WORKSHOP CLOSURE

Previous Page Table of Contents

WORKSHOP CLOSURE

In closing the workshop, the Chair thanked everybody for their participation and their inputs into the development of an important "call for action" and noted that the RPOA was important for those countries who had endorsed it in Bali, Indonesia. He considered that it formed a good starting point to improve management of fishing capacity and IUU fishing. He also stressed the importance of a regional approach (e.g. between Australia and Indonesia). He noted that although these are sensitive issues it was important countries of the region to join together to promote more responsible fishing, recognizing the important role of SEAFDEC and APFIC in this process. He suggested that any future work would be best organized into two sub-regions – Southeast Asia and South Asia. He concluded by thanking APFIC for its support and wished all participants a safe journey home.

The Acting Secretary of APFIC responded by advising the workshop that a sub-regional approach will be followed by APFIC. He also felt that the "call for action" should be pursued in parallel by Southeast Asian and South Asian countries. He thanked all participants for their input. He made a special thank you to the Thailand DOF support staff and the APFIC Secretariat, especially Rose David, for all the excellent arrangements. Finally he noted with gratitude, the support of Sida to the workshop.

ANNEX I

AGENDA OF THE REGIONAL WORKSHOP ON " MANAGING FISHING CAPACITY AND IUU FISHING IN ASIA"
Phuket, Thailand, 13–15 June 2007

TimeActivity
Day 1: 13 June 2007
08:30 – 09:00 Registration
09:00 – 09:30 Welcome remarks – DG Fisheries, Thailand
APFIC Chair – Dr Widi Pratikto
APFIC/FAO – Dr Simon Funge-Smith
09:30 – 09:35 Election of chair
Simon Funge-Smith
09:35 – 09:45 Group photo
09:45 – 10:30Coffee/Tea
10:30 – 10:40 Introduction to the Consultation – Objectives and outputs
Simon Funge-Smith, Acting Secretary APFIC
10:40 – 11:10 Overview of fishing capacity and IUU fishing in Asia
Gary Morgan, FAO Consultant
THEME I – Need for Capacity reduction and control of IUU fishing
11:10 – 11:30 Status of the resource
Derek Staples, FAO Consultant
11:30 – 11:50 What the fishers are saying
Suriyan Vichitlekarn, SEAFDEC
11:50 – 12:10 Socio-economic indicators of overcapacity
V. Vivekanandan, SIFFS
12:10 – 12:30 Cost/benefits of capacity management
Rolf Willmann, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
12.30 – 14.00Lunch
14:00 – 14.20 Social implications of capacity reduction
Chandrika Sharma, ICSF
THEME II – Current status in capacity reduction and control of IUU fishing
14:20 – 15:30 Country statements on need for capacity reduction and stopping IUU fishing and actions taken
APFIC countries
15:30 – 16:00Coffee/Tea
16:00 – 17:15 Country statements (continued)
17:15 – 17:30Wrap-up day 1 – plenary discussion
17:30 – 18:00Meeting of "Friends of the Chair"
18:30 – 20:30Poster session and reception

