State of world aquaculture 2006

FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 500

State of world aquaculture
2006


Inland Water Resources and Aquaculture Service
Fishery Resources Division
FAO Fisheries Department

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS

Rome, 2006

Table of Contents


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ISBN 978-92-5-105631-8

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© FAO 2006

FAO Fisheries Department.
State of world aquaculture 2006.
FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 500. Rome, FAO. 2006. 134p.

ABSTRACT

Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world, except in sub-Saharan Africa. Global population demand for aquatic food products is increasing, the production from capture fisheries has levelled off, and most of the main fishing areas have reached their maximum potential. Sustaining fish supplies from capture fisheries will, therefore, not be able to meet the growing global demand for aquatic food. Aquaculture appears to have the potential to make a significant contribution to this increasing demand for aquatic food in most regions of the world; however, in order to achieve this, the sector (and aquafarmers) will face significant challenges. The key development trends indicate that the sector continues to intensify and diversify and is continuing to use new species and modifying its systems and practices. Markets, trade and consumption preferences strongly influence the growth of the sector, with clear demands for production of safe and quality products. As a consequence, increasing emphasis is placed on enhanced enforcement of regulation and better governance of the sector. It is increasingly realized that this cannot be achieved without the participation of the producers in decision-making and regulation process, which has led to efforts to empower farmers and their associations and move towards increasing self-regulation. These factors are all contributing to improve management of the sector, typically through promotion of better management practices of producers.

This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 500 pdf

Preparation of this document
Abstract
Preface
Acknowledgements

1. INTRODUCTIONpdf

2. PRODUCTION: ENVIRONMENTS, SPECIES, QUANTITIES AND VALUESpdf
Introduction
Production
Growth in production
Production by environments
Diversity of major species groups and species used in aquaculture
Value of production
Use of introduced species
The culture of ornamentals
Culture systems
References
3. MARKETS AND TRADE pdf
Introduction
Markets, trade and rural development
Exports and their impact on the economy
Impact of competition for common markets on aquaculture development
Food safety, import requirements and markets
Aquatic animal health, trade and transboundary issues
International trading agreements, laws and compliance
WTO/SPS Agreement, related issues on compliance and challenges
  for small producers
References
4. CONTRIBUTION TO FOOD SECURITY AND ACCESS TO FOODpdf
Introduction
Contribution to national food self-sufficiency
Fish consumption trends
Comparative consumption of fish versus terrestrial meat
Rural poor and aquaculture; opportunities and challenges
References
5. RESOURCE USE AND THE ENVIRONMENTpdf
Introduction
Effluents from aquaculture
Modification of coastal ecosystems and habitats
Water and land use in aquaculture
Feeding fish with fish and other feed issues
Contaminants and residues in aquaculture
Use of wild-caught broodstock, post-larvae and fry
Effects on biodiversity
Energy and resource use efficiency
Progress in environmental management of aquaculture
References
6. LEGAL, INSTITUTIONAL AND MANAGEMENT ASPECTSpdf
Introduction
Trends and developments in sector management
National institutional support and legal and policy frameworks
Participation of the civil society and the private sector in management
Privatizing research facilities
Experience of farmer societies
Safeguarding small-scale producers and poor farmers
References
7. SOCIAL IMPACTS, EMPLOYMENT AND POVERTY REDUCTIONpdf
Introduction
How aquaculture is delivering social benefits
Impact of aquaculture on rural communities
Social impacts arising from environmental change
References
8. TRENDS AND ISSUESpdf
Introduction
General trends in global aquaculture
Specific trends in global aquaculture
Major regional aquaculture development trends
References
Back coverpdf