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Small-scale dairying - an experience from Nepal

(by Dala Ram Pradhan, Department of Livestock Services, Nepal)

Slide 1

Small-scale Dairying - an Experience from Nepal

Dala Ram Pradhan
Department of Livestock Services
Nepal

Slide 2

Livestock Sector

Population

Growth (Last 10 yrs.)

  • Cattle: 7 million

11.5%

  • Buffalo: 3.8 million

25.0%

  • Goat: 7 million

24.5%

  • Sheep: 0.8 million

-10.0%

  • Pig: 0.9 million

54.0%

  • Poultry: 23 million

64.0%

Slide 3

Livestock Sector (cont.)

Production

Growth (Last 10 yrs.)

Milk (million MT): 1.2

30%

Meat (thousand MT): 203

32%

Egg (million): 557

47%

Wool (MT): 600

-4%

Slide 4

Major Features

  • Subsistence oriented mixed farming system

  • Production efficiency low (low input, poor genetic make up, etc.)

  • Suitable technology for small farmers (needs to be generated)

  • Marketing (volume, network, etc.)

  • Service delivery (limited coverage/ intensity, inadequate

Slide 5

History of Dairy Development

  • 1952 - Yak cheese production in Langtang

  • 1954 - Milk processing unit in Tusal, Kavre

  • 1956 - Central dairy 500 lt/hr in Kathmandu

  • 1969 - Establishment of Dairy Development Corporation

  • 1980 - Private sector dairies started

Slide 6

Status of Dairy Sector

  • Livestock sector contributes -

15% in GDP

  • Dairy sector contributes -

2/3 in Livestock sector GDP

  • Growth of milk production -

30% in last 10 yr

  • Annual milk production -

1.2 million mt. (3277 mt/day)

  • Milk marketed to industries-

16% of the total production

Slide 7

Dairy Animals

High mountains

Yak/Chauris

Mid-hills/Terai

  • Cattle: 30%

  • Buffalo: 70%

Slide 8

Promotion of Dairy Sector

  • Policy Formulation

    • Ten Year Dairy Development Plan (1991)

    • Establishment of National Dairy Development Board (1993)

    • Agricultural Perspective Plan (1993)

    • Tenth Five Year Plan

Slide 9

Promotion of Dairy Sector (cont.)

  • Service Delivery System

  • Institutional Development

    • Farmer Groups - 7,000 (90,000 Farmers)

    • Milk Cooperatives - 1,362 (166,000 Farmers)

Slide 10

Promotion of Dairy Sector (cont.)

  • Technology Transfer

    • Field level training (1 day)

    • District level training (3 days)

    • Regional level training (1 week, 2 weeks)

Slide 11

Donor Assistance

  • FAO

    • Technical Assistance

    • FAO/TCP/NEP-2253 (Dairy Training in the Eastern Region)

  • DANIDA

  • ADB

    • 3 Loan Projects (1980-2003)

    • CLDP (2004-2010)

Slide 12

Opportunities in Dairying

  • Poverty alleviation

    • 38% people below poverty line

    • Employment generation

    • Rs. 8.5 million/day to rural economy

    • 183,000 farmer directly benefited

Slide 13

Opportunities in Dairying (cont.)

  • Mixed Farming System

    • Crop and livestock highly interdependent

    • Promote livestock within the system

  • Market

    • Internal market growing

    • Import substitution for -

      • SMP + Other products: Rs. 800 million

      • Fresh milk: Rs. 270 million

Slide 14

Environmental Conservation

  • Stall feeding of good quality animals

  • Forage cultivation (on farm, community land)

Slide 15

Small-scale Dairy Processing

Slide 16

Constraints

  • Subsistence oriented farming system

    • Resource priority for crops

    • Livestock for manure and draft

  • Low production efficiency

    • More than 85% of cattle and 65% of buffalo have poor genetic make up

    • Low input

Slide 17

Constraints (cont.)

  • Inadequate service delivery

    • Government system inadequate

    • Difficult, time consuming, expensive

  • Lack of skills/knowledge

    • Natural resource depleting

    • Processing/handling skills needed

Slide 18

Constraints (cont.)

  • Marketing

    • Inadequate volume (April-July)

    • Collection difficult/expensive)

Slide 19

Constraints (cont.)

  • Poor milk quality

    • Small farms/small quantity

    • Transportation difficult

  • Seasonality in milk production

    • Very high seasonal variation (80%)

    • Peak production (Nov.-Feb.)

      • Milk holiday

    • Milk deficit (April - July)

Slide 20

Thanks


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