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ANNEXES


ANNEX I: LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

Country

Name & Address

Bangladesh

Mr Gopal Chandra Sen
Chief, Programming Division
and National FIVIMS Focal Point
Planning Commission
Ministry of Finance and Planning
Government of Bangladesh
Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka
Bangladesh
(Tel) + 880-2-8114735
(E-mail) div_chief_gcs@yahoo.com


Mr Mirza Altaf Hossain
Executive Director
Bangladesh Applied Nutrition & Human Resource Development Board
Sech Bhaban, 22, Manik Mia Avenue
Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka 1207
Bangladesh
(Tel) +880-2-9117862
(Fax) +880-2-8110798
(Email) banhrdb@citechco.net

Cambodia

Mr H.E. It Nody
Under-Secretary
Department of Planning, Statistics and International Cooperation
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
#200 Preah Norodom Blvd, Phnom Penh
Cambodia
(Fax) +855-23-215686
(Email) hout@online.com.kh


Mr Kuy Huot
Deputy Director
Department of Agricultural Extension
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
#200 Preah Norodom Blvd, Phnom Penh
Cambodia
(Tel/Fax) +855-23-215819
(Email) hout@online.com.kh

China

Dr. Pi Guozhong
Project Officer
Project Management Center for Foreign Investment,
The State Council Leading Group Office of Poverty Reduction and Development
3rd Floor, South building, No 3b,
Shuang yu shu Xili, Haidan District
Beijing 100026
(Tel) +86 10 82621805
(Mob)+86 13 910723671
(Fax) +86 10 82617165
email: piguozhong@sohu.com
piguozhong@cpad.org.cn

India

Ms Anita Chaudhary
Joint Secretary
Department of Food and Public Distribution
Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food & Public Distribution
185 Krishi Bhawan
New Delhi
India
(Tel) +9111-23384308
(Fax) +9111-23070239
(Email) js_ic@nic.in


Dr Jai Singh
Deputy Technical Adviser
Technical Adviser
Food and Nutrition Board
Department of Women and Child Development
Shastri Bhawan, New Delhi 110001
India
(E-mail) drjaisinghdta@yahoo.co.in


Dr Manish Tiwari
Consultant
TCP Project on FIVIMS in India
B-9, Versova Heavens,
Versova Sea-face,
J.P. Road, Andheri (West),
Mumbai -4 00061,
India
(Email) tiwary2003@yahoo.co.uk

Indonesia

Dr Ir. Shobar Wiganda Msc
(until December 2005)
Vulnerable Task Force Coordinator
Food Security Agency
Ministry of Agriculture
Jakarta
Indonesia
(Tel) +62-21-781-6652
(Fax) +62-21-780-7806
(Email) shobar@deptan.go.id
iwan@deptan.go.id

(2006~)
Associate Professor
Graduate Study on Business Administration
University of Respati
Jalan Bambu Apus
Jakarta
Indonesia
(E-mail) iwan@deptan.go.id


Mr Iwan Malonda
Head
Food Security Information System Division
Food Security Agency
Ministry of Agriculture
2nd Floor, E-Building, Jalan Harsono Room #3, Jakarta
Indonesia
(Tel) +62-21-7805641 ext. 1223
(Fax) +62-21-7806708
(Email) iwan@deptan.go.id


Dr Hardinsyah
Associate Professor and Director for Collaboration
Department of Community Nutrition and Family Resources
Bogor Agricultural University
Darmaga Campus 16680
Indonesia
(Tel) (62-251) 624092
(Fax) (62-251) 629882
(Email) collaboration@indo.net.id

Lao PDR

Mr Savanh Hanephom
Director
Statistics Division
Department of Planning
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
Vientiane, Lao PDR
(Tel) +856-21-415359
(Fax) +856-21-415359
Email: savanhphom@yahoo.com


Dr Bounthom Phengdy
Acting Head
Mother and Child Health Division, Hygiene and Prevention Department, Ministry of Health
Vientiane, Lao PDR
(Tel) +856-21-214010, 217607
(Mob) +856-20-5618246
(Fax) +856-21-416787
(Email) bphengdy@yahoo.com

Myanmar

Mr Soe Win Maung
Assistant Director
Department of Agriculture Planning
Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation
Yangon, Myanmar
(Tel) +95-1-660530
(E-mail) dapasean@baganmail.net.mm

Nepal

Dr Siddhi Ganesh Shrestha
Senior Agriculture Officer
Foreign Aid Coordination Section of Planning Division
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
(Tel) +977-1- 4226465
(E-mail) shiddis@yahoo.com

Philippines

Ms Elsa Bayani
Officer-in-Charge, Assistant Secretary and
Concurrent Executive Director for National Nutrition Council
Department of Agriculture
Philippines
(Tel) +63-2-9298186
(Fax) +63-2-8164280
(Email) nncelsabayani@yahoo.com


Dr Maria Antonia G. Tuazon
College of Human Ecology and
Director, Regional Training Programme on Food and Nutrition Planning
University of the Philippines at Los Banos College,
Laguna 4031
Philippines
(Fax) +63-49-5362445
(Email) peachay57@yahoo.com


Ms Arlene Reario
Chief
Nutrition Surveillance Division
National Nutrition Council
P.O. Box 2490, Makati Central Post Office
Makati City, Metro Manila
Philippines
(Tel) +63-2-8164197
(Email) areario@yahoo.com
nsd_nnc@yahoo.com
nsd.nnc@da.gov.ph

Sri Lanka

Dr Wasanthi Wickramasinghe
Senior Research Officer
Hector Kobbekaduwa Agrarian Research and Training Institute (HARTI)
114 Wijerama Mawatha, Colombo 07
Sri Lanka
(Tel) +94-11-2687731
(Fax) +94-11-2692423
(Email) wasanthiwick@hotmail.com
wasanthiwick@yahoo.de


