this area.

The presentation of organic products is often inferior.

There are no intermediaries specializing in this market.

Unreliability and lack of professionalism.

Farmers demand excessively high prices.

Resolving this marketing problem is of great importance, because one cannot expect farmers to continue making extra efforts without reaping additional benefits. For them, the advantages of reduced risks of pollution and the effects of their form of production on the environment cannot take priority in an environment in which the farmer generally has to fight for survival on a daily basis. There is a high level of competition from imports of agricultural products and this leaves little flexibility with respect to this decision.

Possibilities

On the other hand there are several very positive possibilities, which must be seriously considered with respect to marketing organic products on the local market. These possibilities are as follows:

Direct producer-consumer contact.

Better prices for the producer.

One of the few possibilities which the small producer has for the future.

Healthy foods for the national consumer.

Possibility of increasing health and environmental awareness of both the producer and national consumers.

Recommendations

In order to improve the situation and to overcome the deficiencies, the following should be envisaged:

I. AT THE LEVEL OF THE PRODUCERS:

Organize organic producers into cooperatives.

Set fair prices and only deliver fresh and high quality products.

Zonal planning of production by section.

Organize transport independently or by means of intermediaries.

Establish regional collection centres.

II. AT ORGANIZATIONAL LEVEL:

Incorporate organic agriculture into the curriculum of universities with schools of agriculture.

Establish a quality control system (national organic seal).

Put in place the necessary infrastructure.

Establish national standards for organic production (Organic Law).

Make arrangements with supermarkets for special sale of organic products.

Set up promotional campaigns through the media.

In order to meet the demand of supermarkets, it is necessary to involve more farmers in organic production. However, of utmost importance would be the establishment of a group of institutions or a company e.g. “National Cooperative for the marketing of Organic products” which would be responsible for assisting farmers in marketing their products, providing transport, maintaining contacts with supermarkets and organizing promotional activities. Such is the role which exporters play in the international market. Experiences of other countries (e.g. Costa Rica) have demonstrated that the process of developing both supply and demand in a balanced manner is a long and complicated one, but it is possible.

Strategic Elements for Consideration by Countries that Seek to Export Organic Vegetables and Fruit: The Case of Central America

Presenter:

Mr Pedro Cussianovich, IICA Representative in Costa Rica

Central America is a region which, given its natural characteristics and area, is closer to the Caribbean than most countries of the South. Organic production in this region has been developing since the late 1980s, especially through initiatives by small farmers supported by some NGOs and cooperation agencies. For various reasons, at their own expense and risk, they have managed to master the technique and in some cases carry out successful export experiences.

In Central America there are currently more than 43 000 farms under organic production. Their average size is under five hectares and there are regions such as Peten, in Guatemala, where mostly indigenous farmers have on average less than half a manzana* (0.7 ha). The main export products are still coffee, cocoa and bananas; nevertheless, there is a strong trend toward diversification.

Levels of progress in organic production are not equal in this region. However, there is a clearly visible presence of NGOs and cooperation agencies working on this theme in the countries, especially in activities to support marketing, training, legislation, organization, funding and certification. The state is notoriously absent in the process of development of organic production, which explains why this activity is not more dynamic. Nevertheless, in some countries a certain level of decision-making and involvement has been attained.

Costa Rica, for example, has a National Organic Agriculture Programme. Through this programme, a participatory national strategy has been taking shape and this has allowed the organic movement to become more visible. Diagnostic processes have led to the development of an Action Plan which has made it possible for policy proposals in support of this activity to be made and adopted by institutions in the sector. Currently a more encompassing policy proposal is being developed, together with a strategy definition to strengthen trade in organic products. National meetings have also been held and farmer training is being provided for farmers to transform their farms. Extension workers in this sector are also being trained.

Since 1996, Costa Rica has had a set of rules and a national system for accreditation and for oversight of certifying agencies, managed by the Office of the Director of Plant Health at the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock. Its regulations have been assessed by a mission of the Office of the Director General of Consumer Protection and Health of the European Commission and a recommendation has been made for the country to be recognized by the European Union as a “third country”. It is important to note that this legislation has been shared with other Central American countries and this has helped make the process of developing legislation in each of them more dynamic.

In Honduras there are no specific policies for organic production; however, there is a growing interest by authorities of the National Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (SAG) in supporting its development. A National Committee on Organic Agriculture has been set up in this country to develop a legal framework for organic production and the National Organic Agriculture and Livestock Raising Programme has been created to promote this activity. An office in charge of “organic products” was established in the year 2000 under the Department of Generation at the Office of the Director of Agricultural Science and Technology (DICTA) and the Plant Diagnostic Department of the National Agricultural Health Service (SENASA), so as to regulate aspects pertaining to the use of inputs in production.

In Guatemala, despite the fact that there is no institutional involvement by the government, a public-private National Committee on Ecological Agriculture was created by a Ministerial Decree in December 1999 to work on draft legislation. Recently, agricultural sector authorities have shown greater interest in participating more decisively in organic production.

Belize is probably the country where the authorities have most clearly decided to support this activity; however, experiences in organic production are few and very recent. Belize has a National Coordinator for organic production, a national association bringing together the various actors involved in the organic movement (the Belizean Organic Product Association - BOPA), and draft legislation on this activity prepared in a participatory manner and coordinated by BOPA.

El Salvador, Nicaragua and Panama are the countries where the agricultural sector authorities are least involved; however, we must note that a significant level of awareness has led some institutions in this sector to undertake initiatives which contribute to the development of this activity. For example, organic production has been included in the research agenda of the offices of the directors of research institutions in these countries. Subsidies have also been created to develop organic production projects, as in the case of Panama where US$150 000 was appropriated for this purpose by Law #25. In the aforementioned countries, with the exception of El Salvador, there are private sector initiatives, involving public officials, working on draft rules for organic production. Panama is the only country in the region which has an association of consumers of organic products (VACURU) and, even though production in this country is just beginning, small amounts of these products can be found in some supermarkets.

While day-to-day organic production techniques become less of a limitation in Central America and make it possible for organic production to expand, in recent times there has been a recurrent concern among producers who face serious difficulties in gaining access of their products to international markets. This concern often turns into frustration when they find no alternatives in local markets; local markets are just beginning to develop in this region. This concern is based on general issues such as:

While there are exports from the region, there is no clearly-defined trade strategy.

Exports are the result of various sorts of initiatives:

Individual exports - businessmen with their own resources.

Brokers and companies who buy products.

Producers' organizations - brokers buy from them and/or act as middlemen.

Organic products are usually outside the value chain.

There are no local markets, but rather points of sale, or marketing experiences.

Most organic farmers sell their products in conventional markets.

The growing frustration of producers due to limited possibilities of placing their products in organic markets led IICA, in coordination with a number of cooperating institutions, NGOs and producers' organizations, to conduct a seminar-workshop to identify guidelines for the construction of a regional strategy for trade in organic products.

For purposes of structure the seminar-workshop was divided into two major areas: International Markets and Local Markets. One conclusion clearly coming out of this activity and based on the characteristics of organic production in the region is that a strategy cannot be defined exclusively to promote exports if local markets are not addressed at the same time.

This conclusion is not only due to strong interrelations and correspondence among variables affecting exports of organic products and those affecting the development of local markets, but also to the limitations of small farmers themselves to leap toward exports on a short-term basis. Local markets are an option for small organic farmers, who are in the majority, to attain sustainability in this activity and as a learning experience to then export.

According to participants in the seminar-workshop, the main limitations which hinder further development of organic product exports are in six basic areas: Legislation, certification, organization, production, information and communication and trade.

The following are the main problems identified in the case of Central America. They affect both exports and the development of local markets.

Legal basis and Certification:

Lack of legislation in the countries to establish norms for this activity.

Each country/continent has its own laws which are different and make it difficult for Central American countries to comply with requirements.

In some countries there are no national certifiers.

Where national certifiers do exist, they face difficulties entering the markets due to lack of recognition and trust in the foreign countries.

Dependency on international certifiers.

High cost of certification for the local market.

Several different certifications are required, depending on the market.

Costs are high (certification for producers and accreditation under international ISO 65 standards for the certifying agency).

Organization:

Geographic dispersion of producers.

Low level of organization of small farmers restricts access to markets (planning of planting, aggregate supply, strategic alliances, bargaining power, receiving services, etc.).

Weak management abilities.

Unconsolidated organic movements (policies).

There are no consumers' organizations.

Production:

Lack of technical assistance in all areas (“chemical culture”).

Low volumes.

Quality and uniformity are not in accordance with market requirements.

Unstable frequency - seasonality.

Limited diversity.

Inappropriate post-harvest handling (packaging).

Differentiation and appearance (packaging, seals, labels).

Little value added (processing).

Plant protection problems during production and storage.

Information and communication:

Scattered information.

Little information on and knowledge of international market opportunities (trading and import firms, market niches, trends, etc.).

Little information on potential export supply of organic products from the region (products, timing, producers, countries).

Little information on local markets (supply and demand).

Little information on what is being done elsewhere (production, research, markets, legislation, etc.).

Lack of information and education for consumers and those responsible for purchasing and points of sale in supermarkets.

Limited dissemination of organic production as a whole.

Trade (marketing):

Few points of sale.

Irregularity of demand.

Limited diversity and volume.

Quality requirements.

Undefined prices.

Uncertainty of supply to the supermarket by supplier.

High cost of operation and differentiation in connection with low volumes.

Space allocation (confuses consumers).

Inadequate handling of the product at points of sale diminishes quality.

Un-“educated” consumers (consumers choose the lower-priced product).

Little space allocation for products in supermarkets.

Limited government support.

Difficulties in managing appropriate export logistics.

