Protecting and promoting good nutrition in
crisis and recovery
Resource guide


Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Rome, 2005

 

Table of Contents


Reprinted 2005

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ISBN 92-5-105 257-3

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Contents

Acknowledgements

Foreword

Acronyms

Introduction

The challenge: Improving nutritional well-being and protecting livelihoods
Purpose and structure of the guide

Part I Issues and concepts for protecting and promoting good nutrition in crisis situations

The right to food
Linking food and nutritional security to livelihoods
Risk of exposure to hazards and shocks
Vulnerability and coping strategies
Household food security
The relationship between household food security and nutrition security
Threats to food security and adequate dietary intake
Threats to adequate maternal and child care feeding practices
Threats to adequate health, water, sanitation and shelter provision
Interactions between inadequate dietary intake and infection
Malnutrition
Micronutrient deficiencies
The consequences of malnutrition
Nutritional well-being: The foundation for recovery and long-term development
Further reading and resources

Part II Approaches for protecting and promoting good nutrition in crisis situations

Capacity building in crisis situations
Developing a capacity building strategy
Identifying priority technical areas of intervention
Supporting intersectoral collaboration
Current challenges in approaching and responding to crisis situations
Further reading and resources

Part III Household food security and nutrition assessment and analysis

Planning and designing an assessment of household food security and nutrition
Information requirements for saving lives and saving livelihoods
Promoting local-level and stakeholder participation
Analysis and interpretation of data and reporting
Further reading and resources

Part IV Planning and targeting household food security and nutrition actions

Identifying objectives and potential activities
Selection and screening of interventions
Selecting interventions that are complementary
Targeting
Efficient and effective implementation modalities
Further reading and resources

Part V Nutrition actions in crisis situations

Introduction
Theme I. Food production and diversification
Theme II. Access to food
Theme III. Household food utilization Storage
Theme IV. Health, water and sanitation
Theme V. Feeding and caring practices Breastfeeding, infant and child feeding practices
Theme VI. Community-based growth monitoring and promotion
Theme VII. Food and nutrition education
Theme VIII. Training and extension
Theme IX. Food aid
Theme X. Information systems
Matrix of nutrition activities in emergency situations

Part VI Technical resources and sources for methodologies and practical tools

Brief 1. Development and testing of checklists
Brief 2. Anthropometric surveys
Brief 3. Rapid appraisal techniques
Brief 4. Developing a SWOT analysis
Brief 5. Developing and using a problem tree
Brief 6. Issues related to targeting in crisis situations
Brief 7. Strategies for establishing home gardening activities, and lessons learned from Africa and Asia
Brief 8. Estimating general ration needs per person, and calculating food aid requirements
Brief 9. Issues to consider when choosing food relief commodities

Glossary

References

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