Dr Chandrani Piyasena
Senior Nutritionist and Head
Nutrition Department
Medical Research Institute
Ministry of Health, Nutrition and Uva Wellassa Development
385 Suvasiripaya Colombo 10
(Tel) +94-11-695999
(Fax) +94-11-2691495
(Email) chandrani4@hotmail.com


Dr Ranjith De Silva
Senior Lecturer/FIVIMS National Consultant
Department of Agricultural Engineering
University of Peradeniya
Peradiniya
Sri Lanka
(Tel) +94-81-2388923
(Fax) +94-812-380125
(E-mail) rpdesilva@pdn.ac.lk

Thailand

Mr Montol Jeamchareon
Director
Centre for Agricultural Information
Office of Agricultural Economics
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Phahonyothin Rd.
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
(Tel) +66-2-5793607/9405521
(E-mail) montol@oae.go.th


Ms Korntip Seneewong na Ayudhaya
Director
Division of International Organization
Bureau of International Agriculture Economics
Office of Agricultural Economics
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Phahonyothin Rd.
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
(Tel) +66-2-9407238
(Fax) +66-2-9407244
(E-mail) korntip@oae.go.th


Ms Unchana Tracho
Director
Division of livestock and Fisheries Information
Office of Agricultural Economics
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Phahonyothin Rd.
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
(Tel) +66-2-5750617
(Fax) +66-2-5790617
(E-mail) unchana@oae.go.th


Ms Nongnooch Deetae
Senior Statistician
Office of Agricultural Economics
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Phahonyothin Rd.
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
(E-mail) nongnooch@oae.go.th


Mr Supakij Santsupakij
Policy and Plan Analyst
Division of International Organization
Bureau of International Agriculture Economics
Office of Agricultural Economics
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Phahonyothin Rd.
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
(Tel) +66-2-9407238
(Fax) +66-2-9407244
(E-mail) supakij@oae.go.th


Dr Emorn Wasantwisut
Director
Institute of Nutrition
Mahidol University at Salaya
Putthamonthon
Nakorn Prathom 73170
Thailand
(Tel) (662) 4419740/8002380 ext. 208
(Fax) (662) 4419344
(Email) numdk@mahidol.ac.th
directnu@mahidol.ac.th


Dr Songsak Srianujata
Institute of Nutrition
Mahidol University at Salaya
Putthamonthon
Nakorn Prathom 73170 Bangkok
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-28002380 ext. 311
(Fax) +66-2-4419344
(Email) rassn@mahidol.ac.th


Dr Jintana Yhoung-aree
Lecturer
Community Nutrition Division
Institute of Nutrition
Mahidol University at Salaya
Putthamonthon
Nakorn Prathom 73170
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-8002380 ext.307 or 321
(Fax) +66-2 4419344
(E-mail) nujya@mahidol.ac.th


Asst. Professor Dr. Uraiporn Chittchang
Community Nutrition Section
Institute of Nutrition
Mahidol University at Salaya
Putthamonthon
Nakorn Prathom 73170
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-8002380 ext.312
(Fax) +66-2 4419344
(E-mail) nuucc@mahidol.ac.th

Viet Nam

Dr Nguyen Cong Khan
Associate Professor and Director
The National Institute of Nutrition
48 Tang Bat Ho
Hanoi
Viet Nam
(Tel) +84-4-9716058
(Mob) +84-913-235290
(Fax) +84-4-9717885
Email: nindn@hn.vnn.vn, nckhan@hn.vnn.vn

DONOR REPRESENTATIVE

Japan

Mr Nobuhiko Kaho
Director for International Agricultural Organization
International Cooperation Division
International Affairs Department
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
1-2-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-8950
(Tel) +81-3-3502-8111 (ext) 6790
(Fax) +81-3-3501-3731
(Email) nobuhiko_kaho@nm.maff.go.jp

OTHERS


ADPC

Dr R.Selvaraju
Research Scientist
Climate Risk Management
Asia Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC)
P.O.Box 4, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-5165900 ext. 412
(Fax) +66-2-5245360
(E-mail) elvarajurb@yahoo.com

EC

Mr Carlo F. Marsico
Senior Programme Officer
European Union
Delegation of the European Commission in Thailand
Kian Gwan House II -19th Floor-
140/1 Witthayu (Wireless) Road, Bangkok 10330
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-3052745
(Fax) +66-2-255 9113/4
(Email) Carlo.MARSICO@cec.eu.int

ESCAP

Mr Nokeo Ratanavong
Scientific Affairs Officer
Space Technology Applications Section
Information, Communication and Space Technology Division
Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP)
United Nations Building
Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200,
Thailand
(Tel) +662-2881458
(Fax) +662-2881085
(Email) ratanavong.unescap@un.org

FAO

Mr Christian Lovendal
Economist
Food Security and Agricultural Projects Analysis Service
FAO
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome
Italy
(Tel) +39- 06-570 55250
(E-mail) christian.lovendal@fao.org


Mr Mark Smulders
FIVIMS Coordinator
IAWG-FIVIMS Secretariat
Global Perspectives Studies Unit
FAO
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome
Italy
(Tel) +39- 06-570 53272
(E-mail) mark.smulders@fao.org


Ms Francoise Trine
Food Security Analyst
FAO/EC Food Security Programme-Phase II
Global Perspectives Studies Unit
FAO
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome
Italy
(Tel) +39- 06-570 54239
(E-mail) francoise.trine@fao.org


Mr Luca Alinovi
Programme Manager
EC/FAO Food Security Information for Action
Agricultural and Development Economics Division
Economic and Social Department
FAO
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome
Italy
(Tel) +39- 06-570 56615
(Fax) +39-06-57055522
(E-mail) luca.alinovi@fao.org