TimeActivity
Day 2: 14 June 2007
THEME III – Capacity reduction tools and actions
09:00 – 10:00 Partner Programs on capacity reduction and IUU fishing
Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries–Australia, SEAFDEC
10:00 – 10:20 Global setting – IPOAs and the benefits/costs of managing capacity and IUU fishing
Dominique Greboval, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
10:30 – 11:00Coffee/Tea
11:20 – 11:40 Capacity management: actual tools – what works and what doesn't
Rebecca Metzner, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
11:40 – 12:00 Combating IUU fishing – what works and what doesn't
David Doulman, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
12:00 – 12:20 Progress in managing fishing capacity and IUU fishing – implementation of the FAO
Code of Conduct in APFIC countries.
Pramod Ganapathiraju, University of British Columbia
THEME IV – Local, country and regional actions
12:20 – 12:30 Short introduction to the Working Groups
Simon Funge-Smith
12:30 – 14:00Lunch
14:00 – 17:00Working Group 1 – Capacity management
      • Future actions at local, country and regional levels
Working Group 2 – IUU fishing
      • Future actions at local, country and regional levels
Working Group 3 – Information needs
      • Information needs (focus on sub-regional alliances)
 Coffee/Tea available to Working groups
17:00 – 17:30 Plenary session – Preliminary findings/presentations of the three working groups
17:30 – 18:00 Meeting of " Friends of the Chair"
Day 3: 15 June 2007
THEME IV (continued)
09:00 – 09:20 Finalized presentation of combined Working Group outputs
09:20 – 10:00 Discussion
10:00 – 10:30Coffee/Tea
10:30 – 12:30 FREE
12.30 – 14:00Lunch
14.00 – 15:30 Workshop recommendations and actions
 Workshop closure

ANNEX IIA

WELCOME REMARKS OF DR SOMYING, DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, THAILAND

On behalf of the Department of Fisheries of Thailand, I would like to extend our warmest welcome and sincere appreciation to all of you here in Phuket. It is indeed a great pleasure to welcome you to the APFIC Regional Workshop on Managing Fishing Capacity and IUU Fishing in Asia.

This workshop is timely organized as we are all aware that fisheries have yet been sustainably managed. Many fish stocks are over-utilized. Fishing capacity and fishing effort exceeds the suitable level for resource sustainability. The illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing practices, apart from undermining our management measures, even further create threats and prevent the opportunity to reverse present practices to sustainable and responsible fisheries. These issues create a challenging task for all of us to establish collective actions for responsible fishing practices including mechanisms to reduce overcapacities, to combat IUU fishing and to ensure that fishery resources are utilized in a sustainable manner. The regional measures shall be based on the concepts stipulated in the international legal instruments and initiatives, including the International Plan of Action to Prevent, Deter, and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing and International Plan of Action for the Management of Fishing Capacity.

Thailand has a strong concern on the work to ensure vessel reduction and to curb the IUU fishing. A couple meetings were organized this year to formulate the national master plan for management of marine capture fisheries. Additionally, we are implementing the strategic actions to reduce the number of trawlers and push netters in the Gulf of Thailand. You may have a chance hear this issue in more details from the Thai participant.

Last but not least, I wish the workshop every success and look forward to an agreed action plan to address the issues that necessarily involves cooperation and partnership of all APFIC members, regional fishery bodies and other partners. I hope you have a pleasant stay in Phuket. I hope you explore and enjoy the beautiful sceneries and the beauty of Phuket.

Thank you for your attention

ANNEX IIB

OPENING STATEMENT OF THE CHAIR OF APFIC TO THE WORKSHOP

First of all, I would like to inform you that our APFIC Chair, Professor Widi Pratikto, would like to apologise for not being able to chair the meeting as he has an urgent international commitment in Europe this week. However, he welcomes all participants to the APFIC Regional Workshop on Managing Fishing Capacity and IUU Fishing in Asia.

I would also like to make some comments on the state of fisheries and IUU fishing in particular in the region and in Indonesia there are an increasing tendency of overcapacity and IUU fishing in our region (also in Indonesia). We have a number of shared stocks that need to be managed collaboratively among countries in the region and some problem of IUU fishing also need to be solved through regional cooperation. There is a need a common and collaborative approach to manage fishing capacity and to combat IUU fishing in the region. Therefore, we support APFIC's endeavours to improve the management of fishing capacity and combat IUU fishing.

