WTO rules for agriculture compatible with development



WTO rules for agriculture
compatible with development


edited by
Jamie Morrison
and
Alexander Sarris

Download full PDF (4,394 KB)


TRADE AND MARKETS DIVISION
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Rome, 2007



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CONTENTS


Introduction pdf

1. Introduction.
Jamie Morrison and Alexander Sarris

PART 1: TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONTEXT OF THE WTO NEGOTIATIONS pdf


2. Determining the appropriate level of import protection consistent with agriculture led development in the advancement of poverty reduction and improved food security.
Jamie Morrison and Alexander Sarris

3. What types of WTO-compatible trade policies are appropriate for different stages of development?
Oliver Morrissey

4. Shallow versus deep Special and Differential Treatment (SDT) and the issue of differentiation in the WTO among groups of developing countries.
Alan Matthews

5. WTO Agreement limits as a development instrument: synergies and complementarities of WTO rules for agriculture with reform programmes sponsored by the World Bank and IMF.
John Nash

PART 2: STRUCTURING DEVELOPMENT-FRIENDLY WTO RULES pdf

6. The Doha round agricultural tariff-cutting formulae and tariff escalation.
Ramesh Sharma

7. Special products: a comprehensive approach to identification and treatment for development.
J.R. Deep Ford, Suffyan Koroma, Yukitsugu Yanoma and Hansdeep Khaira

8. The European Union preferential trade with developing countries. Total Trade Restrictiveness and the case of sugar.
Piero Conforti, Deep Ford, David Hallam, George Rapsomanikis, and Luca Salvatici

9. Cotton Developments in West and Central Africa: domestic and trade policy issues and the WTO.
John Baffes

10. The potential benefits to developing countries from domestic support reductions in developed countries.
Harry de Gorter

11. Domestic support to agriculture in developing countries.
Mario Jales

12. Roles and status of State Supported Trading Enterprises in developing countries.
Lamon Rutten

13. WTO negotiations on a agriculture: a compromise on food aid is possible.
Panos Konandreas

PART 3: REGIONAL EXPERIENCE AND OUTSTANDING ISSUES pdf

14. Emerging issues and concerns of African countries in the WTO negotiations on agriculture and the Doha Round.
Patrick N. Osakwe

15. Major issues and concerns of the Near East countries in the context of the WTO negotiations on agriculture.
Nasredin Elamin

16. China’s agricultural trade and policy under WTO rules.
Bingsheng Ke

17. Regional trade concerns in Latin America and the Caribbean and implications for WTO rules on agriculture.
William Foster and Alberto Valdés



© FAO 2007