Long distances limit delivery of quality product to final destination.

Plant protection measures.

Time for delivery (quality).

In light of the above and given the number of factors that restrict both the export of organic products and the development of local markets, overcoming these limitations will clearly require coordination of all efforts, as well as participation by many individuals, institutions, NGOs, cooperating agencies and others. However, it is possible to identify five strategic variables that with interrelated management, should provide some, but not all the necessary conditions for the development of both markets and the activity as a whole.

Two of these variables are structural and require more active involvement by governments: the development of institutional and policy frameworks and the establishment of legal technical-normative frameworks. The other three: organization, information, training are cross-cutting variables which must come together and be managed at all levels in this activity. Each of these five strategic elements or variables will now be discussed briefly.

Institutional and policy frameworks

Organic production has the same requirements and demand for services as conventional production: technical assistance, research, obtaining and transferring technology, laboratories, irrigation, training, information, funding, incentives, market development, access to land and land tenure, among others.

Since it is not possible to duplicate existing institutional structures to support this activity, it is necessary for the countries to at least establish national organic production programmes, or similar structures entrusted with coordinating and facilitating its promotion.

Resources should be allocated to these programmes and they should have the authority required to strengthen coordination and/or institutional actions in the various areas mentioned above. Special attention should be paid to promoting producers' organizations, establishing information systems in support of decision-making, providing whatever training is required by producers and, primarily, professional and technical workers in the sector.

National programmes or whatever structures are set up must foster policy, action plans and strategy proposals, developed in a participatory manner involving actors in organic activities and based on realistic appraisals. Once these proposals have been studied and approved by decision-makers, they should be binding for the agricultural sector of each country. They will also make the development of this activity become more dynamic through coordination and facilitation of actions and services provided by the state in this area.

Legal and technical-normative frameworks

Organic activities require clarity in legislation, with technical and legal norms regulating production, processing and marketing of products. That legislation must also regulate registration of economic agents; certification, accreditation and operation of certifying agencies; and organic product import procedures, among others.

Legislation developed so far in some countries of the region and that which is under separation are basically consistent with that of the European Union, since this region's was the first to be enacted. Besides being a model, that legislation requires recognition of the equivalence of new regulations adopted in other countries to facilitate direct access of products to European markets. Ensuring consistency with legislation in countries that are considered important trade partners, such as the United States, should be taken into consideration by countries which already have legislation and those which are in the process of enacting legislation.

However, few countries currently have legislation with respect to organic production, and therefore organic activities have to refer to norms set by international certifying agencies, which in turn are linked to those of the main international markets.

The absence of legislation in the countries has not only generated dependence on the international certifying agencies, thereby making certification more expensive, but it has also limited the development of this activity and its markets. Many farmers are not familiar with regulations in force for organic production; there has been a proliferation of “bio” products that put this activity at risk. In instances where there are local markets, these are not certified and there are therefore no guarantees for consumers.

The task of establishing legislation and rules for organic production cannot be postponed. To carry out this process, a recommendation is made to set up National Committees in the countries, which must include representatives from the state and actors involved in the organic movement. The legislation to be enacted should strike a balance between issues pertaining to development of domestic and external markets; it should be prepared in a participatory manner with the actors involved; it must be based on dissemination and discussion with these actors and it should foster recognition among countries and its equivalence with existing regulations in the markets of major trading partners.

Implementation of legislation requires the setting up of an institutional structure which should be independent of the structure to promote this activity, so as to ensure transparency. However, national programmes should play an active role in the process of developing the proposals, by providing opportunities for participation of the various actors. The responsibilities of this institution will include, among others, those of registering and accreditation of certifying agencies; registration of certified economic agents; following up on and oversight of compliance with regulations; carrying out audits, as well as disseminating this information among economic agents involved in this activity.

Organization at the various levels of organic production

With few exceptions, there is an absence of organizational capability among persons involved in organic production at all levels in Latin America and the Caribbean. When organizations do exist, there is likelihood that they have limited entrepreneurial vision and poor management capabilities.

This lack of organizational structures and entrepreneurial capabilities within the organizations is a serious obstacle to the development of organic production. This is so not only from the standpoint of production and trade, as it limits possibilities of receiving services, exchanging experiences, consolidating production and attaining economies of scale in various activities. There is also an absence of legitimized structures representing organic production in various spheres of competence, defining plans and strategies, negotiating with authorities for the development of policies and the seeking solutions to problems that arise.

While the shortcomings of the existing organizations require different types of organizational structures, as an immediate response, it is important to promote the development of at least three types of organizations in the countries:

- An operational structure that fosters the organization and integration of producers into first- and second-level structures, to facilitate the receiving of support services from the state and the private sector and to add to and homogenise production for direct marketing to domestic and international markets.

- A second, representative type of organization that promotes national integration of all the actors involved in organic production (producers, processors, traders, researchers, government, NGOs, supermarkets, consumers, etc.) in a legitimized structure of the organic movement. Through coordination of actions, this structure should support efforts to promote the activity, represent its interests and unify criteria, as well as long-term strategies.

- A third type of structure should bring consumers of organic products together in a national organization, so as to foster the development of local markets through the establishment and consolidation of a sustained demand for organic products.

To carry out any of these initiatives clearly requires a body responsible for facilitating the process, and here national programmes to promote organic production should play a major role. Training in management to help strengthen the organizational structure is important in any effort to promote the organization of the actors involved, whether they are producers, processors, traders, consumers, or others.

Information Systems

Information is scarce and scattered for all aspects of organic activities and when it does exist, access is difficult. This restricts its use in the decision-making processes. It is in the hands of the producers, researchers, traders, NGOs, technical workers, inspectors and certifying agencies, who occasionally share it, but generally it is not disseminated enough to foster enhanced dynamics in organic activities.

While some efforts have been made in Latin America and the Caribbean to do the groundwork for computerized data systems to collate information, and these are significant contributions, the truth is that such efforts are limited in terms of reaching persons who do not have access to these technologies. Consumers, who are important actors in the development of this activity, are also left out.

From this standpoint, an initiative for countries to address this issue should clearly promote information systems that include ways to make information more systematic, collate and disseminate it. They should also designate an agency responsible for coordinating this task. The various users should have ready access to these systems, which should allow interactions among the actors involved.

The systems to be set up should contain useful information on production, processing, trade, markets (domestic and international) and existing regulations, as well as information pertaining to this activity, whether technical, legal, service-related or other information that might interest the various users and especially consumers.

Together with this initiative, there is a need for information and education programmes through the mass media, so as to promote organic products and their benefits among the public. This should have an impact on the establishment and consolidation of demand for these products. Such actions must include a strategy to involve the media in activities carried out by the organic movement.

A complementary strategic component to attain a multiplier effect should be the design of information and education programmes for grade- and secondary-school students, who are the main agents for change in consumption habits and the development of an awareness at the home.

Training

As an activity that has been re-discovered in recent times, there are many gaps in knowledge about organic production. Despite producers' technological progress, there is a strong demand for training in organic production and this surpasses institutional capabilities, even though many such demands are basically the same as those for conventional production. The establishment of a national training programme in this productive activity cannot be postponed.

In addition to dealing with the limitations of institutional response to the need for training as in conventional agriculture, organic production has the additional problem of a lack of institutional capability to satisfy a type of demand - especially in the area of production - for which professional and technical workers were not prepared. Therefore, the main efforts of a national training programme, at least in its initial stage, should focus on training professional and technical workers in the agricultural sector, so they can have a multiplier effect as agents of change.

Producers' demand for training shows that actions in this regard should concentrate primarily on farm transformation, management, production planning and agro-industrial processing and without restricting them to these areas. Training programmes in connection with trade should enhance producers' familiarity with how the market functions and with regulations and should also emphasize aspects of marketing and markets, such as: quality, safety, post-harvest handling, packaging and transportation and contractual relations, among others, as well as the organization and management of marketing.

Identification, systematization and the use of successful experiences carried out by economic agents involved in organic production activities will be very useful to support training exercises. Insofar as resources are available, horizontal training programmes should be established, so as to expand horizons of knowledge through other countries' experience.

Finally, curricula of higher agricultural education should be modified to ensure the continued availability of technical assistance by professional and technical workers for organic production. This would involve new courses and, as far as possible, open new career programmes to promote organic production.

