GETTING STARTED! RUNNING A JUNIOR 
FARMER FIELD AND LIFE SCHOOL
GETTING STARTED!
RUNNING A JUNIOR FARMER
FIELD AND LIFE SCHOOL



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2007

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ISBN 978-92-5-105724-7

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© FAO 2007


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part I (482 KB)

Foreword

Acronyms

PART A: INTRODUCTION TO THE JFFLS APPROACH
A.1  HIV/AIDS and the orphan crisis
A.2  Empowering children through JFFLS
A.3  The origins of JFFLS
A.4  JFFLS guiding principles
A.5  The Getting started! manual
A.6  References

Part II (521 KB)
PART B: THE NINE STEPS TO GETTING STARTED
Step 1: Planning
1.1  Minimum management needs, roles and
      responsibilities
1.2  Stakeholder identification, community
      mobilization and involvement
1.3  Selecting and developing a site
1.4  Initial food support discussions
1.5  Different JFFLS modalities
1.6  Costing
1.7  References
Step 2: Selecting JFFLS facilitators
2.1  The role of JFFLS facilitators
2.2  Where to look for facilitators
2.3  Face-to-face briefing with facilitators
2.4  What to look for in a facilitator
2.5  Facilitating versus teaching
2.6  Facilitatorsí checklist for good practices
2.7  References
Step 3: Selecting JFFLS participants
3.1  Consultation with the community
      and other key stakeholders
3.2  Reaching out-of-school youth and avoiding
      selection mistakes
3.3  Terminology
3.4  References
Part III (529 KB)

Step 4: Curriculum development
4.1  What is a curriculum?
4.2  JFFLS learning activities
4.3  An integrated learning programme
4.4  Learning methods
4.5  Training materials and resource people
4.6  References
4.7  Annex 4.1
Step 5: Training JFFLS facilitators
5.1  Assessing training needs
5.2  Developing the training programme
5.3  Transportation
5.4  Evaluation of JFFLS facilitator training
5.5  References
Step 6: Arranging for food support
6.1  Food support
6.2  Food management, storage and safety
6.3  Food preparation
6.4  Exit strategy and sustainability for food assistance
6.5  References
Part IV (325 KB)

Step 7: Monitoring and evaluation
7.1  Preparing a results chain
7.2  Preparing a logframe
7.3  Participatory M&E
7.4  Collecting data
7.5  Impact evaluation
7.6  Reporting and use of results
7.7  JFFLS M&E roles and responsibilities
7.8  References
Step 8: On graduation... future activities
8.1  Recognizing and celebrating progress: graduation
8.2  JFFLS graduates and entrepreneurial skills
8.3  References
Step 9: Expanding and scaling up
9.1  Sharing experiences of what has worked
9.2  Sustainability
9.3  Linking with national poverty reduction
      strategy papers and sector-wide approaches
9.4  References