FAO COMMODITIES AND TRADE TECHNICAL PAPER
10
Rural household vulnerability and insurance against commodity risks

Evidence from the United Republic of Tanzania



Edited by
Luc Christiansen and Alexander Sarris


FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS

Rome, 2007


Download full PDF version 1433 kb


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© FAO 2006


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part I (465 KB)

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1 INTRODUCTION

REFERENCES
2 ASSETS, LIVELIHOODS AND POVERTY
2.1 INTRODUCTION
2.2 GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION
2.3 DEMOGRAPHICS AND ASSET BASE
2.4 LIVELIHOOD STRATEGIES
2.5 WELFARE OUTCOMES
2.6 CONCLUSION
REFERENCES

3 RISKS AND COPING STRATEGIES
3.1 INTRODUCTION
3.2 RISKS AND SHOCKS IN RURAL TANZANIA
3.2.1 DIMENSIONS OF RISK AND SHOCKS
3.2.2 INCIDENCE OF SHOCKS
3.2.3 CORRELATION OF RISKS
3.3 HOUSEHOLD COPING STRATEGIES
3.3.1 COPING STRATEGIES ADOPTED BY HOUSEHOLDS TO COPE WITH SHOCKS
3.3.2 COPING STRATEGIES BY CASH CROP AND NON-CASH CROP GROWER
3.3.3 COPING STRATEGIES BY TYPE OF SHOCK
3.4 CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Part II (326 KB)

REFERENCES
4 HOUSEHOLD VULNERABILITY
4.1 INTRODUCTION
4.2 METHODOLOGY
4.3 DATA
4.4 EMPIRICAL RESULTS
4.5 CONCLUSIONS AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS

REFERENCES
5 THE EFFECTS OF SHOCKS ON WELFARE AND POVERTY
5.1 INTRODUCTION
5.2 EMPIRICAL METHODOLOGY
5.3 DATA CONSIDERATIONS
5.4 DETERMINANTS OF WELFARE AND WELFARE EFFECTS OF SHOCKS
5.5 WELFARE EFFECTS OF SHOCKS AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COPING STRATEGIES
5.6 CORRELATES OF HOUSEHOLDS’ EX POST COPING CAPACITY
5.7 CONCLUDING REMARKS

REFERENCES
6. THE STATED BENEFITS FROM COMMODITY PRICE AND WEATHER INSURANCE
6.1 INTRODUCTION
6.2 EMPIRICAL METHODOLOGY AND THEORETICAL GROUNDING
6.3 THE DEMAND FOR COFFEE AND CASHEW PRICE INSURANCE
6.3.1 CASH CROP MARKETING AND PRICE VARIABILITY
6.3.2 INTEREST IN AND DEMAND FOR MINIMUM PRICE INSURANCE
6.3.3 THE SOCIETAL BENEFITS FROM PROVIDING MINIMUM PRICE INSURANCE
6.4 THE STATED DEMAND FOR AND SOCIETAL BENEFITS FROM WEATHER BASED INSURANCE
6.4.1 PERCEPTIONS CONCERNING RAINFALL
6.4.2 INTEREST IN AND WTP FOR RAINFALL INSURANCE
6.4.3 THE DEMAND CURVE FOR RAINFALL WEATHER INSURANCE AND THE WELFARE BENEFIT
FOR PROVIDING IT
6.5 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

Part III (537 KB)

APPENDIX A:
METHODOLOGY FOR DEFINING THE RAINFALL INSURANCE CONTRACTS IN KILIMANJARO AND RUVUMA
REFERENCES
APPENDIX 1: SURVEY AND SAMPLING DESIGN
APPENDIX 2: HOUSEHOLD AND COMMUNITY QUESTIONNAIRES
APPENDIX 3: NOTES ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE INCOME AND CONSUMPTION VARIABLES