One regional initiative of regional collaborative effort to promote responsible fishing practices, including management of fishing capacity, and combating IUU fishing has been undertaken by ten countries consisting of Indonesia, Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, The Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Timor-Leste and Viet Nam by formulating "Regional Plan of Action to Promote Responsible Fishing Practices including Combating IUU Fishing in the Region". This RPOA has been endorsed by the Ministers responsible for fisheries of those ten countries during "Regional Ministerial Meeting on Promoting Responsible Fishing Practices including Combating IUU Fishing in the Region" held in Bali, Indonesia, on 4th May 2007. We would like to distribute the RPOA and joint ministerial statement.

Finally, we would like to extend a welcome to APFIC Executive Committee Members to the 71st Session of the ExCo to be held in Jakarta 20–22 August 2007 and the next Regional Consultative Forum meeting and 30th Session of APFIC to be held in Indonesia in 2008.

ANNEX IIC

OPENING STATEMENT OF THE ACTING SECRETARY OF APFIC

As the Acting Secretary of the Asia-Pacific Fisheries Commission (APFIC), I welcome you all to the APFIC "Regional Workshop on Managing Fishing Capacity and IUU in Asia". Regional inter-sessional workshops on issues considered to be of major regional importance to the Commission have now become part of the Commission's biennial work plans. As well as this workshop there will be a second one on
"Fish Trade" to be held in Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam in September 2007. The recommendations coming from these two workshops will be further considered the APFIC biennial Consultative Forum Meeting and subsequent Commission session to be held in 2008, in Indonesia. Unlike in the past the Commission is encouraging the participation of its partners and the non-governmental organizations much more in its business and it is encouraging to see many of our partners here today. A special welcome to our partners.

During the workshop, you will be hearing and discussing several issues that all point to a major crisis occurring in the fisheries of many APFIC Member States. Rapid development of the fisheries during the 1970s and 80s has resulted, in many cases, in fisheries where the resource base has been severely depleted and the potential benefits from the fisheries are not being realized. Apart from a few wealthy investors, most people involved in fisheries are close to the poverty border line and do not gain much benefit from their activities. There are, therefore, many questions over the sustainability of these fisheries, as well as socio-economic and ethical concerns. The objective of the workshop is to take stock of where Asian fisheries are today and to chart out a future where fisheries can contribute much more significantly to the sustainable development of APFIC Member States. In preparing for this workshop, it became obvious that there are many gaps in our knowledge about what is happening in many Asian fisheries and a lack of information sharing about problem that are shared across the Members. I thank those Members who took the time to provide us with information through filling out our questionnaire and I encourage those who have not yet done so to complete them as soon as possible so that their information can be included in our regional overview.

Three days is not a long time to come up with solutions to the huge problems confronting fisheries in Asia today, but I would like to see a fairly well formulated action plan emerge from the workshop. I know you will all contribute constructively to achieve this goal. Most importantly we need a commitment to change the way that we have been managing fisheries in the past and a concerted effort to bring about those changes. APFIC, FAO and our partners are here to help you make these changes.

I would just like to take this opportunity at the outset to thank everyone who has enthusiastically contributed to what, I am sure, will be a very successful workshop.

Thank you.

ANNEX III

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

AUSTRALIA

Simon Veitch
Manager – International Fisheries
International Fisheries and Aquaculture Branch
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
G.P.O. Box 858, Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia
Tel: 61-2 6272 4643
Fax: 61-2 6272 4875
E-mail: simon.veitch@daff.gov.au

BANGLADESH

Md. Abdul Hamid Sr.

Assistant Secretary
Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock
Matshya Bhaban
1 Park Avenue, Dhaka 1000
Bangladesh
Tel: 88-02 7170052
Fax: 88-02 7161117
E-mail: secymofl@bttb.net.ba

CAMBODIA

Heng Sotharith

Chief, Exploitation Division
Department of Fisheries
No. 186, Preah Norodom Blvd.
P.O. Box 582
Phnom Penh
Cambodia
Tel: 855-23 215470
Fax: 855-23 215470
E-mail: hengsotharith@yahoo.com