APPENDICES

Programme

Sunday, 7 October 2001

1400-1800 Registration

Day 1

Monday, 8 October 2001

0800 Registration

0900 Welcome remarks by Chairman

- FAO: Mr David W. Bowen, FAO Representative in Trinidad and Tobago

Greetings

- IICA: Dr H. Arlington D. Chesney, Director, Caribbean Regional Centre and Representative in Trinidad and Tobago

- CDE: Mr Gary Aylmer, Head, Caribbean Field Office

- CTA: Ms Isolina Boto, Deputy Head, Seminars and Studies Department

- CABI Bioscience: Dr Moses Kairo, Director

Feature Address

- Senator Dr The Hon. Jennifer Jones-Kernahan, Minister for Food Production and Marine Resources

Vote of Thanks

    - Mr Swallay Mohammed, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Food Production and Marine Resources

1000 Coffee break

1. The World Markets for Organic Fruit and Vegetables: current situation and prospects

Chairman: Paul Pilkauskas, Senior Commodity Specialist and Pascal Liu, Commodity Specialist, FAO, Italy

1015 The markets in Europe

Speaker:

- Paul Pilkauskas

1100 The US market

Speaker:

- Rudy Kortbech-Olesen, Senior Market Development Adviser, ITC, Switzerland and Tim Larsen, ITC Consultant, United States of America

1130 The Japanese market

Speaker:

- Bart Vrolijk, Agricultural Trade Specialist, FAO, Italy

1145 Discussion

1230 Export market opportunities for countries of the Latin America/ Caribbean region

Speaker:

- Bas Schneiders, International Sourcing Manager, Weleda AG, Germany

1300-1430 Lunch break

2. Market Access Issues: Standards and Regulations

Chairman: Rudy Kortbech-Olesen

1430 Standards and guidelines for organic production, processing, labelling and marketing

θ Organic standards in importing countries: differences and similarities

Speaker:

- Gunnar Rundgren, IFOAM President, ex-member of the Standard Committee, Sweden

q USDA's national organic rule

Speaker:

- Jim Riddle, Director, Program Development, National Organic Program, USDA, United States of America

1600 Coffee break

1615 Regulations for the importation and labelling of organic foods in the European Union

θ Certification requirements in the main markets: current and future requirements

q Different approaches to certification equivalence

q Accreditation of certification bodies

Speaker:

- Bo Van Elzakker, Director, AgroEco/IOAS, The Netherlands

1645 Discussion

1800 End of Day 1

Day 2 Tuesday, 9 October 2001

3. Producing and Exporting Organic Horticultural Products in Latin America and the Caribbean

Chairperson: Judith Ann Francis, Regional Coordinator (CARIFRUIT), IICA, Trinidad and Tobago

0830 Overview of organic agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean

Speaker:

- Pipo Lernoud, IFOAM Representative for Latin America, Argentina

0900 Producing organic horticultural products in Latin America and the Caribbean

q Assessing the profitability of converting to organic farming. Key parameters to analyse

q Economic analysis of organic vs. conventional production in Cuba, Costa Rica and Spain

Speakers:

- María del Carmen Pérez, Director, IACNET, Cuba

- Pedro Cussianovich, Representative, IICA, Costa Rica

- Pascal Liu, FAO

1030 Coffee break

1100 Producing organic horticultural products (continued)

q Potential benefits and constraints

q New techniques and inputs

Speaker:

- Laura Montenegro, Director, Argencert, Argentina

q Challenges and opportunities for pest management in organic systems

Speaker:

- Jim Waller, CABI Bioscience, United Kingdom

1200 Discussion

1300-1430 Lunch break

4. Establishing an Organic Export Sector

Chairman: Mr Gunnar Rundgren

1430 Country case studies: lessons learnt and success factors

q Trinidad (Joan Petersen, Organic Agronomist, CARDI)

q Argentina (Laura Montenegro, Argencert)

q Chile (Bart Vrolijk, FAO)

q The Dominican Republic (Moses Kairo, CABI)

q Uganda (Bo Van Elzakker, AgroEco/IOAS)

1600 Coffee break

1615 Discussion

1645 Sources of information and possible technical assistance in Latin America and the Caribbean

q Sources of information and extension needs for organic production

Speaker:

- Robert Taylor, Content Manager (Animal Sciences) CAB International, United Kingdom

q Presentation of the IICA Agri-entrepreneur distance learning course on organic horticulture and electronic network

Speaker:

- Francois Dagenais, Representative IICA, Barbados

q Technical assistance from FAO, CTA, CDE and ITC

Speakers:

- Nadia Scialabba, Secretary of the Working Group on Organic Agriculture, FAO, Italy

- Isolina Boto, Deputy Head, Seminars and Studies Department, CTA

- Henriette Acquah Dodet Malenge, CDE, Belgium

- Rudy Kortbech-Olesen, Switzerland

1800 End of Day 2 Programme

Day 3 Wednesday, 10 October 2001

0830 Thematic Roundtables

Roundtable 1 - Developing national organic standards and complying with those of importing countries

Moderator: Bo Van Elzakker, AgroEco/IOAS

Roundtable 2 - Organic production: a fundamental change in farming methods?

• Meeting farmers needs for information on organic production systems

• Building and maintaining soil fertility in tropical countries

• Control of pests and diseases

Moderator: Nadia Scialabba, FAO

Creating an island industry: composting of organic waste from natural resources - Presenter Rick Morris, Owner, The Compost Farm, United States of America

Roundtable 3 - Establishing local organic certification systems in Latin America and the Caribbean: achieving cost-effectiveness and reliability

Moderator: Gunnar Rundgren, IFOAM

Roundtable 4 - Exporting organic products: post-harvest operations, conservation and transport

• Conservation and storage

• Processing organic products (e.g. dried fruits)

• Shipping organic products to remote markets

Moderator: Majeed Mohammed, Senior Lecturer, Department of Food Production, University of the West Indies

Impact on organics and new certification strategies: the role and characteristics of the coffee markets - Presenter: Daniele Giovannucci, World Bank Consultant, United States of America

Roundtable 5 - Domestic markets: an option for organic products?

Moderator: Andrea Brechelt, President, Exproeco C.por, Dominican Republic

Exploring potential markets for Cuban organic produce in local tourist resorts: a preliminary study - Presenter: Kristina Taboulchanas, Research Associate, International Development Research Centre, Cuba

1200-1330 Lunch break

1330 Roundtables (continued)

1530 Coffee break

1600 Concluding Session

1600 Roundtable Recommendations

1645 Market opportunities and challenges for countries of Latin America and the Caribbean

Speaker:

- Paul Pilkauskas, FAO

1700 Strategic elements for consideration by countries that seek to export organic vegetables and fruit: the case of Central America

Speaker:

- Pedro Cussianovich, IICA

1800 End of Conference

1830 Social evening hosted by the Ministry of Food Production and Marine Resources

DAY 4 Thursday, 11 October 2001

Field visit

A Forum for Business Contacts

List of Delegates

Africa

CAMEROON

Mr Jean-Martin Tetang

General Manager

Export Agro Sarl

BP 4524 Douala

Tel: (237) 37.45.07; 70.68.65

Fax: (237) 37.45.07

Email: exa@iccnet2000.com

Asia

MALAYSIA

Mr Khairuddin Md Tahir

Chief Executive Officer

International Tropical Fruits Network (TFNET)

Box 334, UPM Post Office

43400 Serdang, Selangor

Tel: (603) 8941-6590

Fax: (603) 8941-6591

Email: Khair63@mailcity.com

ceo@itfnet.org

TFNET@mardi.my

Website: www.mardi.my/TFNET

Caribbean

ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA

Mr Albert Fredericks

Marketing Officer

Central Marketing Corporation

P.O. Box 439

St John's

Tel: (268) 462-2569

Fax: (268) 462-4723

BARBADOS

Dr Gene Pollard

Regional Plant Protection Officer

Multidisciplinary Team

Sub-Regional Office for the Caribbean

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United

Nations (FAO)

6th Floor - Tom Adams Financial Centre

P.O. Box 631-C

Bridgetown

Tel: (246) 426-7110/7111 (Ext. 247)

Fax: (246) 427-6075

Email: Gene.Pollard@fao.org

Dr Lystra Fletcher-Paul

Integrated Natural Resources Management Officer

Multidisciplinary Team

Sub-Regional Office for the Caribbean

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United

Nations (FAO)

6th Floor - Tom Adams Financial Centre

P.O. Box 631-C

Bridgetown

Tel: (246) 426-7110/7111 (Ext. 254)

Fax: (246) 427-6075

Email: Lystra.FletcherPaul@fao.org

Mr Richard B. Knight

Chief Executive Officer

Barbados Agricultural Development and

Marketing Corporation

Fair Valley

Christ Church

Tel: (246) 428-1743

Fax: (246) 428-0152

Email: badmcceo@sunbeach.net

Dr Francois Dagenais

Representative in Barbados and Coordinator of

the Distance Learning Centre for Rural

Development

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture

P.O. Box 705

Bridgetown

Dalmeny, Pine Hill, St Michael

Tel: (246) 427-4740/4721/4722

Fax: (246) 429-3509

Email: sprescod@iica.com.bb

Ms Lynda Seon

Export Business Advisor

Caribbean Export Development Agency

P.O. Box 34B, Brittons Hill

Mutual Building

Hastings, Christ Church

Tel: (246) 436-0578

Fax: (246) 436-9999

Email: lseon@carib-export.com

CUBA

Sr. Arnaldo Correa

Asesor

Instituto de Investigaciones en Fruticultura

Tropical

Avenida 7ma No. 3005 Entre Calle 30 y 32

Miramar, Playa

La Habana 11300

Tel: (537) 2093585

Fax: (537) 246794

Email: iicit@ceniai.inf.cu

Dra. María del Carmen Pérez Hernández

Director

Instituto de Investigaciones de Citricos y otros

Frutales

Avenida 7ma No. 3005 Entre Calle 30 y 32

Miramar, Playa

La Habana 11300

Tel: (537) 2093585

Fax: (537) 246794

Email: iicit@ceniai.inf.cu

Sr. Luis Germán Morales

Jefe Grupo de Agricultura Orgánica

Instituto de Investigaciones de Citricos y otros

Frutales

Avenida 7ma No. 3005 Entre Calle 30 y 32

Miramar, Playa

La Habana 11300

Tel: (537) 2093585

Fax: (537) 246794

Email: iicit@ceniai.inf.cu

Srta. Esther Lilia Peralta Garcia

RIAC Cuba - Centro Nacional de Sanidad

Agropecuaria

Código Postal 11600

La Habana

Tel: (537) 2093585

Fax: (537) 246794

Email: varadero01@hotmail.com

DOMINICA

Mr Kervin Stephenson

General Manager

Dominica Banana Marketing Corporation

Vanoulst House, P.O. Box 1620

Roseau

Tel: (767) 448-2671/2277

(767) 235-2043 (Cellular)

Fax: (767) 448-6445

Email: kstephenson@dbmc-dm.com

dbmc@cwdom.dm

Mr Lloyd Pascal

Market Development Officer

Direct Trading

Dominica Export Import Agency (DEXIA)