Dr Nicholas Haan
Chief Technical Advisor
Food Security Analysis Unit, Somalia
FAO/EC Somalia FSAU Project
Kalson Towers, 3rd Floor
Parklands, Nairobi
Kenya
(Tel) +254-20-3745734
(Fax) +254-20-3740598
(Email) nicholas.haan@fsau.or.ke

Japan

Dr Junichi Kudoh
Professor
Center for Northeast Asian Studies
Tohoku University
Sendai, Japan
(Tel/Fax) +81-22-2176084
E-mail: kudoh@cneas.tohoku.ac.jp

WFP

Mr Michael Sheinkman
Regional VAM Officer
Vulnerability, Analysis and Mapping (VAM)
World Food Programme, Bureau of Asia
Wave Place Building, 7th Floor
55 Wireless Rd.
Bangkok
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-6554115 ext. 2430
(Fax) +66-2-6594415
(Mob) +66-1-909-0622
(E-mail) michael.sheinkman@wfp.org


Dr Nisha Srivastava
Head, Research
Result Based Management and VAM
World Food Programme
2 Poorvi Marg,
New Delhi 110057
India
(Tel) +91-11-26150001 ext 2213
(Fax) +91-11-26150019
(E-mail) nisha.srivastava@wfp.org

WHO/SEARO

Dr Rukhsana Haider (could not attend)
Regional Adviser, Nutrition for Health and Development
World Health Organization
I.P. Estate
New Delhi 110 002
India
(Tel) (91-11) 23370804 ext. 26313/12
(Fax) (91-11) 23378510/23379395
(E-mail) haiderr@whosea.org

SECRETARIAT



Dr Biplab K. Nandi
Senior Food and Nutrition Officer
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
39 Thanon Phra Atit
Bangkok 10200
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-6974143
(Fax) +66-2-697-4405
(E-mail) biplab.nandi@fao.org


Mr Naoki Minamiguchi
Vulnerability Analysis Coordinator
Asia FIVIMS Project, GCP/RAS/170/JPN
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
39 Thanon Phra Atit
Bangkok 10200
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-6974309
(Fax) +66-2-697-4445
(E-mail) naoki.minamiguchi@fao.org


Dr Lalita Bhattacharjee
Nutrition Consultant
Asia FIVIMS Project, GCP/RAS/170/JPN
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
39 Thanon Phra Atit
Bangkok 10200
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-6974304
(Fax) +66-2-697-4445
(E-mail) lalita.bhattacharjee@fao.org


Ms Wilai Thearapati
Secretary
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
39 Thanon Phra Atit
Bangkok 10200
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-6974265
(Fax) +66-2-697-4405
(E-mail) wilai.thearapati@fao.org


Ms Siriporn Charoenkijgasat
Key Indicators Data System Administrator/Image Processing Assistant
Asia FIVIMS Project, GCP/RAS/170/JPN
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
39 Thanon Phra Atit
Bangkok 10200
Thailand
(Tel) +66-2-6974309
(Fax) +66-2-697-4445
(E-mail) siriporn.charoenkijgasat@fao.org

ANNEX II: OPENING ADDRESS BY ADG/RR

REGIONAL EXPERT CONSULTATION OF THE ASIA PACIFIC NETWORK FOR FOOD AND NUTRITION ON FIVIMS INITIATIVES IN THE RAP REGION AND THE MEETING ON FOOD INSECURITY AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES AND LESSONS LEARNED IN ASIA

BANGKOK 15-18 NOVEMBER 2005

FAO REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

OPENING ADDRESS

by

He Changchui
Assistant Director-General and
FAO Regional Representative for Asia and the Pacific

Distinguished participants
Colleagues from FAO
Ladies and Gentlemen

It is indeed a pleasure for me to address this important Regional Expert Consultation of the Asia Pacific Network for Food and Nutrition (ANFN) on Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Information Mapping Systems (FIVIMS) Initiatives in the RAP Region and the Meeting on Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Assessment Methodologies and Lessons Learned in Asia. On behalf of the FAO Director-General, Jacques Diouf, and on my behalf, I welcome you all to the ANFN Consultation and FIVIMS Meeting. I understand that the former is fourth in the series of ANFN Consultations.

I would like to first acknowledge the generous support given by the Government of Japan through the Japan funded Trust Fund Project, known as the Asia FIVIMS Project, for this Meeting. Japan's collaboration and cooperation in FIVIMS and related activities is indeed noteworthy.

I note that we have an impressive group of experts representing various countries of the Asia-Pacific region, our colleagues from FAO (from the regional offices for Asia and the Pacific and Africa and from headquarters in Rome), the World Food Programme (from the Asia Office in Bangkok and from headquarters in Rome), UNESCAP, Bangkok, the Asia Disaster Preparedness Centre, Thailand, and our partners from Japan as well as other experts. I extend a warm welcome to all of you!

Since the UN Conferences of the 1990s, in particular the International Conference on Nutrition (ICN) in 1992 and the World Food Summit (WFS) 1996 and the WFS: five years later in 2002, governments affirmed their commitment to achieving food security for all and the immediate goal of halving the number of undernourished by 2015. The WFS also recognized the need to target people and areas most at risk to hunger and malnutrition, identify their causes and take remedial actions. Almost all of FAO’s activities, in one way or another, have at their base the WFS and its target. FAO believes that the WFS and related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are attainable. The world already produces enough food for all. The problem is that the hungry and malnourished cannot take advantage of this opportunity.

At the outset, I would like to point out that measurement and monitoring of what happens in the world is one of the fundamental mandates of the United Nations. The responsibility of FAO is of course to monitor food and agriculture at the global level, but the promotion of these activities at the country and subnational levels is equally important. Such monitoring and measurement applied to the problem of food insecurity or, more specifically to food insecurity and vulnerability, serves the objective of identifying those who are malnourished, food insecure and vulnerable. This is critical for targeted and prioritized action.

