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IMPROVING POLICY AND PLANNING BY INCORPORATING HRM PERSPECTIVES


Incorporating a household resource management perspective in agricultural policies and planning faces several challenges.

THREE HRM RELATED CHALLENGES

1

FAO/G. Bizarri

While agricultural specialists might recognize the importance of considering an HRM perspective in planning programmes, projects and services, they may lack the data, approaches and tools to help them do so in their work with communities.

2

Policies are often developed without rigorous consideration of their impacts on different members within households. It is commonly assumed that a policy benefiting one household member will benefit all members (e.g. policies that increase wages for males). Yet, these "gender-blind" policies often have differential impacts. For example, if a male head of household holds land title in his name, he will likely have easier access to credit and agricultural inputs than the women in the same household. They will have differential access to the land and control over its use.

FAO/A. Conti

3

FAO/A. Conti

In areas with a high incidence of chronic diseases such as HIV/AIDS, priority must be given to addressing household resource management and rural development in this context.

Understanding the impacts on household livelihoods is critical to developing effective mitigating strategies. This means examining and responding to changes in household composition; division of labour and responsibilities; knowledge and transmission of knowledge; power and decision-making dynamics within households (e.g. resource control and access); legal matters relevant to household resource management (e.g. inheritance laws, asset-stripping), etc.


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