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Presentations


Development of an animal identification and movement control (traceability) system for the APHCA countries

(Presented by Hans Wagner, Senior Animal Production and Health Officer, FAO/RAP)

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Pro-poor livestock policy facility (PPLPF)

(Presented by Hans Wagner, Senior Animal Production and Health Officer, FAO/RAP)

1. Proposed project title

Southeast Asia Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Hub (Phase I, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand, and Viet Nam)

2. Project rationale and purpose

The overall aim of the proposed project is to contribute to poverty alleviation in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Viet Nam through equitable, safe and clean livestock farming, the focus being on facilitation of policy formulation rather than technical intervention. The project will create awareness among policy makers and development agencies of the potential of livestock as a means for poverty reduction and national economic development and help to identify specific policies that contribute to the achievement of the above aim while considering issues associated with the predicted growth in livestock numbers and increasing consumer concerns with food quality. The project will emphasize the design and implementation of policies that allow poor livestock keepers to access the expanding markets for livestock products and facilitate the development of strategies that reduce poor livestock keepers’ vulnerability.

3. Project context

The project will complement on-going FAO projects on livestock production in the region as it focuses on policy formulation with the objective to improve market access for poor livestock keepers and to reduce their vulnerability. Furthermore it will be relevant for the FAO’s Special Programmes for Food Security in the four countries included in the project as it will contribute to the sustainable increase in agricultural production and the diversification of farm income through livestock.

Cambodia, Lao PDR and Vietnam have identified the livestock sector as a potential entry point to rural poverty reduction in their PRSPs but are so far lacking concrete strategies for improvement. The project therefore has a strong potential to help the governments of these countries to identify strategies that capture the potentials of their livestock sectors as regards poverty reduction to its greatest possible extent.

4. Project objectives

The objective of this project is the formulation, adoption and implementation of policies at local, national and regional level that promote equitable (distributionally fair), safe (public health risks managed) and clean (environmentally sound and sustainable) livestock farming.

5. Expected outputs

In year one the project will carry out situation assessments and analyses and the following outputs will be achieved:

Years 2 and 3 will concentrate on capacity building and awareness raising and achieve the following outputs:

6. Project activities

To achieve its objective, the project will pursue a set of activities that will encourage and facilitate conceptual shifts in policy objectives that (i) create and strengthen the capacity of the poor to act for themselves, (ii) engage the poor as partners sharing rights and responsibilities, (iii) create incentives for the poor to mobilize resources, (iv) help catalyze the formation of people’s organization, and (v) protect the assets of the poor to reduce their vulnerability. The focus will be on the formulation and promotion of policy and institutional reforms that reduce existing financial, technical, and social and cultural barriers, that increase competitiveness, and that reduce risks and vulnerability. Specifically, the project will encourage activities that bring together the stakeholders across the region to discuss and resolve issues that impede cooperation and pro-poor policy making. This will facilitate creation of appropriate policy environments to foster a long-term process of informed policy making including the development of market mechanisms in the sector.

7. Reason for implementation by FAO

FAO, being an intergovernmental organization providing for international debate and having a normative mandate is the suggested executing agency for the project. Physically the project will be located in and managed from the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific in Bangkok, whilst its administration will fall under the responsibilities of the Livestock Information and Policy Branch of the Animal Production and Health Division (AGAL) at FAO headquarters in Rome.

While the project will benefit from the backstopping and guidance provided by the FAO HQ, the FAO will benefit from a reality check of its normative values and an improvement in data quality, resolution and relevance.

The project has strong linkages with FAO’s Strategic Framework as it is aimed at reducing food insecurity and rural poverty - with a focus on poor livestock farmers - and at improving their livelihoods and access to resources (A, A1), furthermore it will promote enabling policies through international instruments and national policies that respond to domestic requirements of poor livestock farmers (B, B1, B2) and finally aims at a sustainable increase in the supply of livestock products through policy options and institutional measures that improve efficiency and adaptability in livestock production, processing and marketing systems (C, C1).

8. Inputs through FAO

The planned overall project duration is 3 years. The proposed project will be closely linked to the recently established Pro-poor livestock policy facility at FAO headquarters (http://www.fao.org/ag/againfo/projects/en/pplpi/home.html). The latter will provide technical support (backup of policy analysis capacity, development of decision support tools, support of information exchange) and link regional policy concerns to global when required. Furthermore, the headquarters facility is prepared to contribute funds towards covering the personnel costs incurred by the regional project.