FAO has been traditionally preparing estimates referring to the prevalence of undernourishment in connection with its World Food Survey reports. The principal aim of the estimates has been to provide information on the broad dimension of the hunger problem in developing countries. FAO has been key to promoting agriculture, nutrition, forestry, fisheries and rural development, and to facilitating achievement of the World Food Summit goal of eradicating hunger and malnutrition. The Organization is a world centre of food and agricultural information and knowledge and a forum for policy dialogue and forging agreements among nations. Its work in these areas, on standard setting and on provision of global public goods, both underpins and complements the activities that it directly targets in helping to achieve the Millennium Development Goals.

It is therefore very appropriate that the theme of this year’s Consultation and Meeting is “FIVIMS initiatives in the RAP Region and Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Assessment Methodologies and Lessons learned in Asia.”

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Hunger and malnutrition inflict heavy costs on individuals and households, communities and nations, eroding human capital, reducing resilience to shocks and reducing productivity. Undernourishment and deficiencies in micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) cost more than five million children their lives every year, cost households in the developing world more than 220 million years of productive life from family members whose lives are cut short or impaired by disabilities related to malnutrition, and cost developing countries billions of dollars in lost productivity and consumption.

It is crucial that FAO programmes step up action if we are to deliver on the pledges made at the Millennium Summit. The MDGs with their related time-bound targets and indicators are designed as an agenda for action by countries with support from the international community. FAO currently is reviewing how its own activities can assist countries in the urgent and ambitious effort of meeting the MDGs, and complement the work of UN partners.

An important first step in combating food insecurity is the identification of food insecure and vulnerable groups, the prevalence and degree of low food intake, the quality and quantity of diets and undernutrition among these groups and the causes of their food insecurity and vulnerability. Such information makes it possible to monitor and assess the situation and to design and, eventually, evaluate possible policies and interventions. Unfortunately, such information is lacking in many countries, both developing and developed.

An ongoing assessment of different environmental, economic, food and nutrition and social indicators with identification and monitoring for the information needed to tailor effective relief and rehabilitation measures is urgently required. Taking account of such differences in underlying causes of hunger and poverty and countries’ vulnerability to natural disasters and human-induced crises, monitoring potential hunger hotspots and responding effectively to the crises are also challenges for the FIVIMS Programme.

Tracking weather conditions and crop prospects in regions regularly buffeted by monsoons, droughts and other recurring weather patterns are other critical issues being addressed under the FIVIMS. Many countries that are plagued by unfavourable weather also face difficult economic conditions, with their governments implementing crisis prevention and mitigation programmes and establishing channels for relief and rehabilitation efforts.

Consequently, developing assessment and monitoring tools and methodologies represents a high priority on the agenda for FIVIMS. Many countries have established statistical services and systems that generate and analyse information. Some categories of existing national information systems include agricultural systems, health information systems, land, water and climatic information systems, early warning systems, household food security and nutrition information systems, market information systems and vulnerability assessment and mapping systems. At the national level, strengthened and more integrated food insecurity and vulnerability information systems will provide better and more up-to-date information. The policy-makers and members of civil society concerned with food security issues at all levels can thus facilitate the assessment of policy and programme options for improving nutrition situations. Insights from FIVIMS include recognition that there is a window of opportunity to improve the nutritional status of populations, especially among vulnerable groups of women, infants and young children.

It is urgent that our programmes reach out and facilitate countries to establish quality food insecurity information systems that will provide timely information needed both to formulate effective policies and programmes and to monitor progress on achieving global, national and local goals.

I am particularly pleased that the ANFN and Asia FIVIMS project have collaborated to organize this Consultation and Meeting. The ANFN has its track record of promoting food and nutrition activities with a multidisciplinary and developmental mandate and FIVIMS has provided an excellent opportunity to take this forward. I wish to laud the efforts and progress of the Asia FIVIMS Project in identifying technical entry points for assistance and collaboration in support of FIVIMS establishment and implementation in the region.

In conclusion, I would like to reiterate that FAO looks forward to your continued cooperation with the ANFN and the Asia FIVIMS Project. I wish you success in your deliberations and I am confident that with your expertise, you will work towards strengthening efforts along with FAO in its commitment towards meeting the goals of eliminating hunger and malnutrition.

ANNEX III: OPENING ADDRESS BY DONOR REPRESENTATIVE

REGIONAL EXPERT CONSULTATION OF THE ASIA PACIFIC NETWORK FOR FOOD AND NUTRITION ON FIVIMS INITIATIVES IN THE RAP REGION AND THE MEETING ON FOOD INSECURITY AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES AND LESSONS LEARNED IN ASIA

BANGKOK 15-18 NOVEMBER 2005

FAO REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
OPENING ADDRESS

by

Nobuhiko Kaho
Director for International Agricultural Organization
International Cooperation Division
International Affairs Department
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

On behalf of the Government of Japan, I have great pleasure and honor to attend this FIVIMS Regional Expert Consultation and to have the opportunity to give an opening address.

First of all, I would like to express my most sincere condolence over the victims of the earthquake disaster in Pakistan and India last month and the tsunami in Indonesia and other countries last December. Natural disaster-induced food insecurity may be comparatively smaller than those brought about by chronic food deficiencies, but FIVIMS rightly covers both kinds of food insecurity and vulnerability. I understand according to the program, that this issue will be discussed under agenda item 3 tomorrow.

Now let's recall the origin of the Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Information Mapping System or FIVIMS. As most of you here know, it goes back to the World Food Summit in Rome, just nine years and two days ago. I am afraid that it may take a little of your patience, but allow me to introduce the concerned part from the "World Food Summit Plan of Action".

