Biosocioeconomics of Fishing for Small Pelagics along The Southwest Coast of Sri Lanka - BOBP/WP/96

WORKING PAPERS - BOBP/WP/96

Biosocioeconomics of Fishing for Small Pelagics
along The Southwest Coast of Sri Lanka

by
P. Dayaratne & K. P. Sivakumaran
National Aquatic Resources Agency,
Colombo, Sri Lanka


Executing Agency: FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS

Bay of Bengal Programme Madras, India, 1994

Table of Contents


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PREFACE

The marine fishery in Sri Lanka is the country’s major source of animal protein supply (60%). It also provides employment to around 100,000 fishermen. More than 90 per cent of the fish production comes from the coastal area extending up to about 25 nautical miles from the shore. A group of small pelagic species constitutes more than 45 per cent of this catch.

Before the motorization of fishing craft in the early 1950s, almost the entire production of small pelagics came from the beach seine (BS). After motorization, however, small-mesh gillnets (GN) became popular. With the introduction of synthetic material, the gillnet became the major gear. In the early 1980s, fishermen on the southwest coast of Sri Lanka started using the purse seine (PS) to target small pelagic resources.

The rapid increase in fishing intensity due to motorization gave rise to several fishing disputes. The use of the more efficient purse seine in the southwestern coastal waters led to several conflicts. In 1987, the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (MFAR) framed regulations limiting the area of operation of the PS. However, enforcement of these regulations was not successful. The MFAR thereupon, realized the need to examine the possible interaction between the different fisheries in terms of resources and income distribution among various user-groups. It was expected that the information obtained through a study would assist in arriving at sound management measures. The study was undertaken by the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources and the National Aquatic Resources Agency (NARA) with guidance from the Bay of Bengal Programme’s biosocioeconomics team. The reporting was funded by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


WORKING PAPERS - BOBP/WP/96pdf

1. INTRODUCTION
2. THE OBJECTIVES
3. METHODOLOGIES

3.1 Preparatory work
3.2 Bioeconomic sampling
3.3 Data analysis
3.4 Socioeconomic survey
3.5 Linkage of bioeconomic and socioeconomic components

4. FINDINGS

4.1 Bioeconomics of interactive fishing for small pelagics
4.2 Socioeconomics of interactive fishing for small pelagics

5. DISCUSSIONS
6. RECOMMENDATIONS
7. REFERENCES

APPENDICESpdf

I. Number of villages, households and population in each Fisheries Inspector’s (Fl) Division surveyed
II. Distribution of sample households and population in each Fisheries Inspector’s (FI) Division surveyed
III. Distribution of households by family size
IV. Age and sex distribution of the population surveyed in the study area
V. Number of households surveyed by economic activities
VI. Distribution of fishing households by ownership
VII. Distribution of person involved in various activities
VIII. Distribution of households owning various craft-gear combinations in the study area
IX. Fishing gear and craft combinations of different fisheries in the study area
X. The gear distribution in the study area
XI. Distribution of craft in the study/extended study area
XII. Average income and expenditure per month per craft
XIII a-f. Income and expenditure by fishery, craft and gear

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