9. Budget estimate

Total inputs and budget are itemized in the table below.

Item

Total budget (USD)

Contracts
(data collection, analysis, information dissemination, etc.)

750 000

Training/Capacity building, Meetings, Workshop, Travel

690 000

Staff
(1 International Professional, 2 National Professional Support Staff, 1 Office Support Staff)

660 000

General Operating Expenses

150 000

Miscellaneous

150 000

Overheads (12%)

288 000

Total

2 688 000

10. Status/origin of the project proposal in beneficiary country

The project proposal has been developed on the basis of stakeholder consultations which have taken place during workshops organized in Southeast Asia in February 2001 and November 2002.

11. Technical units/officers involved

(i) the proposal is being submitted by Joachim Otte, Coordinator PPLPF, AGAL

(ii) other Technical Units involved will be AGAP, AGAH, ESC, ESA and RAP

Livestock waste management in East Asia GEF-PDF-B Concept for pipeline entry (China - Thailand - Viet Nam)

(Presented by Hans Wagner, Senior Animal Production and Health Officer, FAO/RAP)

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First Report on the State of the World’s Farm Animal Genetic Resources update August 2003

(Presented by Hans Wagner, Senior Animal Production and Health Officer, FAO/RAP)

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Regional approaches to livestock disease control in the Greater Mekong Subregion ADB concept note

(Presented by Subhash Morzaria, FAO/RAP)

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Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and FAO’s involvement

(Presented by Subhash Morzaria, FAO/RAP)

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APHCA activities in areas of WTO’s Sanitary Phyto-Sanitary (SPS) Agreement, Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety*

(Presented by Vishnu Songkitti, Technical Assistant, FAO/RAP)

* In line with the FAO RAP activities 213A6 004 - National, regional and global prevention and control of Zoonoses and food-borne diseases. (FAO assistance on Food Safety issues has been increasingly requested by Asia-Pacific countries/governments, in particular in the context of WTO’s SPS Agreement).

WTO’s SPS agreement

The first APHCA activity on WTO’s SPS Agreement started in November 2000. The Joint FAO-APHCA/OIE Workshop on WTO’s SPS Agreement was organized in Dhaka, Bangladesh along with the 24th APHCA Session. This workshop was attended by APHCA delegates (administrative level).

During 2001 - 2003, APHCA jointly organized three regional workshops on WTO’s SPS agreement in Chiang Mai, Thailand and 73 government officials (technical level) from APHCA member countries participated.

Veterinary public health and food safety

In 2001, the first FAO-APHCA/OIE hands-on workshop on BSE diagnosis and surveillance was organized in Bangkok, Thailand. Ten government officials (technical staff) from pre-selected APHCA countries were trained (+ ten local observers).

APHCA-AGA Regional workshop on feed and food safety was organized along with the 26th APHCA Session in Subang Jaya, Malaysia, in August 2002.

The second hands-on workshop on BSE diagnosis and surveillance will be organized jointly by FAO-APHCA, OIE and Department of Livestock Development (DLD) of Thailand in Bangkok, between 6 and 8 October 2003. Ten participants from five pre-selected APHCA member countries will be invited. (The other APHCA countries may be invited to the next workshop in 2004/5 if the similar workshop is required/proposal made at the 27th APHCA Session.)

The joint OIE/FAO-APHCA workshop on BSE risk analysis will be organized in Chiang Mai, Thailand, between 9 and 11 October 2003. CVOs from 20 Asia-Pacific countries (all APHCA countries will be invited).

The OIE/FAO-APHCA/DLD consultation meeting on BSE public awareness will be organized back-to-back with the BSE risk analysis workshop in Chiang Mai, Thailand between 13-14 October 2003. Selected CVOs will be invited to stay on for the meeting.

FAO-APHCA has collaborated (since 1997) with the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chiang Mai University (FVM-CMU) and the Free University of Berlin (FUB), Germany in the context of training on veterinary public health and food safety. Technical officials from selected APHCA countries in the Southeast Asian subregion have been invited and participated in four training courses (on Serological diagnosis of important Zoonoses: March 1997, January - February 1999, October - November 1999; and food microbiology & hygiene: November - December 1999).