It is mentioned in "paragraph 20 (a)" that:

governments, in partnership with all actors of civil society, as appropriate, will develop and periodically update, where necessary, a national food insecurity and vulnerability information and mapping system, indicating areas and populations, including at local level, affected by or at-risk of hunger and malnutrition, and elements contributing to food insecurity, making maximum use of existing data and other information systems in order to avoid duplication of efforts.

The Government of Japan also approved of this initiative and our Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) has provided financial contributions to FAO since 1997 in order to support the Asia component of the global FIVIMS. Its total assistance amounts to more than three million and three hundred thousand (3,300,000) US dollars so far. Our contribution extends also to human resources. In this regard, I would like to mention that one of the key persons of today's meeting is Mr. Minamiguchi. He has devoted himself to the Asia-FIVIMS Project since the beginning. As a donor of the Project, I would like not only to acknowledge his efforts but also pay my profound respect to him, together with all of you.

During the last few weeks my colleagues in Japan have been making requests for an additional funding of 320 thousand US dollars to the Finance Ministry, in order to complete this Asia-FIVIMS project in two years and a half. The Japanese government's budgetary system has a single-yearly basis and this kind of negotiation is carried out this season every year. The response of the financial authorities this year seems harder and more severe than usual, but we have been trying our best to realize full support to the Project.

Alongside, in the recent years, our Government has stepped up responsibility for the transparency and accountability of each governmental budget and policy including ODA, to our tax payers. Indeed, it goes without saying that we need an excellent outcome at every stage of the Project which would then need to be completed with an even more excellent final product.

The Government of Japan expects the participating countries to be more positively involved in this Project and to optimize use of the project so as to develop and periodically update their national FIVIMS. At the same time we would like to request the FAO Secretariat or FAO RAP not only to produce a useful system by the end of the Project but to also provide continuous technical assistance to the targeted countries as a knowledge, learning and capacity-building organization. We believe that FIVIMS including its related fields is one of the areas where FAO has a comparative advantage and the Government of Japan has therefore supported this initiative.

As you know, the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) is monitoring the progress of the World Food Summit's goals. In September next year this Committee is expected to make a mid-term review of the World Food Summit Plan of Action at its 32nd session in Rome. FIVIMS issues may be discussed then because it is one of the outcomes of the Plan of Action. We hope member countries, particularly Asian countries, will be able to report proudly their progress in this area, with the introduction of Japan's contribution, if possible.

This time I cannot be here with you until the end of the program because I have to attend the FAO Conference in Rome. However I came over to Bangkok as a representative of the donor, because I would like all the participants to know our strong intention and expectations that I have just mentioned. According to the schedule, a series of stimulating presentations and exciting discussions are awaiting for you. I hope to get an update later on the fruits of this meeting from the FAO Secretariat.

Last but not least, I would like to express my highest appreciation to Dr. Nandi, Mr. Minamiguchi and the team for all their effort in organizing this Meeting. I expect all of you to enhance the shared experiences and lessons learned and continue to give the much needed encouragement for better national, regional and global FIVIMS. I apologize finally for having laid too much stress just on FIVIMS in my speech.

Thank you for your attention.

ANNEX IV: OBJECTIVES, AGENDA, EXPECTED OUTPUTS

Regional Expert Consultation of the Asia Pacific Network for Food and Nutrition on FIVIMS Initiatives in the RAP Region and the Meeting on Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Assessment Methodologies and Lessons Learned in Asia

Amari Watergate Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand, 15 - 18 November 2005

OBJECTIVES

1. Share experiences and lessons gained by participating countries

2. Review food insecurity and vulnerability methodologies utilized by selected FIVIMS countries in Asia

3. Discuss issues related to reducing vulnerability to food insecurity associated with natural disasters

4. Discuss the International Conference on Nutrition and World Food Summit:5yl follow-up activities

AGENDA

The workshop will include presentations by resource persons and participants as well as discussions that will lead to making concrete recommendations for follow-up actions. An annotated provisional agenda is:

1. Review of Food and Nutrition Insecurity and Vulnerability Assessment Methodologies
2. Selected Country Presentations on FIVIMS Status
3. Challenges to Reducing Vulnerability to Food Insecurity associated with Natural Disasters
4. Review of International Conference on Nutrition (ICN) / WFS:5yl Follow-Up Activities
5. Working Groups on Sharing FIVIMS Experiences and Lessons Learned

EXPECTED OUTPUTS

The expected outputs of the workshop are:

1. A better understanding of the FIVIMS status particularly in Asia

2. FIVIMS methodologies and implementation and application issues reviewed and best practices identified

3. FIVIMS methodologies considered for adoption by those countries yet to establish FIVIMS, and improvement of methodologies by the countries where FIVIMS is operational in order to enhance the national capacity to identify the food insecure and vulnerable as well as to make timely and effective interventions

4. Recommendations for strengthening strategic food and nutrition actions and interventions

ANNEX V: TENTATIVE PROGRAMME

Regional Expert Consultation of the Asia Pacific Network for Food and Nutrition on FIVIMS Initiatives in the RAP Region and the Meeting on Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Assessment Methodologies and Lessons Learned in Asia

Amari Watergate Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand, 15 - 18 November 2005

Programme

DAY 1 TUESDAY 15 NOVEMBER 2005

0830 hrs Registration

INTRODUCTION

0900 hrs

WELCOME REMARKS: Biplab K Nandi, Secretary, ANFN and Senior Food and Nutrition Officer, FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (RAP), Bangkok

0905

INTRODUCTION OF PARTICIPANTS

0910

OPENING ADDRESS: He Changchui, Assistant Director-General and FAO Regional Representative for Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok

0920

OPENING ADDRESS: Nobuhiko Kaho, Donor Representative, International Affairs Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japan