Bay Front, P.O. Box 173

Roseau

Tel: (767) 448-3494/3495/2780

Fax: (767) 448-6308

Email: dexia@cwdom.dm

Website: www.dexiaexport.com

Mr David Lang

Director

ESPWA

William, P.O. Box 2071

Roseau

Tel: (767) 446-1702/1703

Email: cegivex@cwdom.dm

Mr Manley James

Agronomist/Team Leader

Ministry of Agriculture and the Environment

Government Headquarters

Roseau

Tel: (767) 442-2401

Fax: (767) 448-8444

Mr Joseph Peltier

Board Member

Nature Island Pineapple Producers' Association

Stock Farm

Roseau

Tel: (767) 448-8182

Fax: (767) 448-2308

Ms Roseanna Nelson

Member

Giraudel Horticulture Group

Windward Islands Farmers' Association (WINFA)

Giraudel

Roseau

Tel: (767) 448-3150

Fax: (767) 448-2308

Email: spat@cwdom.dm

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Mr Gary Aylmer

Head

Caribbean Field Office

Centre for the Development of Enterprise

Calle 6, No. 10 Ensanche Paraiso

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 683-4772; 375-0581

Fax: (809) 375-0581

Email: cde.car@codetel.net.do

Sr. Evelio Cabrera

Project Manager

Agriculture and Natural Resources

United States Agency for International

Development (USAID)

Embajada de los Estados Unidos de América

Pedro Henríquez Ureña #133

Edificio Reyna 1, Tercer Piso

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 227-0110 (Ext. 253)

(809) 710-1480 (Cellular)

Fax: (809) 732-9403

Email: ecabrera@usaid.gov

Ing. Agr. Amable Ulises Montás

Presidente

Capítulo Agricultura Orgánica

Colegio Dominicano de Ingenieros Arquitectos y

Agrimensores (CODIA)

Padre Billini No. 58, Zona Colonial

Apdo. Postal 1514, Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 687-8275/8168/8198/6835

(809) 563-6677 (Ofic); 520-0620 (Pager)

Fax: (809) 689-9604

Email: codia@tricom.net

Home Page: www.codia.org.do

Sr. Cristobal Astacio

Director Ejecutivo

Fundación Dominicana Para el Desarrollo el Café

de Calidad, Inc (FUNDOCCAFE)

C/Rafael Augusto Sánchez, Eng. Lope de Vega

Plaza Intercaribe, Suite 602-E

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 412-2679; 476-6739

Cel: (809) 519-5657

Fax: (809) 412-2679

Email: frankastacio@yahoo.com

Sr. Odelys Jimenez

Departamento de Sanidad Vegetal

Secretaría de Estado de Agricultura

Santo-Domingo

Tel: (809) 553-3804

Fax: (809) 553-3804

Email: odelys_01hotmail.com

Dra. Andrea Brechelt

Presidente

Exproeco C.por

Fundación Agricultura y Medio Ambiente

Apartado Postal 21064 (Huacal)

Calle Leonor Feltz N0 40, Mirador sur

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 482-0561

Fax: (809) 482-0561

Email: exproeco@hotmail.com

fama@codetel.net.do

Sr. Gustavo Armando Gandini

Presidente

Asociación Dominicana de Agricultura Orgánica

Apartado Postal 1175

Santiago

Tel: (809) 247-5575

Fax: (809) 247-5585

Email: liga.sa@codetel.net.do

Dr Santiago Castillo P.

CITREX Dominicana, S.A.

Cayetano Germosen #66

Jardines del Sur

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 535-6935

Fax: (809) 535-2402

Email: citrex.dom@codetel.net.do

Sr Isidoro de la Rosa

Presidente

Confederación Nacional de Cacaocultores

Dominicanos Inc. (CONACADO)

Apt. Postal No. 3904

C/Transito Dominicano #1

Piedra Blanca, Haina

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 541-8333; 542-8406/7

Fax: (809) 542-3441

Email: conacado.inc@codetel.net.do

Sr Dios Vigildo Uceta

Sub-Director Ejecutivo

Consejo Dominicano del Café (CODOCAFE)

C/o Damirón esq. Jimenez Moyo

Centro de los Héroes

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 532-9358; 533-0186

(809) 350-3190 (Cellular)

Fax: (809) 535-3894

Email: codocafe@www.com

Sr Ulrich Findel

Coordinador Centroamerica y el Caribe

BCS Öko-Garantie GmbH

Av. José Contreras No. 66 Zona Universitaria

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 532-3532

Fax: (809) 532-3556

Email: uli@findel.net

bcs.dom@codetel.net.do

Sr Pilar Emilio Ramírez

Coordinador, República Dominicana

BCS Öko-Garantie GmbH

Av. José Contreras #66, Zona Universitaria

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 532-3532

Fax: (809) 532-3556

Email: bcs.dom@codetel.net.do

Mr Rigoberto Diaz Gonzales

Vice-President

Productos Biológicos Domincanos (PROBIO S.A.)

Av. Abraham Lincoln #468

Plaza Franceca Suite No. 217

Tel: (809) 227-0939

(809) 299-0364 (Cellular)

Fax: (809) 732-4848

Email: probiosa@codetel.net.do

Sr José Bienvenido Carvajal Madina

Fundación Moscoso Puello

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 566-4898

(809) 594-2632 (Residence)

Fax: (809) 567-9622

Email: lennis.feliz@codetel.net.do

Sr Ramon Alberto Roa

Program Associate

Entrena S.A.

Rafael P. Bonnelly #2 E.M.

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 563-1180

Fax: (809) 563-1171

Email: unidad.apoyo@codetel.net.do

Sr Miguel Ant. Melo

Vice President/Administrator

Americo Melo & Company

Anacaona N° 14. Apartado N° 49

Barahona

Tel: (809) 524-2440/5757

Fax: (809) 524 2587

Email: americo.meloexa@codetel.net.do

Sr Oded Heffes

Import/Export Manager

Fenix Trading

8357 Billini #3. Altos de Arroyo Hondo

Santo Domingo

Tel: (809) 378-0392

Fax: (809) 378-0398

Email: d.heffes@codetel.net.do

GRENADA

Mr John Viechweg

Marketing Manager

Grenada Marketing and National Importing Board

Young Street, P.O. Box 652

St George's

Tel: (473) 440-1791/1792/0911/0914

Fax: (473) 440-4152

Email: mnib@caribsurf.com

crei@btl.net

Mr Daniel Lewis

Executive Chairman

Grenada Banana Cooperative Society

Scott Street

St George's

Tel: (473) 440-2473/2486

Fax: (473) 444-4799

Email: gbcs@caribsurf.com

Dr Malachy Dottin

Research Director

Ministry of Agriculture

Botanical Gardens

St George's

Tel: (473) 440-2708/3088

Fax: (473) 440-4191

Email: Malachyd@hotmail.com

Mr Cecil Winsborrow

Chief Agronomist

Ministry of Agriculture

Botanical Gardens

St George's

Tel: (473) 440-2708/3088

Fax: (473) 440-4191

Mr Roland Courtney

Field Inspector

Grenada Co-perative Nutmeg Association (GCNA)

Lagoon Road, P.O. Box 160

St George's

Tel: (473) 440-2117/2714/2217

Fax: (473) 440-6602

Email: gcna.nutmeg@caribsurf.com

GUADELOUPE

M. Claude Vuillaume

Encargado de Cooperación

Département des Productions Fruitères et

Horticoles Centre de Coopération Internationale

en Recherche Agronomique pour le

Développement (CIRAD)

Station Cirad de Neufchâteau

97130 Capesterre Belle Eau

Tel: (590) 86.17.59/86.30.21

Fax: (590) 86.80.77

Email: claude.vuillaume@cirad.fr

Mr Joseph A. Toribio

Plant Pathologist

Unité de Recherches en Productions Végétales Domaine de Duclos (INRA Centre Antilles-Guyane)

97170 Petit-Bourg

Tel: (590) 25.59.28/25.59.45

Fax: (590) 94.11.72

Email: toribio@antilles.inra.fr

GUYANA

Mr Lachman Dasrat

Agronomy Manager

Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc. (GUYSUCO)

LBI Estate, East Coast Demerara

Tel: (592) 22-06807/02261

Fax: (592) 22-04027

Email: bdasrat@yahoo.com

Dr Harold Davis

Agriculture Director

Agricultural Research Centre

Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc. (GUYSUCO)

LBI Estate, East Coast Demerara

Tel: (592) 22-06807/02261

Fax: (592) 22-04027

Email: haroldd@guysuco.com

adgsc@guyana.net.gy

Dr Patrick Chesney

Technical Manager

Cocoa Project

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on

Agriculture

18 Brickdam, Georgetown

P.O. Box 10-1089

Tel: (592) 22-68835/68397

Fax: (592) 22-58358

Email: echesney-iica@sdnp.org

Mr Dalchand Lakhan

Research Assistant

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on

Agriculture

18 Brickdam, Georgetown

P.O. Box 10-1089

Tel: (592) 22-68835/68397

Fax: (592) 22-58358

Email: dplakhan@yahoo.com

Mr Benedict Dias

Chairman

Mabarama/Hosororo Organic Cocoa Growers'

Association (MHOCGA)

C/o Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on

Agriculture

18 Brickdam, P.O. Box 10-1089

Georgetown

Tel: (592) 22-68835; 777-5080

Fax: (592) 22-58358; 777-5080

Email: iica@guyana.net.gy

HAITI

M. Jean-Maurice Buteau

President

JMB S.A. Mango Export

Rt National 41

Impass, Cazeau

P.O. Box 13483

Port-au-Prince

Tel: (509) 250-5985

Fax (509) 250-5942

Email: jmbuteau@mango-haiti.com

Dr Joel Ducasse

President & General Manager

Bio-Récolte S.A.

