Cage Nursery Rearing of Shrimp and Prawn Fry in Bangladesh - BOBP/WP/92

WORKING PAPERS - BOBP/WP/92

Cage Nursery Rearing of Shrimp and Prawn Fry in Bangladesh

by
Charles L. Angell
Sr. Aquaculturist


Executing Agency: FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS

Bay of Bengal Programme Madras, India, 1994

Table of Contents


The designations employed and the presentation of material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

All rights reserved. Reproduction and dissemination of material in this information product for educational or other non-commercial purposes are authorized without any prior written permission from the copyright holders provided the source is fully acknowledged. Reproduction of material in this information product for resale or other commercial purposes is prohibited without written permission of the copyright holders. Applications for such permission should be addressed to the Chief, Publishing and Multimedia Service, Information Division, FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00100 Rome, Italy or by email to copyright@fao.org

© FAO 2004

PREFACE

The shrimp culture industry of Bangladesh depends on catches of the wild fry of tiger shrimp.
Employment as fry-catchers has been generated for thousands of rural poor. But the marketing system is not well developed and high fry mortality occurs due to poor handling. The growing freshwater prawn farming sector, however, continues to demand increasing quantities of large juveniles.

This report, based on field trials from 1990 to 1993, describes the results of cage nurseryculture trials with both tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) and giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) fry. It was thought that fry-catchers would be able to increase their earnings through sales of nursed post-larvae and juveniles. The survival of nursed post-larvae in the distribution system would also be increased. However, it is unlikely that tiger shrimp fry nursing can be made profitable. On the other hand, cage culture of a combination of hatchery-reared post-larvae and wild-caught fry of the freshwater prawn would be profitable.

An NGO played an important role in the subproject by implementing technical trials and organizing and supporting participating fisherfolk groups.


TABLE OF CONTENTS


WORKING PAPERS - BOBP/WP/92pdf

1. INTRODUCTION
2. SHRIMP SEED-COLLECTORS
3. TECHNOLOGICAL ALTERNATIVES
4. PARTICIPATORY FIELD TRIALS
5. CAGE NURSERY CULTURE

5.1 Tiger shrimp fry nursing
5.2 Freshwater prawn fry nursing

6. MARKETING
7. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

7.1 Tiger shrimp nursing
7.2 Freshwater prawn nursing

8. CONCLUSIONS

8.1 Technical aspects
8.2 Social aspects
8.3 Financial viability

9. LITERATURE CITED

PUBLICATIONS OF THE BAY OF BENGAL PROGRAMME