CHINA

Ying-Qi Zhou

Shanghai Fisheries University
334 Jun Gong Road
Shanghai 200090
People's Republic of China
Tel: 8621-65710296
Fax: 8621-65684287
E-mail: yqzhou@shfu.edu.cn

INDIA

S.P. Chaturvedi

Assistant Commissioner (Fishery)
Department of Animal Husbandry
Dairying & Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture
Room No. 479A, Krishi Bhawan
Dr Rajendra Prasad Road
New Delhi – 110001, India
Tel: 91-11-23097014
Fax: 91-11-23384030
E-mail: shailchatur@yahoo.co.in

INDONESIA

Purwanto

Director, Fisheries Surveillance
Directorate-General of Surveillance and Control
Of Marine Fisheries and Marine Resources
Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries
Jl. Merdeka Timur 16, Jakarta 10110
Indonesia
Tel: 62-21 3523152
Fax: 62-21 3520346
E-mail: purwant@indosat.net.id
Trian Yunanda
Chief, Identification & Analysis for Fisheries
Resource Management in Territorial &
Archipelagic Water Section
Jl. Harsono, Rm No. 3, Ragunan, Pasar Minggu
Jakarta Selatan
Indonesia
Tel: 62-21 7811672
Fax: 62-21 7811672
E-mail: tryand_fish@yahoo.com

MALAYSIA

Ahmad Saktian bin Langgang

Head, Fisheries Resource Management Section
Department of Fisheries Malaysia
Tower Block 4G2, Wisma Tani, Presinct 4
Federal Government Administrative Centre
62628 Putrajaya
Malaysia
Tel: 603-88 704401
Fax: 603-88 891233
E-mail: saktian01@dof.gov.my

MYANMAR

U Thi Ha

Deputy Director
Department of Fisheries
Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries
Sinmin Road, Ahlone Township
Yangon
Myanmar
Tel: 095-1-223101
Fax: 095-1-228258
E-mail: DoF@mptmail.net.mm

PAKISTAN

Abdul Salam Baloch

Secretary, Fisheries and Coastal Development
Civil Secretariat
Government of Balochistan
Quetta, Pakistan
Tel: 081-920 1224
Fax: 081-920 2629
E-mail: govtfisheries.com

PHILIPPINES

Sandra Arcamo

Chief, Fisheries Resources Management Div.
Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
PCA Annex Building, Elliptical Road
Diliman, Quezon City 1101
Philippines
Tel: 63-2 9294894 / 9294946
Fax: 63-2 9294894
E-mail: sandyarcamo@yahoo.com

SRI LANKA

Don Simange Nandasena

Assistant Director (Actg.)
Fisheries Management Division
Department of Fisheries & Aquatic Resources
Maligawatta Secretariat, Colombo 10
Sri Lanka
Tel: 94-11 2449170
Fax: 94-11 2449170
E-mail: dsnandasena@fisheries.gov.lk

THAILAND

Somying Piumsomboon

Deputy Director-General
Department of Fisheries
Kasetsart University Campus
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
Thailand
Tel: 66-2 579 8094
Fax: 66-2 562 0571
E-mail: somyingp@fisheries.go.th
Pirochana Saikliang
Chumphon Marine Fisheries Research and
Development Center
408 Mu 8, Tambon Paknam
Amphur Muang, Chumphon 86120
Thailand
Tel: 66-07 752006-7
Fax: 66-07 752006
E-mail: pirochas@fisheries.go.th
Poungthong Onoora
Chief, International Law Group
Fisheries Foreign Affairs Division
Department of Fisheries
Kasetsart University Campus
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
Thailand
Tel: 66-2 5797941
Fax: 66-2 5797941
E-mail: poungthong2@yahoo.ie
Smith Thammachua
Chief, Overseas Fisheries and Economic
Cooperation Group
Fisheries Foreign Affairs Division
Department of Fisheries
Kasetsart University Campus
Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
Thailand
Tel: 66-2 5620529
Fax: 66-2 5620529
E-mail: thuma98105@yahoo.com