C/o El Rancho Hotel

Impasse des Hotels Pétion-ville

P.O. Box 71

Port-au-Prince

Sabre UI 1832

Tel: (509) 257-0396

Fax: (509) 257-4134

Email: biorsa@yahoo.com

jdmetro_2000@yahoo.com

Mrs Elisabeth Silvéra-Ducasse

Managing Director

El Rancho Hotel

Impasse des Hotels Pétion-ville

P.O. Box 71

Port-au-Prince

Tel: (509) 257-2080/2082/2083

(509) 257-2084/4926

Fax: (509) 257-4134

Email: elrancho@acn2.net

Website: www.elrancho.inhaiti.com

M. Paul Duret

173, Avenue Jean Paul II (Turgeau)

B.P. 2129

Port-au-Prince

Tel: (509) 244-0735

Fax: (509) 244-0735

Email: plduret@yahoo.fr

JAMAICA

Dr Percy Miller, Jr.

Secretary/Manager

Citrus Growers' Association Limited

P.O. Box 80, Bog Walk Post Office

Saint Catherine

Tel: (876) 708-2052/2053

Fax: (876) 708-2051

Email: ville.cga@cwjamalca.com

Mrs Janet Conie

Director of Research

Banana Export Company Limited (BECO)

1A Braemar Avenue

Kingston 10

Tel: (876) 978-5758; 978-8762/8763

Fax: (876) 978-6069

Email: beco@cwjamaica.com

janetc@cwjamaica.com

Dr Joseph Lindsay

Senior Director

Research and Development Division

Ministry of Agriculture

Hope Gardens

Kingston 6

Tel: (876) 983-2267

(876) 969-3448 (Home)

(876) 791-1451 (Cellular)

Fax: (876) 983-2822

Email: jlindsay@mail.com

jlindsay@uwimona.edu.jm

Mr Vitus Evans

Chief Executive Officer

Jamaica Agricultural Development Foundation

(JADF)

17 Ruthven Road

Kingston 10

Tel: (876) 929-8090/8092

Fax: (876) 929-8093

Email: jadf@infochan.com

vevans@infochan.com

Ms Sheila J. Heaven

Manager

Corporate Affairs

Jamaica Agricultural Development Foundation

(JADF)

17 Ruthven Road

Kingston 10

Tel: (876) 929-8090/8092

Fax: (876) 929-8093

Email: sheaven@infochan.com

jadf@infochan.com

Mr Markus Braun

Farmer/Director

Jamaica Organic Agriculture Movement (JOAM)

Lambs River Post Office

Westmoreland

Tel: (876) 997-5068

Fax: (876) 997-5068

Email: marcusbraun68@hotmail.com

Mr Andrew Mighty

Market Research Officer

Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO)

35 Trafalgar Road

Kingston 10

Tel: (876) 929-9450/9461

Fax: (868) 960-8082/8041

Email: amighty@jamprocorp.com

MARTINIQUE

Mr Alain Soler

Agronomist

Centre de Coopération Internationale en

Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement

(CIRAD-FLHOR)

Route de Moutte, 97202

Fort-de-France

Tel: (596) 71.92.01

Fax: (596) 63.07.24

Email: alain.soler@cirad.fr

NEVIS

Mr Lloyd Lescott

Director

Nevis Island Administration

Pinney's Estate

Charlestown

West Indies

Tel: (869) 469-5521

Fax: (869) 469-0672

Mr Keithly Amory

Ministry of Agriculture, Lands, Housing,

Cooperatives and Fisheries

Nevis Island Administration

Prospect Estate

P.O. Box 644

Tel: (869) 469-5521

Fax: (868) 469-1698

Email: psalhc@hotmail.com

Ms Muriel Emontine Thompson

Farmer

Brown Hill Village

St John Parish

Tel: (869) 469-5871

Email: emontine@hotmail.com

ST KITTS

Mr Kenroy Johnson

Farmer

Newland Housing Development

New Road Housing

P.O. Box 1334, St Peters

Basseterre

Tel: (869) 466-2521 (Ext. 1130)

(868) 466-7060 (home)

Email: kenroyjs@hotmail.com

SAINT LUCIA

Mr Donal Pierse

Business Development Director

Windward Islands Banana Development and

Exporting Company (WIBDECO)

P.O. Box 115

Castries

Tel: (758) 452-2411

Fax: (758) 453-1638

Mr Eardley Barrett

Manager

Certification Unit

Windward Islands Banana Development and

Exporting Company (WIBDECO)

P.O. Box 115

Castries

Tel: (758) 452-2411

Fax: (758) 453-1638

Mr German Cadavid

Manager

Organic Banana Development Programme

Windward Islands Banana Development and

Exporting Company (WIBDECO)

P.O. Box 115

Castries

Tel: (758) 452-2411

Fax: (758) 453-1638

Mrs Joan John-Norville

Acting Deputy Director of Agricultural Services

Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry & Fisheries

5th Floor, Sir Stanislaus James Building

Waterfront

Castries

Tel: (758) 468-4103

Fax: (758) 453-6314

Email: ps@slumaffe.org

Website: www.slumaffe.org

Mr Erasmus Alfred

President

St Lucia Fresh Produce Exporters Association

P O Box 1416

Castries

Mr Michael Augustine

General Manager

St Lucia Marketing Board

P.O. Box 441

Castries

Mr Vincent La Corbiniere

Marketing and Production Officer

St Lucia Rural Enterprise Project

P.O. Box CH2C, La Fargue, Choiseul

Tel: (758) 459-3966/3967

Fax: (758) 459-3965

Email: slrep@candw.lc

ST VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES

Mr Clairmont Cordice

Produce Manager

St Vincent Marketing Corporation

P.O. Box 872

Upper Bay Street

Kingstown

Tel: (784) 457-1603

Fax: (784) 456 2673

Email: svmc@caribsurf.com

Mr Clive Bishop

St Vincent Marketing Corporation

Upper Bay Street

P.O. Box 872

Kingstown

Tel: (784) 457-1603

Fax: (784) 456 2673

Email: svmc@caribsurf.com

Ms Hella Lipper

Fair Trade Manager

Windward Islands Farmers' Association

P.O. Box 817

Kingstown

Tel: (784) 456-2704

Fax: (784) 456-1383

Email: winfa@caribsurf.com

winfairtrade@vincysurf.com

Mr Sylvester M.R. Vanloo

Assistant Operations Manager

St Vincent Banana Growers' Association

C/o P.O. Box 10, Sharpe Street

Kingstown

Tel: (784) 457-1605

Fax: (784) 456-2585

Email: sylvanloo@caribsurf.com

SURINAME

Mr Gerrit Breinburg

Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Husbandry and

Fisheries

Letitia Vriesdelaan, 10

Paramaribo

Tel: (597) 476887

Fax: (597) 470301

Email: dirlvv@sr.net

Ms Soesila Ramautar

Research Division

Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Husbandry and

Fisheries

Letitia Vriesdelaan

Paramaribo

Tel: (597) 476887

Fax: (597) 470301

Email: dirlvv@sr.net

Mr S.W. Esajas

Advisor

Stichting Agrarische Ontwikkeling Binnenland

Coppenamestraat 117

Paramaribo

Tel: (597) 463062

Fax: (597) 483170

Email: hcoulor@hotmail.com

Mr Anand Ramkisoensing

Agronomist/Production Manager

EcoAgro Suriname

Kankantriestraat 9

Paramaribo

Tel: (597) 400030

(597) 08867273 (Cellular)

Fax: (597) 400030

Email aramban@cq-link.sr

Mr Hesdy Omskerk

Fruit Crop Specialist

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on

Agriculture

Cultuurtuinlaan

Oude directeurswoning Boven

P.O. Box 1895

Paramaribo

Tel: (597) 410861

Fax: (597) 410722

Email: iica@sr.net

homskerk@yahoo.com

Mr Arnold Lifo Sjoe

Deputy Director

Agriculture Department

SURLAND

Jarikaba

Tel: (597) 328074/328175

Fax: (597) 328015

Email: surland@sr.net

adlifosjoe@sr.net

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Mr David W. Bowen

FAO Representative

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United

Nations (FAO)

134-138 Frederick Street

P.O. Box 822

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 625-0467/0468; 623-5175

Fax: (868) 623-0995

Email: FAO-TTO@field.fao.org

Dr H. Arlington D. Chesney

Director, Caribbean Regional Centre and

Representative in Trinidad and Tobago

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on

Agriculture

3 Herbert Street

St Clair

Tel: (868) 628-4403

Fax: (868) 628-4562

Email: iicatt@iicacarc.org

hchesney@iicacarc.org

Mr Bobb Nahram Ramnanan

Assistant to the Director

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on

Agriculture

3 Herbert Street

St Clair

Tel: (868) 628-4403

Fax: (868) 628-4562

Email: iicatt@iicacarc.org

Ms Judith Ann Francis

Regional Coordinator (CARIFRUIIT)

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on

Agriculture

3 Herbert Street

St Clair

Tel: (868) 628-4403

Fax: (868) 628-4562

Email: jaf@iicacarc.org

Dr Moses Kairo

Director

CABI Biosience

Caribbean and Latin American Centre

Gordon Street

Curepe

Tel: (868) 645-7628; 662-4173

Fax: (868) 663-2859

Email: m.kairo@cabi.org

Mr Perry Polar

CABI Biosience

Caribbean and Latin American Centre

Gordon Street

Curepe

Tel: (868) 645-7628; 662-4173

Fax: (868) 663-2859

Email: p.polar@cabi.org

Mrs Indra Furlonge-Kelly

Director

Horticulture Services Division

Ministry of the Environment

Botanic Gardens, Cotton Hill

St Clair

Tel: (868) 628-3092

Fax: (868) 622-9131

Email: indradg@hotmail.com

Mr Lloyd Gellineau

Agricultural Officer

Ministry of the Environment

Botanic Gardens, Cotton Hill

St Clair

Tel: (868) 628-3092

Fax: (868) 622-9131

Email: indradg@hotmail.com (in care of)