0930

PHOTO SESSION / REFRESHMENT

1000

ELECTION OF THE OFFICE BEARERS OF THE CONSULTATION/MEETING

OBJECTIVES, ADOPTION OF AGENDA AND ORGANIZATION OF THE CONSULTATION: Biplab K Nandi, Senior Food and Nutrition Officer, RAP, Bangkok

AGENDA ITEM 1: REVIEW OF FOOD AND NUTRITION INSECURITY AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES

Facilitator: Naoki Minamiguchi, Vulnerability Analysis Coordinator, FAO-Asia FIVIMS Trust Fund Project GCP/RAS/170/JPN, RAP, Bangkok

Rapporteur: Maria Antonia G. Tuazon, College of Human Ecology and Director, Regional Training Programme on Food and Nutrition Planning, University of the Philippines at Los Banos, The Philippines

1010 hrs

Addressing Vulnerability Issues in FIVIMS: Christian Lovendal, Economist, Food Security and Agricultural Projects Analysis Service, FAO, Rome

1040

Identifying Food Insecure and Vulnerable Areas in the Philippines through FIVIMS: Arlene Reario, Chief, Nutritional Surveillance Division, National Nutrition Council, The Philippines

1110

Food Insecurity Atlas of Indonesia, its Indicators and Usefulness for Vulnerability Mitigation: Iwan Malonda, Head of Food Security Information System Division, Food Security Agency, Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia

1140

Discussion and questions

1200

Lunch

Facilitator: Mark Smulders, FIVIMS Coordinator, IAWG-FIVIMS Secretariat, Global Perspectives Studies Unit, FAO, Rome

Rapporteurs: R. Selvaraju, Research Scientist, Asia Disaster Prevention Center (ADPC), Thailand, and Arlene Reario, Chief, Nutritional Surveillance Division, National Nutrition Council, The Philippines

1330 hrs

Assessment of Food Insecurity and Vulnerability and Development of Vulnerability Forecasting Methodology for Sri Lanka: Ranjith De Silva, Senior Lecturer, Department of Agricultural Engineering, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

1400

Food Security Phase Classification Concepts and Practice in Somalia: Nicholas Haan, Chief Technical Advisor, Food Security Analysis Unit (FSAU) Project, FAO, Nairobi, Kenya

1430

FIVIMS in India: User Needs & Links to Government Policy and Review of Food Insecurity & Vulnerability Mapping Methodologies: Anita Chaudhary, Joint Secretary, Department of Food and Public Distribution and Manish Tiwari, Consultant, TCP Project on FIVIMS in India

1500

Discussion and questions

1520

COFFEE / REFRESHMENT

1540

Classification of Rural and Urban Areas According to the Prevalence of Food Insecurity and Poverty in Cape Verde: Franscoise Trine, Food Security Analyst, IAWG-FIVIMS Secretariat, Global Perspectives Studies Unit, FAO, Rome

1610

Food and Nutrition Security in India: Bridging the Gaps in Measurement and Mapping: Nisha Srivastava, Head, Research, RBM and VAM, WFP, New Delhi, India and Michael Sheinkman, VAM Regional Officer, WFP, Bangkok

1640

Dietary Diversity as a Tool to Measure Food Security - Project Experiences from Asia: Lalita Bhattacharjee, Nutrition Consultant, Asia FIVIMS Project GCP/RAS/170/JPN, RAP, Bangkok

1710

Discussion and questions

1730

Meeting of Rapporteurs

1900

Reception Dinner, Pool side


DAY 2: WEDNESDAY 16 NOVEMBER 2005

AGENDA ITEM 2: SELECTED COUNTRY PRESENTATION ON FIVIMS STATUS

Facilitator: Biplab K Nandi, Senior Food and Nutrition Officer, FAO RAP, Bangkok

Rapporteurs: Lalita Bhattacharjee, Nutrition Consultant, Asia FIVIMS Project GCP/RAS/170/JPN, RAP, Bangkok, and Jintana Yhoung-Aree, Lecturer, Community Nutrition Division, Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Thailand

0830 hrs

Bangladesh: Country Update on FIVIMS: Gopal Chandra Sen, Chief, Programming Division, Planning Commission, Ministry of Finance and Planning, Government of Bangladesh, Dhaka

0900

Cambodia: Country Update on FIVIMS: H.E.It Nody, Under-Secretary, Department of Planning, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries and Kuy Huot, Deputy Director, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Cambodia

0930

Lao PDR: Country Update on FIVIMS: Savanh Hanephom, Director, Statistics Division, Department of Planning, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Vientiane, Lao PDR

1000

Discussion and questions

1020

COFFEE / REFRESHMENT

1040

Myanmar: Country Update on FIVIMS-related Activities: Soe Win Maung, Assistant Director, Department of Agriculture Planning, Yangon, Myanmar

1110

Thailand: Country Update on FIVIMS: Montol Jeamcharoen, Director, Centre of Agricultural Information, Office of Agricultural Economics, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, and Songsak Srianujata, Chairman of the National FIVIMS Technical Subcommittee, Thailand

1140

Discussion and questions

1200

Lunch

AGENDA ITEM 3: CHALLENGES TO REDUCING VULNERABILITY TO FOOD INSECURITY ASSOCIATED WITH NATURAL DISASTERS

Facilitator: Christian Lovendal, Economist, Food Security and Agricultural Projects Analysis Service, FAO, Rome

Rapporteurs: Naoki Minamiguchi, Vulnerability Analysis Coordinator, FAO-Asia FIVIMS Trust Fund Project GCP/RAS/170/JPN, RAP, Bangkok, and Ranjith De Silva, Senior Lecturer, Department of Agricultural Engineering, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

1330 hrs

Application of Climate Information for Reducing Vulnerability to Food Insecurity Associated with Natural Disasters: A.R Subbiah, Team Leader, Asia Disaster Prevention Center (ADPC), Thailand.