A new regional Veterinary Public Health (VPH) center will be established at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Thailand with full technical assistance from the FUB and the Institute of Meat Hygiene, Meat Technology and Food Hygiene, University for Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria (UVMV). The center will serve APHCA member countries starting from those in Southeast Asian subregion and will further cover the whole APHCA region. The center’s joint activities with APHCA will be as the follows:

- Master of Science Degree Programme in Veterinary Public Health (MSc-VPH) for countries in the Southeast Asian (SEA) subregion. This course will be implemented as a joint degree (“Dual Award”) programme between the FVM-CMU and FUB. For the first batch, twelve scholarships are made available by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and Chiang Mai University, Ministry of University Affairs, Thailand. APHCA members in Southeast Asia are given high priority for the scholarships. Two more batches of students will be received in academic years 2004 and 2005 with possible scholarships for candidates from other countries in the APHCA region.

- FAO-APHCA will collaborate with OIE-Tokyo office and the VPH center in organizing training courses and workshops on subjects related to veterinary public health and food safety.

Food and Feed Safety Note

(Presented by Carolyn C. Benigno, Animal Health Officer, FAO/RAP)

The food and feed safety issue was extensively discussed in a workshop conducted during the 26th APHCA Session. The workshop acknowledged the intensification of livestock production and the increasing demand for raw materials needed by the feed industry. Countries in the region see an influx of feed ingredients from sources where quality is guaranteed often only on paper. The lack of expertise on risk management, knowledge of international standards and the lack of capacity to meet such standards have placed the region at a disadvantage in terms of exporting its products. There is, for instance, a lack of capacity in the testing against contaminants in food and feed. Facilities and capacity to detect dioxin, beta agonists, drug residues, mycotoxins and other bacterial, viral and chemical contaminants in feeds are present in only a few countries in the region.

Thus, following the workshop and given the recommendations (Annex 1) passed therein, the following roadmap of activities is suggested to be conducted by member countries for the Commission to come up with a clear food and feed safety program for the region that is at par with current practices.

As a start the attached questionnaire (Annex 2) will determine the status of the food and feed safety programs in the respective countries. Common problems and issues would be lumped together for possible discussion of solutions. Then possible areas of regional cooperation would be looked into.

Annex 1 Recommendations on the workshop on food and feed safety

1. Countries to review existing food safety and quality legislation so as to ensure that it provides an adequate basis for the control of feed related hazards with the potential to cause public health risks.

2. Countries to participate to the fullest extent possible in the work being undertaken by international organizations involved in developing standards, guidelines and recommendations relating to feed borne hazards.

3. Continued research is needed into the public health implications of animal feeds to support risk analysis of feed borne hazards.

4. Suitable analytical and diagnostic methods should be developed for rapid screening and confirmation of feed borne hazards in national surveillance and monitoring programmes as well as in routine regulatory testing.

5. Mechanisms to be established to ensure multi-disciplinary scientific input.

6. Dialogue among producers of feed or feed ingredients, livestock and aquaculture industries and government should be encouraged as an essential part of the process of elaborating codes of practice for the feed industry.

7. Coordination and cooperation among several government agencies and departments may be necessary to ensure successful and efficient implementation of feed control programmes

8. International organizations should continue to develop and make available information related to animal feed safety to their member countries thus supporting national feed control programmes.

9. National/regional projects should be undertaken on capacity building for surveillance and prevention of BSE and other Zoonoses.

Annex 2 Questionnaires on food and feed safety:

Country:
Name:
Position:
Office:
E-mail address:

1. Do you have a food safety legislation? What is it about?

2. Do you have a feed safety legislation? What is it about?

3. Do you take a periodic review of your food/feed legislation to ensure that both legislations are coherent and complementary?

4. What agency handles feed regulation? Food regulation? If two separate agencies handle each, how is coordination achieved?

5. Do you have a significant feed industry (to include antibiotic, mineral and vitamin premixes and other injectables)? Describe the industry (number of establishments, players involved, etc.)

6. Do you participate in works undertaken by international organizations? Do you send representatives? If not, why?

7. Do you have access to research on public health implications of animal feeds?

8. Do you do research on public health implications of animal feeds to support risk analysis? Are you into risk analysis?

9. Do you have the capacity to rapidly screen and confirm feedborne hazards?

10. Is there an organized private sector engaged in the feed industry? How is coordination with them achieved?

11. If there is no organized feed sector, do you have plans to organize them? How will you go about it?

12. Do you have a surveillance and prevention system for BSE and other zoonoses? If yes, what other areas of assistance are needed to improve on it?

13. What are the constraints you encounter in achieving an effective food and feed safety programme?


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