Non-Wood News 12

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SPECIAL FEATURES (Pdf )

• A Global Alliance on Non-Wood Forest Products
• Microcredit/microfinance
• Productos forestales no madereros en América Latina y sus perspectivas al 2020

NEWS AND NOTES (Pdf )

• Amazon fibres

    • Vegetable plastic
    • Natural fibres for cars
    • Ecovogt, textile based on Amazonia plants

• Are ramp festivals sustainable?
• Bees

    • Forest makes coffee farm richer
    • Taking the sting out of beekeeping in South Africa
    • Bee Foundation to sign deal
    • Zambian honey gets German fair trade certificate
    • Beekeeping centre opened in Armenia
    • Uganda gets ready to export honey

• Bioprospecting or biopiracy? - Making bioprospecting a
sustainable endeavour

    • Samoa to profit from indigenous knowledge deal
    • Indigenous knowledge and rights must be protected
    • Katemfe (Thaumatococcus danielli): sweet prospects turn sour
    • Biopiracy Web site
    • Malaysian state acts to thwart biopirates
    • Biopiracy of indigenous African knowledge
    • UK wildlife must not be patented for profit

• Birch bark extract – a value added boreal product
• Bugging sandalwood trees
• Butterfly farming
• Certification: community management for multiple uses
• Certification problems and guidelines for botanical and fauna non-wood forest products
• Congo Basin Forest Partnership
• Cupuaçu chocolate
• Domestication of non-wood forest products: the transition from
common property resource to crop
• Forests and health

    • Traditional medicines have “real benefits”
    • Jungle medicine has already cured 800 diseases
    • Sustaining the supply of traditional medicines (DFID Forestry Research Programme R8305)
    • Forests, safety nets for HIV/AIDSaffected households
    • Traditional medicines “must be registered and studied”
    • Support for traditional medicine from African states
    • Traditional medicine action plan in Kenya
    • Centre of forestry health

• Insect attacks eucalyptus
• Mangrove Action Project
• Minilivestock - Minilivestock use implications

    • Gecko breeding expansion in Viet Nam
    • Bureau for Exchange and Distribution of Information on Mini- Livestock

• Organically certified NWFPs – harvesting wild and semidomesticated species
• Organic Producers and Association of Zambia
• Outlook studies
• Plant and clay dyes
• Plant more trees
• Pongamia pinnata oil
• Probona
• Projet d’Appui technique à la filière karité (ProKarité)
• Sudan Silva
• Taiga non-timber forest products
• Trade

    • ASEAN committed to controlling wildlife trade
    • Biotrade
    • Trade controls on hoodia and Asian yew trees
    • Global trade in agarwood

• Tree Aid
• Who conserves the world’s forests?

PRODUCTS AND MARKETS (Pdf )

• Açaí
• Bamboo
• Brazil nuts
• Bushmeat
• Camu camu
• Gum arabic
• Medicinal plants
• Mushrooms
• Resins

COUNTRY COMPASS (Pdf )

Armenia
Azerbaijan
Bangladesh
Botswana
Brazil
Canada
China
Colombia
Côte d’Ivoire
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Ghana
India
Ireland
Japan
Jordan
Kenya
Madagascar
Malaysia
Morocco
Namibia
Nepal
Panama
Philippines
Russian Federation
South Africa
Uganda
United States of America
Viet Nam
Zambia
Zimbabwe

ECONOOK (Pdf )

• Uganda, Kenya in cross-border pact
• Protecting the Amazon
• Brazil Amazon deforestation jumps, data show
• Ecotourism

    • Laos discovers lucrative ecotourism niche
    • Ecotourism agitates animals
    • Damming Belize
    • Ecotours

INTERNATIONAL ACTION (Pdf )

FAO
South and east asian countries ntfp network (seann)

RECENT EVENTS (Pdf )

FORTHCOMING EVENTS (Pdf )

PUBLICATIONS OF INTEREST (Pdf )

WEB SITES (Pdf )

READER'S RESPONSE (Pdf )

Non-Wood News 12

AN INFORMATION BULLETIN ON NON-WOOD FOREST PRODUCTS

March 2005


EDITORIAL (Pdf )

Forest-dependent communities have always recognized the importance of NWFPs in their everyday lives – whether as food, shelter or medicine. Over time, recognition of the importance of NWFPs in poverty alleviation and knowledge of the multiplicity of uses and benefits deriving from NWFPs have grown steadily and many NWFPs are now traded at all levels: locally, regionally, nationally and globally (although figures on this trade are often unorganized, missing or incomplete, e.g. on bushmeat).

The Special Features section in this issue of Non-Wood News emphasizes the economic importance of NWFPs and provides information on economic benefits at the local level (see the Siberian Pine Syrup Project pp. 5–6) through to the global level (see trade figures on pp. 8–9).

Traditional knowledge is a significant aspect of NWFPs, touching as it does on issues of benefit-sharing, bioprospecting and biopiracy, all of which have been covered extensively in this issue (see p. 15). Information on NGOs working with NWFPs has also been included, but we would like to hear more about NGO activity at both the grassroots and international level so please continue to send us your contributions.

Coverage of products in this issue ranges from the versatility of bamboo (used equally successfully to build houses or produce T-shirts) to the extensive use of medicinal plants worldwide. There is information on products from both tropical and temperate forests, as well as from the vast boreal areas. NWFPs exist in all regions of the world and consequently the Country Compass section is particularly rich, with information from 34 countries.

Information dissemination and networking are key aspects of today’s knowledge society – both of which have always been important aims of Non-Wood News. In 2005 we carried out an auto-evaluation exercise in order to improve our service and to give you an opportunity to make suggestions and comments. Over 600 readers completed our questionnaire (see pp. 69–70 for full results) and we were delighted that so many of you took the time to share your ideas. Thank you for such an excellent response.

This issue has started to reflect some of your suggestions and to address your comments – the most important of which regarded frequency: a vast majority wanted Non-Wood News to be issued at least twice a year (with many keen to see it as a quarterly newsletter). Accordingly, we will now be bringing you two issues yearly, which we ultimately hope will lead to a shorter and more streamlined product.

In conclusion, while many of us are not part of forest-dependent communities, we are definitely part of a wider global NWFP community. Our aim with Non-Wood News is to continue to disseminate knowledge on NWFP activities from all societal levels around the world in order to raise the profile of NWFPs and emphasize their importance – economically, ecologically and socially.

 

NON-WOOD NEWS

Non-Wood News is compiled by Tina Etherington, Forest Products Service of the FAO Forest Products and Economics Division. Editorial support for this issue was provided by Sven Walter; design, graphics and desktop publishing were coordinated by Tina Etherington.
Non-Wood News is open to contributions by readers. Contributions may be edited to fit the appropriate size and focus of the bulletin.
If you have any material that could be included in the next issue of Non-Wood News for the benefit of other readers, kindly send it, before 15 December 2005, to:

NON-WOOD NEWS - FOPW
FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome, Italy
E-mail: non-wood-news@fao.org
www.fao.org/forestry/nwfp/nonwood.htm
FAO home page: www.fao.org


Articles express the views of their authors, not necessarily those of FAO. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

 

 

Non-wood forest products (NWFP) are goods of biological origin other than wood, derived from forests, other wooded land and trees outside forests. Non-timber forest products (NTFP), another term frequently used to cover this vast array of animal and plant products, also includes small wood and fuelwood. However, these two terms are used synonymously throughout this bulletin. Other terms, such as “minor”, “secondary” or “speciality” forest products, are sometimes used to keep original names and/or titles.