Manual Boat Hauling Devices in The Maldives-BOBP/WP/71

WORKING PAPERS - BOBP/WP/71

Manual Boat Hauling Devices in The Maldives



Executing Agency: FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS

Bay of Bengal Programme Madras, India, 1992

Table of Contents


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© FAO 2004

PREFACE

The Republic of Maldives, where fishing is a major industry, has a fleet of about 5500 traditional fishing craft. Most of them are in the 8-15 m range in length. As these craft, built with local and imported timber, are not coated with antifouling paints or sheathed to protect the timber, they are hauled on to the beach at least once a month for scraping of the hull and application of protective oil. Traditionally, the boats are hauled on to the beach by 50-80 men and women pulling the ends of a rope attached to the stern and the sides of the boat.

With labour becoming scarce in the atolls because of migration to tourist resort islands in search of more remunerative work, the Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture of the Maldives (MOFA) requested the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP) to develop simple low-cost manual hauling devices which would help to reduce the hauling crew. This paper documents the devices developed and the favourable reactions of the local fisherfolk.

This paper is the result of contributions made by MOFA staff, BOBP staff, Varuna Construction and Design Company, Madras, and all those who regularly hauled the boats on to the beach during trials in Madras, and the fisherfolk of the Maldives, both men and women, who participated in the trials.


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


WORKING PAPERS - BOBP/WP/71pdf

1. INTRODUCTION
2. ALTERNATIVE HAULING DEVICES

2.1 Rope-tackle
2.2 Chain hoist
2.3 Multipurpose lifting and pulling gear
2.4 Crab winch
2.5 Manual winches and capstans
2.6 Engine-driven winch

3. THE NEED FOR HAULING DEVICES
4. CONSTRUCTION AND TESTING OF CAPSTANS AND WINCH IN MADRAS
5. DEMONSTRATION OF HAULING IN THE MALDIVES

5.1 Steel winch
5.2 Wooden capstan/winch
5.3 Rope-tackle
5.4 Rails and rollers
5.5 Rope and cable
5.6 Anchor
5.7 Earnings

6. GOVERNMENT INTRODUCTION SCHEME
7. CONCLUSIONS

MAPS AND FIGURES

1. Map of the Maldives
2. Hauling boat ashore manually
3. Rope-tackle
4. Chain hoist
5. Multipurpose lifting and pulling gear
6. Crab winch
7. Manual winch
8. Capstan
9. Engine-driven winch
10. Wooden capstan
11. Steel winch
12. Hauling accessories

APPENDICES

1. Sequence of events
2. The Dhivehi Instruction folder

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