Dr George Bala

Plant Pathologist

Agricultural Research Division

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

St Clair Circle

St Clair

Tel: (868) 622-1221/1222/1223/1224

Fax: (868) 622-4246

Email: ps1mfpmr@tstt.net.tt

Ms Cynthra Persad

Deputy Director

Agricultural Research Division

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

Central Experiment Station

Centeno, Via Arima Post Office

Arima

Tel: (868) 642-6008

Fax: (868) 646-1646

Email: cynthra@tstt.net.tt

Mr Simon Bedasie

Agronomist

Agricultural Research Division

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

St Clair Circle

St Clair

Tel: (868) 622-1221/1222/1223/1224

Fax: (868) 622-4246

Email: ps1mfpmr@tstt.net.tt

Mr Ian Fletcher

Agricultural Officer I

Regional Administration North

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

St Clair Circle

St Clair

Tel: (868) 622-1221/1222/1223/1224

Fax: (868) 622-4246

Email: ps1mfpmr@tstt.net.tt

Ms Sheryll Ramroop

Agricultural Officer I

Regional Administration North

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

St Clair Circle

St Clair

Tel: (868) 622-1221/1222/1223/1224

Fax: (868) 622-4246

Email: ps1mfpmr@tstt.net.tt

Ms Merle Seedial-Ramjit

Agricultural Officer I

Extension, Training and Information

Services Division

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

St Clair Circle

St Clair

Tel: (868) 622-1221/1222/1223/1224

Fax: (868) 622-4246

Email: ps1mfpmr@tstt.net.tt

Ms Chandrawti Kissun-Ali

Agricultural Officer I

Agricultural Services Division

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

St Clair Circle

St Clair

Tel: (868) 622-1221/1222/1223/1224

Fax: (868) 622-4246

Email: ps1mfpmr@tstt.net.tt

Ms Cindy Rampersadsingh

Ag. Senior Project Analyst II

Agricultural Planning Division

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

St Clair Circle

St Clair

Tel: (868) 622-1221/1222/1223/1224

Fax: (868) 622-4246

Email: ps1mfpmr@tstt.net.tt

Ms Charmaine Lewis

Agricultural Officer I

Regional Administration South

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

Princess Town

Tel: (868) 655-7526/5637/3428

Fax: (868) 655-7526/5637/3428

Email: cwlaljl@carib-link.net

Ms Gaynell Andrews

Planning Officer I

Agricultural Planning Division

Ministry of Food Production and Marine

Resources

St Clair Circle

St Clair

Tel: (868) 622-1221/1222/1223/1224

(868) 622-5953/7473

Fax: (868) 622-8762/4246

Email: agrilibc@tstt.net.tt

Mr Kent Villafana

Manager

Cocoa and Coffee Industry Board

27 Frederick Street

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 625-0289; 627-4172

Fax: (868) 627-4172

Email: ccib@tstt.net.tt

Mr Everard Byer

Chairman

Trinidad and Tobago Organic Agricultural

Movement

P.O. Box 1229

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 627-8217

Fax: (868) 623-0895

Email: ttoam@email.com

Mr Richard Aching

Technical Director

Trinidad and Tobago Organic Agricultural

Movement

P.O. Box 1229

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 627-8217

Fax: (868) 623-0895

Email: ttoam@email.com

Mr Vassel Stewart

Marketing and Quality Assurance Specialist

Caribbean Agricultural Research and

Development Institute

P.O. Box 212

University Campus

St Augustine

Tel: (868) 645-1205/1206/1207/8121

Fax: (868) 645-1208

Email: business@cardi.org

Mrs Joan Petersen

Organic Agronomist

Caribbean Agricultural Research and

Development Institute

P.O. Bag 212

University Campus

St Augustine

Tel: (868) 645-1205/1206/1207/8121

(868) 645-3573; 8120/1

Fax: (868) 645-1208

Email: ttunit@cardi.org

Ms Lynette Francis

Project Technician

Organic Systems Development

Caribbean Agricultural Research and

Development Institute

P.O. Bag 212

University Campus

St Augustine

Tel: (868) 645-1205/1206/1207/8121

(868) 645-3573; 8120/1

Fax: (868) 645-1208

Email: ttunit@cardi.org

Ms Shamela Rambadan

Graduate Assistant

Organic Systems Development

Caribbean Agricultural Research and

Development Institute (CARDI)

P.O. Bag 212

University Campus

St Augustine

Tel: (868) 645-1205/1206/1207/8121

(868) 645-3573; 8120/1

Fax: (868) 645-1208

Email: ttunit@cardi.org

Ms Veronica Simon

Executive Secretariat

Caribbean Agri-Business Association (CABA)

3 Herbert Street

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 628-4403

Fax: (868) 628-4562

Email: vsimon@iicacarc.org

Dr Musa Mohamed

Manager

Research and Development

Caroni (1975) Limited

Waterloo Road

Carapichaima

Tel: (868) 673-2730

Fax: (868) 673-0373

Email: research@tstt.net.tt

Mr Nigel A. Grimes

Sugarcane Agronomist

Research and Development

Caroni (1975) Limited

Waterloo Road

Carapichaima

Tel: (868) 673-0027/0028/0029

Fax: (868) 673-0037

Email: research@tstt.net.tt

Ms Bibi Ali

Biocontrol Scientist

Research and Development

Caroni (1975) Limited

Waterloo Road

Carapichaima

Tel: (868) 673-0027/0028/0029

Fax: (868) 673-0373

Email: bibiali@hotmail.com

Mr Samaroo Dowlath

Chief Executive Officer

National Agricultural Marketing and Development

Corporation

Southern Wholesale Market

S.S. Erin Road

Debe

Tel: (868) 647-3218/3467/3861

Fax: (868) 647-6087

Email: namdevco@tstt.net.tt

Mr Ganesh Gangapersad

Business Analyst

National Agricultural Marketing and Development

Corporation

Southern Whole Market

S.S. Erin Road

Debe

Tel: (868) 647-7576/3218/3467

Fax: (868) 647-6087

Email: namdevco@tstt.net.tt

Ms Leela Narinesingh

Promotions Officer

Tourism and Industrial Development Company of

Trinidad and Tobago

10-14 Phillips Street

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 623-6022 (Ext. 304)

Fax: (868) 625-9062

Email: lnarinesingh@tidco.co.tt

Mr Michael C. O'Donnell

Senior Multi-Sector Specialist

Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

P.O. Box 67

17 Alexandra Street

St Clair, Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 622-0873/8367/8800/5422

Fax: (868) 622-6047

Email: michael@iadb.org

Mr Paul Renier

Rural Development Counsellor

Delegation of the European Commission

Second Floor - The Mutual Centre

16 Queen's Park West

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 622-6628/0591

Fax: (868) 622-6355

Email: mailto@deltto.cec.eu.int

Ms Ayesha De Leon

Corporate Manager

Credit

Agricultural Development Bank of Trinidad and

Tobago

Head Office

87 Henry Street

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 623-6261/6262/6263/6264

Fax: (868) 624-3087

Email: adbpos@tstt.net.tt

Dr Majeed Mohammed

Senior Lecturer

Department of Food Production

Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Sciences

University of the West Indies (UWI)

St Augustine

Tel: (868) 645-3232/3233/3334 (Ext. 3324)

Fax: (868) 663-9686

Email: mohd2332@hotmail.com

Dr Laura Roberts-Nkrumah

Lecturer

Department of Food Production

Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Sciences

University of the West Indies (UWI)

St Augustine

Tel: (868) 645-3232/3233/3234 (Ext. 3325)

Fax: (868) 645-0479

Email: lbroberts_nkrumah@yahoo.com

Mr Lennox Andrews

Post-graduate Student

Department of Food Production

Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Sciences

University of the West Indies (UWI)

C/o 48 Dash Street

St Augustine

Tel: (868) 645-1533 (Home)

Fax: (868) 645-0479 (UWI)

Email: lpandrews@hotmail.com

Dr Reginald Griffith

Director of Research/International Consultant

Natural Resources Development Institute

P.O. Box 4763

Arima Post Office

Arima

Tel: (868) 668-8138

Fax: (868) 668-8138

Mr Ronald Austin

Affan's Bakery Limited

48 Irving Street

San Fernando

Tel: (868) 652-3610

Fax: (868) 652-3610

Mr Marcus Mycoo

Caribbean Manager

Marketing Arm International

P.O. Box 3509

Lot 167, Concord Rd

Bay View, La Romain

Tel: (868) 652-9565

(868) 683-2993 (Cellular)

Fax: (868) 657-7054

Email: mar@tstt.net.tt

Dr Donatus St Aimee

Economic Affairs Officer

Science and Technology

United Nations Economic Commission for Latin

America and the Caribbean

CHIC Building, 63 Park Street

P.O. Box 1113

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 623-5395 (Ext. 370)

Fax: (868) 623-8485

Email: dstaimee@eclacpos.org

Mr Brian Anthony Dickson

Agronomist

National Agro Chemicals Ltd

NP Compound, Cyrus Trace

El Socorro Ext.