VIET NAM

Chu Tien Vinh

Director
National Directorate of Aquatic Resources
Exploitation & Protection
Ministry of Fisheries
10 Nguyen Cong Hoan Street
Ba Dinh District, Hanoi
Viet Nam
Tel: 84-9 13462 376 (mobile)
Fax: 84-4 8353 363
E-mail: chutienvinh@hn.vnn.vn

BAY OF BENGAL PROGRAMME INTER-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANISATION (BOBP-IGO)
Yugraj Yadava
Director
BOBP-Inter-Governmental Organisation
Post Bag No. 1054
Chennai 600-010, Tamil Nadu
India
Tel: 91-44 24936188; 24463714
Fax: 91-44 24936102
E-mail: bobpysy@md2.vsnl.net.in

INTERNATIONAL COLLECTIVE IN SUPPORT OF FISHWORKERS (ICSF)
Chandrika Sharma
Executive Secretary
International Collective in Support of
Fishworkers (ICSF)
27, College Road
Chennai 600 006, Tamil Nadu
India
Tel: 91-44 28275303
Fax: 91-44 28254457
E-mail: icsf@vsnl.com
V. Vivekanandan
Chief Executive
South Indian Federation of Fishermen
Societies (SIFFS)
Karamana, Thiruvananthapuram 695-002
Kerala
India
Tel: 91-471-2343711
Fax: 91-471 2342053
E-mail: vivek@siffs.org

SOUTHEAST ASIAN FISHERIES DEVELOPMENT CENTER (SEAFDEC)
Siri Ekmaharaj
SEAFDEC Secretary-General
SEAFDEC Secretariat
Suraswadi Building
P.O. Box 1046 Kasetsart University Post Office
Bangkok 10903, Thailand
Tel: 662 9406326-9
Fax: 662 9406336
E-mail: sg@seafdec.org
Yasuhisa Kato
Special Adviser
SEAFDEC Secretariat
Suraswadi Building
P.O. Box 1046 Kasetsart University Post Office
Bangkok 10903, Thailand
Tel: 662 9406326-9
Fax: 662 9406336
E-mail: kato@seafdec.org
Suriyan Vichitlekarn
Policy and Program Coordinator
SEAFDEC Secretariat
Suraswadi Building
P.O. Box 1046 Kasetsart University Post Office
Bangkok 10903, Thailand
Tel: 662 9406326-9
Fax: 662 9406336
E-mail: suriyan@seafdec.org
Pouchamarn Wongsanga
Information Program Coordinator
SEAFDEC Secretariat
Suraswadi Building
P.O. Box 1046 Kasetsart University Post Office
Bangkok 10903, Thailand
Tel: 662 9406326-9
Fax: 662 9406336
E-mail: pouchamarn@seafdec.org
Magnus Torell
Senior Advisor
SEAFDEC Secretariat
Suraswadi Building
P.O. Box 1046 Kasetsart University Post Office
Bangkok 10903, Thailand
Tel: 662 9406326-9
Fax: 662 9406336
E-mail: magnus@seafdec.org
Worawit Wanchana
Program Manager
SEAFDEC Secretariat
Suraswadi Building
P.O. Box 1046 Kasetsart University Post Office
Bangkok 10903, Thailand
Tel: 662 9406326-9
Fax: 662 9406336
E-mail: Worawit@seafdec.org
Yuttana Theparoonrat
Head, Coastal Fisheries Management Division
SEAFDEC Training Department
P.O. Box 97
Phrasamutchedi, Samut Prakan 10290
Thailand
Tel: 662 4256100
Fax: 662 4256110
E-mail: yuttana@seafdec.org
Somboon Siriraksophon
Head, Capture Fisheries Technology Division
SEAFDEC Training Department
P.O. Box 97
Phrasamutchedi, