RAP PUBLICATION 2006/03

RAP PUBLICATION 2006/03

The State of
Food and Agriculture in Asia and the Pacific
2006

   
 
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
Bangkok, 2006
   
 

Table of Contents



The designation and presentation of material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers and boundaries.

All rights reserved. Reproduction and dissemination of material in this information product for educational or other non-commercial purposes are authorized without any prior written permission from the copyright holders provided the source is fully acknowledged. Reproduction of material in this information product for sale or other commercial purposes is prohibited without written permission of the copyright holders. Applications for such permission should be addressed to Mr. David Dawe, Senior Food Systems Economist, FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, Maliwan Mansion, 39 Phra Atit Road, Bangkok 10200, Thailand or by e-mail to david.dawe@fao.org.

© FAO 2006

Photo credits:

Cover photos from top left to bottom right are courtesy of:


FAO/13504/I. De Borhegyi


FAO/17322/N. Rubery


FAO/17013/G. Bizzarri


FAO/17955/J. Y. Piel




All inside photos not on the cover are courtesy of FAO/P. Johnson.


For copies write to:

David Dawe


Senior Food Systems Economist


FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific


Maliwan Mansion, 39 Phra Atit Road


Bangkok 10200


THAILAND


Tel: (+66) 2 697 4000


Fax: (+66) 2 697 4445


E-mail: david.dawe@fao.org


Contents

Preface

The State of Food and Agriculture in Asia and the Pacific

Poverty and the role of agriculture
Production, the environment and natural resources
Food consumption and nutrition
Marketing, trade and food security

Box: Can contracts help small farmers participate in more globalized food chains?

Feature: Development, science and markets for disaster risk reduction

Focus on the long-term fundamentals
Be prepared
Utilize scientific knowledge in designing interventions
Use markets when appropriate

Feature: Trade liberalization, poverty and food security

Conceptual linkages between trade and poverty
Effects of trade reforms on poverty
Protectionism is dangerous, although it may be necessary in some circumstances
Experience with trade liberalization
Some general lessons

References