San Juan

Tel: (868) 674-5711/5715/5716

Fax: (868) 638-3106

Email: brianadickson@hotmail.com

Dr Peter Vine

Soil Scientist/Agronomist

Accuracy Services

P.O. Box 960

Couva

Pager: (868) 662-3377 (Peter Vine)

Dr Thackwray Driver

Programme Coordinator

Programme Coordinating Unit

Agricultural Sector Reform Programme

#2 Serpentine Street

St Clair

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 628-1617/1618 (PBX)

(868) 623-3691 (Direct)

Fax: (868) 628-0383

Email: almrpcu1@tstt.net.tt

Mr Ramesh Sarabit

Senior Project Implementation Officer

Programme Coordinating Unit

Agricultural Sector Reform Programme

#2 Serpentine Street

St Clair

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 628-1617/1618 (PBX)

(868) 623-7634 (Direct)

Fax: (868) 628-0383

Email: abpcu@tstt.net.tt

Mr Ivan Churaman

President

Biodynamic Association of Trinidad and Tobago

St Augustine

Tel: (868) 672-5221

Email: churaman@carib-link.net

Mr Sharma Lalla

Managing Director

Innovative Technologies and Services Limited

50 Wittet Drive, Central Park

Couva

Tel: (868) 636-8011

Fax: (868) 679-3829

Email: lalla@tstt.net.tt

Mr Ivan Laughlin

Project Coordinator

Human Settlement Initiatives

2B Alexandra Street

St Clair

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 628-6682

Fax: (868) 628-4047

Email: ial@wow.net

Mr Aljoscha Wothke

Eco-Project Tobago

4 Breeze Hall Mall

Scarborough

Tobago

Mr Mark Frederick

Crop and Livestock Specialist

Caribbean Agriculture and Fisheries Programme

Office 11

1A Dere Street

Port-of-Spain

Tel: (868) 623-2708/2709

Fax: (868) 624-4903

Email: cariafp@tstt.net.tt

Central and South America

ARGENTINA

Mr Pipo Alberto Lernoud

World Board Member

IFOAM/MAPO

Salguero 925

Buenos Aires 1177

Tel: (54) 11 4862-1424

Fax: (54) 11 4777-5082

Email: pipol@sion.com

Ms Laura Montenegro

Director

ARGENCERT Srl

B. de Irigoyen 760 10eB

Buenos Aires 1072

Tel: (541) 14 3340313

Fax: (541) 14 3317185

Email: argencert@argencert.com.ar

BELIZE

Ms Bridget Cullerton

Chief Executive Officer

Belize Citrus Growers' Association

Mile 9, Stann Creek Valley Road

P.O. Box 7, Dangriga

Tel: (501) 5-23547/23585/23535

Fax: (501) 5-22686/23511

Email: cga@btl.net

bcullerton@belize.citrus.org

crei@btl.net

Mr John Usher

Technical Committee Chairman

Belize Citrus Growers' Association

Mile 9, Stann Creek Valley Road

P.O. Box 7, Dangriga

Tel: (501) 5-23547/23585/23535

Fax: (501) 5-22686/23511

Email: crei@btl.net

agdevser@btl.net

Mr Kenneth Gale

Assistant

Technical and Marketing

Agriculture Station

Ministry of Agriculture

Toledo District

Tel: (501) 7-12015/6

(501) 1-81349 (Cellular)

Fax: (501) 7-22681

Email: cardtol@htl.net

Mr Edwin Martinez

P.O. Box 448

Belmopan

Tel: (501) 8-20222

Email: ermjade@hotmail.com

CHILE

Ms Anouk Hoeberichts

Comunicación y Desarrollo

Grupo de Desarrollo Sostenible

Oficina Regional para América Latina y el Caribe

Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la

Agricultura y la Alimentación (FAO/UN)

Avenida Dag Hammarskjold, 3241, Vitacura

Casilla 10095

Santiago

Tel: (562) 337-2241/2100 (Ext. 2241)

Fax: (562) 337-2101

Email: anouk.hoeberichts@fao.org

COLOMBIA

Mr Ricardo Sanchez

Organic Agriculture Consultant

World Bank

Banco Mundial, Misión Residente en Colombia

Carrera 7 No. 71-21 Torre A Piso 16

Santafé de Bogotá

o

Tv. 12 No. 123-46, Apt. 505

Finca La Vega, Tuta, Boyaca

Santafé de Bogotá

Tel: (571) 214-2447; 326-3600

(573) 343-3597 (Cellular)

Fax: (578) 326-3480

Email: caminos_verdes@hotmail.com

COSTA RICA

Mr Pedro Cussianovich

Representative

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on

Agriculture

Coronado

San José, 6742-1000

Tel: (506) 216-0255

Fax: (506) 216-0258

Email: pcussian@iica.ac.cr

Mr Mario F. Castejón

Especialista en Comercialización

Centro de Inversiones

Proyecto PNUD RLA/00/04

Unidad Regional de Asistencia Técnica

Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la

Agricultura y la Alimentación (RUTA/FAO)

Apartado Postal 211-2100

San José

Tel. (506) 255-4011

Fax. (506) 222-6556

Email: mcastejon@ruta.org

Sr. Bernardo Jaén Hernández

Director Ejecutivo

Programa de Desarrollo Agroindustrial

(PROAGROIN)

Apartado Postal 84-5000

Liberia, Guanacaste

Tel: (506) 666-4535

Fax: (506) 666 4522

Email: prozona@sol.racsa.co.cr

Ms Faye Campos

Comercialización

Programa de Desarrollo Agroindustrial

(PROAGROIN)

Apartado Postal 84-5000

Liberia, Guanacaste

Tel: (506) 666-4535

Fax: (506) 666 4522

Email: prozona@sol.racsa.co.cr

Ing. Elizabeth Ramirez Sandi

Jefe Departamento

Servicio Fitosanitario del Estado

Ministerio de Agricultura y Ganadería

Barreal Heredia

San José

Tel: (506) 261-0381; 260-6190

Fax: (506) 261-0381; 260-6190

Email: eramirez@protecnet.go.cr

Website: www.protecnet.go.cr

GUATEMALA

Ing. Erick Jesús Granados Ortiz

Gerente Regional

Guatemaya Productos Ecológicos

13 Calle 20-48 “A” Zona 7

Kaminal Juyu II

Tel: (502) 472-3717

Fax: (502) 472-3713

Email: ecao@concyt.gob.gt

Ms Rogelia Soto Chacón

Oficial de Proyetcos

Oxfam 6B, Oficina Guatemala

6a Avenida 6-92 Zona 9

Tel: (502) 332-1992

Fax: (502) 331-2145

Email: rsoto@oxfam.org.gt

Mr Mario Alejandro Arriola Polanco

Administrador

Oxfam, Gran Bretaña

6a Avenida 6-92 Zona 9

Guatemala City

Tel: (502) 332-1992

Fax: (502) 331-2145

Email: marriola@oxfam.org.gt

marriola@excite.com

Lic. Guillermo Cifuentes

Director Regional

Regional Sede de Occidente

5a Calle D3-48 Zona 1

Quetzaltenango

Tel: (502) 761-9596/2026

Fax: (502) 761-9596

Email: ecaoxela@concyt.gob.gt

ECUADOR

Ms Verónica Vallejo Michelena

Sales Manager

EXPOAROM

Av. Simón Bolívar e Interoceánica Km 4½

P.O. Box 17-21-859

Quito

Tel: (593) 2 289-8385/888-740

Fax: (593) 2 289-8385/888-740

Email: expoarom@andinanet.net

Ms Maria Gabriela Solines Alencastro

EXPOAROM

Av. Simón Bolívar e Interoceánica Km 4½

P.O. Box 17-21-859

Quito

Tel: (593) 2 289-8385/888-740

Fax: (593) 2 289-8385/888-740

Email: expoarom@andinanet.net

EL SALVADOR

Sr. Franklin Januario García Rodríguez

Fitopatólogo

Centro Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria y

Forestal (CENTA)

Caja 14 Avenida Nte #2-11 Sto.teck

Km 33.5 Carretera a Santa Ana,

Depto. La Libertad

San Salvador

Tel: (503) 338-4842

Email: fitopat_jan@hotmail.com

HONDURAS

Ing. Jose Lisandro Mejia del Cid

Subdirector Técnico Proyecto

Proyecto de Desarrollo Rural en el Sur Occidente

de Honduras (PROSOC)

Secretaría de Agricultura y

Colonia Mellar Castro Márcala

La Paz

Tel: (504) 764-5357/5182

Fax: lismejia@hotmail.com

NICARAGUA

Ms Flor de Maria Rivas Lopez

Gerente de Proyectos

Agriculture and Food Security Project

SERCONSA

Cooperative League of the United States of

America (CLUSA)

Carretera Sur KM 11¼

Managua

Tel: (505) 265-7123; 278-0451

Fax: (505) 265-7335

Email: clusanft@ibw.com.ni

Mr Mario José Machado Amador

Gerente de Crédito

Agriculture and Food Security Project

SERCONSA

Cooperative League of the United States of

America (CLUSA)

Carretera Sur KM 11¼

Managua

Tel: (505) 265-7123

Fax: (505) 265-7335

Email: clusanft@ibw.com.ni

zam94537@hotmail.lcom

Mr Armando Jose Angulo Campos

Gerente Producción Agrícola

Agriculture and Food Security Project

SERCONSA

Cooperative League of the United States of

America (CLUSA)

Rpto. San Juan #498

Managua

Tel: (505) 278-0451

Fax: (505) 278-0451

Email: clusanft@ibw.com.ni

Mr Arnulfo Rayo Rodríguez

Gerente Producción Agrícola

Agriculture and Food Security Project

SERCONSA

Cooperative League of the United States of

America (CLUSA)