1400

Food Security and Safety Policy and Vulnerability Relief: Shobar Wiganda, Director, Food Surveillance Centre, Food Security Agency, Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia

1430

Ensuring Nutritional Security During Disasters - Philippine Experience: Arlene Reario, Chief, Nutritional Surveillance Division, National Nutrition Council, The Philippines

1500

Discussion and questions

1520

COFFEE / REFRESHMENT

1540

Regional Cooperative Mechanisms in Space Technology Applications to Reduce Vulnerabilities and Risks to Disasters in Asia and the Pacific: Nokeo Ratanavong, Scientific Affairs Officer, Space Technology Applications Section, United Nations Economic and Social Council for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP), Bangkok

1610

Drought and Food Insecurity Monitoring with the Use of Geospatial Information by FAO: Naoki Minamiguchi, Vulnerability Analysis Coordinator, FAO-Asia FIVIMS Trust Fund Project GCP/RAS/170/JPN, RAP, Bangkok

1640

Short-term Assessment of Food Insecurity and Vulnerability in Sri Lanka with Emphasis on Impacts of Drought: Wasanthi Wickramasinghe, Senior Research Officer, Hector Kobbekaduwa Agrarian Research and Training Institute (HARTI), Colombo, Sri Lanka

1710

Discussion and questions

1730

Meeting of Rapporteurs


DAY 3: THURSDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2005

AGENDA ITEM 3 - CONTINUED

Facilitator and Rapporteur: Naoki Minamiguchi, Vulnerability Analysis Coordinator, FAO-Asia FIVIMS Trust Fund Project GCP/RAS/170/JPN, RAP, Bangkok

0830 hrs

Development of Snow Cover Maps to Monitor Severe Winters Causing Food Insecurity in Mongolia: Junichi Kudoh, Professor, Center for Northeast Asian Studies, Tohoku University, Japan

0900

Discussion and questions

AGENDA ITEM 4: REVIEW OF ICN/WFS: 5YL FOLLOW UP ACTIVITIES (COUNTRY PRESENTATION)

Facilitator: Lalita Bhattacharjee, Nutrition Consultant, Asia FIVIMS Project GCP/RAS/170/JPN, RAP, Bangkok

Rapporteurs: Arlene Reario, Chief, Nutritional Surveillance Division, National Nutrition Council, The Philippines and Wasanthi Wickramasinghe, Senior Research Officer, Hector Kobbekaduwa Agrarian Research and Training Institute (HARTI), Sri Lanka

0910 hrs

Viet Nam:

Nguyen Cong Khan, Director, The National Institute of Nutrition

0930

Thailand:

Emorn Wasantwisut, Director, Institute of Nutrition

0950

Sri Lanka:

Chandrani Piyasena, Nutritionist, Medical Research Institute, Ministry of Health, Nutrition and Uva Wellassa Development

1010

Discussion

1030

COFFEE / REFRESHMENT

1040

Philippines:

Elsa Bayani, Officer-in-Charge, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Field Operation, Department of Agriculture and Maria Tuazon, Dean, College of Human Ecology and Director, Regional Training Programme on Food and Nutrition Planning, University of the Philippines at Los Banos College

1100

Nepal:

Siddhi Ganesh Shrestha, Senior Agriculture Officer, Foreign Aid Coordination Section of Planning Division, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives

1120

Lao PDR:

Bounthom Phengdy, Acting Head, Mother and Child Health Division, Hygiene and Prevention Department, Ministry of Health

1140

Discussion

1200

Lunch

1330

Indonesia:

Hardinsyah, Associate Professor, Department of Community Nutrition and Family Resources, Bogor Agricultural University

1350

India:

Jai Singh, Deputy Technical Adviser, Technical Adviser, Food and Nutrition Board, Department of Women and Child Development

1410

China:

Pi Guozhong, Project Officer, Project Management Center for Foreign Investment, The State Council Leading Group Office of Poverty Reduction and Development

1430

Bangladesh:

Altaf Hossain, Executive Director, Bangladesh Applied Nutrition & Human Resource Development Board

1450

Discussion

1510

COFFEE / REFRESHMENT

AGENDA ITEM 5: SHARING FIVIMS EXPERIENCES AND LESSONS LEARNED: WORKING GROUPS

Facilitators: Naoki Minamiguchi, Vulnerability Analysis Coordinator, and Lalita Bhattacharjee, Nutrition Consultant, Asia FIVIMS Trust Fund Project GCP/RAS/170/JPN, RAP, Bangkok

1530 hrs

Briefing and outline of working group process (Three working groups)


DISCUSSION TOPICS:
· Reviewing findings from the methodologies used

· Identifying and determining the strengths and weaknesses of FIVIMS methodologies

· Providing suggestions for strengthening FIVIMS approaches to improve the identification and targeting of vulnerable populations/areas as well as effective interventions

1730

Meeting of Rapporteurs


DAY 4: FRIDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2005

PRESENTATION OF WORKING GROUPS

Facilitators: Naoki Minamiguchi, Vulnerability Analysis Coordinator, and Lalita Bhattacharjee, Nutrition Consultant, Asia FIVIMS Trust Fund Project GCP/RAS/170/JPN, RAP, Bangkok

0830 hrs

Presentation of Working Group Outputs followed by Questions and Discussions

1030

Drafting of the Report of the Consultation/Meeting

ADOPTION OF REPORT AND CONCLUSIONS

Facilitator: Biplab K Nandi, Senior Food and Nutrition Officer, RAP, Bangkok

1330 hrs

Presentation and Adoption of the Report of the Consultation

1500

Closing of the ANFN Consultation and Asia FIVIMS Meeting

ANNEX VI: WORKING GROUPS DISCUSSION

Day III 17 November 2005

AGENDA Item 5: SHARING FIVIMS EXPERIENCES AND LESSONS GAINED - WORKING GROUPS DISCUSSION

Facilitators:

I. General Instructions to WG Participants

1. Please select a group leader and a rapporteur for your group.

2. Discuss and answer the questions as per the given terms of reference for the three discussion topics given below.

3. Please feel free to provide additional inputs and suggestions, as appropriate.

II. Discussion Topics

III. Terms of Reference for Working Groups

a) Highlight major national FIVIMS activities/programmes common/unique to countries

b)Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the FIVIMS methodologies used

c) Identify information and resource gaps and discuss challenges to the utilization of the FIVIMS methodologies and the constraints faced.

d) Provide doable suggestions for strengthening FIVIMS approaches to improve the identification and targeting of vulnerable populations and/or areas including the provision of policy support

e) Explore possibilities /options which would lead to effective and timely interventions, giving specific examples.

f) Make a presentation on the outcomes of the discussions.