Rpto. San Juan #498

Tel: (505) 278-0451

Fax: (505) 278-0451

Email: arayorodriguez@hotmail.com

clusanft@ibw.com.ni

Mr Oscar Danilo Cuevas Garibo

Production Technician

Cooperative League of the United States of

America (CLUSA)

Km 11¼ Carretera Sur

Managua

Tel: (505) 265-7123

Fax: (505) 265 7335

Email: proclusa@ibw.com.ni

agroclusa@ibw.com.ni

Mr Jaime Carlos Terán Reyes

Agribusiness Technician

Cooperative League of the United States of

America (CLUSA)

Km 11¼ Carretera Sur

Managua

Tel: (505) 265-7123

Fax: (505) 265 7335

Email: admclusa@ibw.com.ni

agroclusa@ibw.com.ni

PERU

Mr Gonzalo La Cruz

Irrigation Programme Manager

ITDG

Casilla 18-0620

Lima 18

Tel: (511) 242-9714

Fax: (511) 446-6621

Email: gonzalo@itdg.org.pe

EUROPE

BELGIUM

Mrs Henriette Acquah Dodet Malenge

Co-ordinator - Fruit & Vegetable Sector

Centre for the Development of Enterprise (CDE)

Av. Herrmann Debroux 52

1160 Brussels

Tel: (322) 679-1811 (10 lines 9-18hrs)

Fax: (322) 675-2603/679-1831

Email: ado@cde.int

Website: www.cde.int

FRANCE

Mr Thierry Lescot

Especialista en Agronomia

Programa Banana, Plátano y Piña

Departmento de Producciones Frutales

Centre de Coopération Internationale en

Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement

(CIRAD-FLHOR)

TA 50/P54, Avenue Agropolis

Blvd. de la Lironde, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5

Tel: +33(0) 4 67 61 71 52

Fax: +33(0) 4 67 61 71 47

Email: thierry.lescot@cirad.fr

GERMANY

Mr Heribert Schramm

Managing Director

Naturkost Schramm GmbH

Ludwig-Winter-Strasse 6

D-77767 Appenweier

Tel: +49(0) 7805-96680

Fax: +49(0) 7805-966880

Email: team@naturkost-schramm.de

hs@naturkost-schramm.de

Website: www.naturkost-schramm.de

ITALY

Mr Paul P. Pilkauskas

Senior Commodity Specialist

Raw Materials, Tropical and Horticultural

Products Service

Commodities and Trade Division

Economic and Social Department

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United

Nations (FAO)

Room D-864

Viale delle Terme di Caracalla

00100 Rome

Tel: (39) 06 570-52003

Fax: (39) 06 570-54495

Email: Paul.Pilkauskas@fao.org

Mr Pascal Liu

Commodity Specialist

Raw Materials, Tropical and Horticultural

Products Service

Commodities and Trade Division

Economic and Social Department

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United

Nations (FAO)

Room D-848

Viale delle Terme di Caracalla

00100 Rome

Tel: (39) 06 570-55957

Fax: (39) 06 570-54495

Email: Pascal.Liu@fao.org

Mr Bart Vrolijk

Agricultural Trade Specialist

Raw Materials, Tropical and Horticultural

Products Service

Commodities and Trade Division

Economic and Social Department

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United

Nations (FAO)

Room D-855b

Viale delle Terme di Caracalla

00100 Rome

Tel: (39) 06 570-53663

Fax: (39) 06 570-54495

Email: Bart.Vrolijk@fao.org

Ms Nadia Scialabba

Environment Officer

Environment and Natural Resources Service

Sustainable Development Department

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United

Nations (FAO)

Via delle Terme di Caracalla

00100 Rome

Tel: (39) 06 570-56729

Fax: (39) 06 570-53369

Email: nadia.scialabba@fao.org

NETHERLANDS

Ms Isolina Boto

Deputy Head

Seminars and Studies Department

Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural

Cooperation (CTA)

P.O. Box 380, 6700 AJ Wageningen

Tel: (31) 317 467134

Fax: (31) 317 460067

Email: boto@cta.nl

Website: www.agricta.org

Mr Ben Huyghe

Quality Manager

AgroFair B.V.

Koopliedenweg 10

2991 LN Barendrecht

Tel: +31(0) 180 643904

+31(0) 6 21256279 (Cellular Netherlands)

+32(0) 4 77387838 (Cellular Belgium)

Fax: +31(0) 180 649424

Email: ben.huyghe@agrofair.nl

Website: www.agrofair.com

Mr Bas Schneiders

Director

Weleda AG

1076 JV Amsterdam

Tel: (31) 20 6716513

Email: bschneiders@weleda.de

Mr Bo Van Elzakker

Director

Agro Eco/IOAS

P.O. Box 63

6700 AB Bennekom

Tel: (31) 318.420.405

Fax: (31) 318 414.820

Email: b.vanelzakker@agroeco.nl

SWEDEN

Mr Gunnar Rundgren

President, IFOAM and

Chief Executive Officer, Grolink

Torfolk, 684 95 Höje

Tel: (46) 563-72345

Fax: (46) 563-72066

Email: gunnar@grolink.se

Website: www.grolink.se

SWITZERLAND

Mr Rudy Kortbech-Olesen

Senior Market Development Adviser

International Trade Centre (ITC)

Palais des Nations

CH-1202 Geneva 10

Tel: (41) 22 7300253

Fax: (41) 22 7300446

Email: kortbech@intracen.org

UNITED KINGDOM

Mr Robert Taylor

Content Manager, Animal Sciences

CABI Publishing

CAB International

Nosworthy Way

Wallingford

Oxon OX10 8DE

Tel: +44 (01) 1491 829450

+44 (01) 1491 832111 (PBX)

Fax: +44 (01) 1491 833508

Email: R.Taylor@cabi.org

Mr James Waller

CAB International

Nosworthy Way

Wallingford

Oxon OX10 8DE

Tel: +44 (01) 1491 829450

+44 (01) 1491 832111 (PBX)

Fax: +44 (01) 1491 833508

Email: J.Waller@cabi.org

Mr Dave Moore

CAB International

Bakeham Lane

Egham, Surrey TW209TY

Tel: +44 1784 470111

Fax: +44 1491 829100

Email: D.Moore@cabi.org

NORTH AMERICA

CANADA

Ms Kristina Taboulchanas

Research Associate

International Development Research Centre

250 Albert Street, Office #1105

Ottawa, Ontario K1G-3H9

Tel: (613) 236-6163 (Ext. 2176)

Fax: (613) 567-7749

Email: ktaboulchanas@idrc.ca

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr James A. Riddle

Policy Analyst/Certification Specialist

Organic Independents

Rt. 3 Box. 162-C

Winoma, Minnesota 55987

Tel: (507) 454-8310

(507) 429-7959 (Cellular)

Fax: (507) 454-8310

Email: jriddle@luminet.net

Mr Daniele P. Giovannucci

Senior Consultant (World Bank)

1006 South 9th Street

Philadelphia, PA 19147-4798

Tel: (215) 922-7518

Fax: (215) 922-5723

Email: Dpg@consultant.com

Dgiovannucci@worldbank.org

Mr Rick Morris

Owner

The Compost Farm

7912 Nolensville Road

Arrington, Tennessee 37014

Tel: (615) 395-7176

Email: compostf@bellsouth.net

compostfarm@hotmail.com

Dr Carlton G. Davis

Distinguished Professor

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

Food and Resource Economics Department

University of Florida

McCarty Hall

P.O. Box 110240

Gainesville, Florida 32611-0240

Tel: (352) 392-1881 (Ext. 313)

Fax: (352) 392-9898

Email: cgdavis@mail.ifas.ufl.edu

Mr Kevin Athearn

Phd. Student

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

Food and Resource Economics Department

University of Florida

G105 McCarty Hall B

P.O. Box 110240

Gainesville, Florida 32611-0240

Tel: (352) 376-8730

Fax: (352) 392-9898

Email: athearn@ufl.edu

Mr Timothy Larsen

ITC Consultant

1313 Lombardi Street

Erie, Colorado, 80516

Tel: (303) 828-7637

Fax: (303) 828-4912

Email: tjlarsen2001@earthlink.net

Ms Katalina Montana

Supply Reduction Specialist

Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission

(CICAD)

Organization of American States

1889 F. Street, N.W.

Washington D.C. 20006

Tel: (202) 458-3479

Fax: (202) 458-3658

Email: KMontana@oas.org

CONFERENCE SUPPORT PERSONNEL

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Trinidad and Tobago

• Ms Marion Alleyne, Conference Coordinator

• Ms Lisa Martinez, Conference Coordinator

• Ms Roanne Joseph, Secretariat Coordinator/Liaison

• Mr Harold Seeyjagat, Equipment Technologist

• Ms Sherry Holder, Secretary

Ministry of Food Production and Marine Resources, Trinidad and Tobago

• Mrs Joy Persad-Myers, Secretariat Coordinator/Liaison

• Mr Francis Watty

• Ms Angela Betrand

• Ms Jane Fournillier

• Ms Nicole Guerra, Computer Technician

• Ms Sumatee Sookhoo

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture, Trinidad and Tobago

• Ms Lavorn Haynes, Secretary

• Mr Ricky Franco, Equipment Technologist

Rapporteurs

• Ms Elizabeth McClean

• Ms Jermaine Walker

• Ms Shanna Prevost

• Ms Denyse Johnston

Interpreters

National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (School of Languages), Trinidad and Tobago

Ms Milsa Barrow

Ms Michelle Scobie

Ms Lyndell Logan-Salina

Mrs Janett Subieta-Phelps

1 IFOAM has agreed to convene a meeting in the Caribbean to discuss regional standards. The development of these regional standards will facilitate the trade of organic produce within the region.

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