IV. Expected Outputs

V. Formation of Working Groups

Names of Participants

Group I

Group II

Group III

Bayani (PHL) Tuazon (PHL) Reario (PHL)
Winganda (INS) Malonda (INS) Hardinsyah (INS)
DeSilva (SRL) Huot (CAM) Chandrani (SRL)
Singh (IND) Wickramasinghe (SRL) Chaudhary (IND)
Seenewong (THA) Tracho (THA) Santsupakij (THA)
Chittchang (THA) Yhoung-Aree (THA) Hossain (BGD)
Guozhong(CHN) Shrestha (NEP) Khan (VNM)
Savanh (LAO) Sen (BGD) Maung (MYAN)
Smulders (FAO) Phengdy (LAO) Selvaraju (ADPC)
Sheinkman (WFP) Haan (FAO) Lovendal (FAO)
  Srivastava (WFP)  

 

Kudoh (JPN)

Ratanavong (ESCAP)

Note:

1. The participants have been categorized into three groups based on their representation from countries/organizations where FIVIMS is in different stages of progress/FIVIMS support being provided.

2. It is intended that participants share lessons learned from those countries/country participants where FIVIMS has shown progress and possibly some success.

3. Constraints and problems faced by countries towards not having yet established FIVIMS/not having utilized FIVIMS methodologies will also need to be shared and discussed.

VI. Discussion Topics/Questions

Q1. Recalling the presentations and discussions made to date, highlight FIVIMS and related programmes and activities in operation/to be operationalized and identify the strengths and weaknesses of the FIVIMS methodologies used/to be used.

Programme/Activity

Methodology

Strengths

Weaknesses

Programme/Activity 1

Methodology 1



Programme/Activity 2

Methodology 2



Programme/Activity 3

Methodology 3







[Examples]

Strengths:

Weaknesses:

Q2. List other major national food security, nutrition and disaster programmes and activities that are recommended for the utilization of FIVIMS methodologies/approaches for effective and timely interventions and/or improved policy and decision making.







[Examples]

Q3. Identify information and resource gaps and discuss challenges to the utilization of the FIVIMS methodologies and the constraints faced.







[Examples]

Challenges to Utilization:

Q4. Provide doable suggestions for strengthening FIVIMS approaches to improve the identification and targeting of vulnerable populations and/or areas including the provision of policy support







[Examples]

Q5. Explore possibilities/options which would lead to effective and timely interventions, giving specific examples.







[Examples]

ANNEX VII: MATRIX OF FIVIMS RELATED PROGRAMMES/ACTIVITIES: APPLICATION, STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES

Category

Programmes/ Activity

Methodology

Purpose/Application

Strengths

Constraints

Data collection

Primary data

Survey, livelihood profiling etc.,

Analysis and planning for programmes

Detailed and accurate, objective oriented, inclusion of additional variable possible

Expensive, time consuming and manpower intensive, less frequent and sampling frame


Secondary data

Reviews, documentation

Analysis and planning for policy

Easy, readily available, cheap, allows comparision and high spatial coverage

Difficult to access and update, requires statistical processing, not disaggregated

Identification

Identification of priority vulnerable areas

Principle Component Analysis (PCA)

Selection of indicators

Composite index derived from large number factors impacting on food security status. Identify the dominant factors responsible for vulnerability.

Index does not necessarily represent core causes


Selecting indicators

Statistical analysis and PCA

Identifying vulnerable groups and targeting

Deriving composite index and factor reduction

Core cause of food security is not represented

Assessment

Drought assessment and monitoring

Normalized Deviation Vegetation Index (NDVI)

Emergency preparedness

Frequent monitoring, large spatial domain, quick

Difficult to distinguish crops and other vegetation


Determination of food availability at national level

Food Balance Sheet (FBS)

Policy decisions on imports, consumption and trade

Data available for all major crops

Minor crops are not covered, does not reflect household level food and nutritional security


Estimating food availability

Food supply / energy/ nutrient supply

Policy decisions on food supply/import/export/trade

-

-


Vulnerability analysis

Ranking

Identification and targeting vulnerable areas/population

Simple and understandable

Subjective


Mapping

Geographical Information Systems (GIS)


Visualization of complete information

Difficult to interpret some times


Poverty mapping

Ranking

Targeting food security programmes

Simple

Few indicators are used



PCA and cluster analysis



Large data handling in PCA


Food insecurity

K-means clustering, discriminate analysis, descriptive and correlation analysis

Identify target population for food security programmes

Identifies outliers

Clustering is subjective

Vulnerability reduction

Snow mapping

Satellite analysis (NOAA)

Assessing severe winter and forewarning

Does not require ground infrastructure, data and software are available

Cannot determine depth of snow and requires skill


Crop area assessment

Forecasting

Food availability projections

Data readily available Easy to use

Gives only macro level estimates


Early warning

Flood early warning

Emergency/disaster preparedness

Value addition

Reducing impact of floods

Not readily available and require skill to interpret and translate for local situations


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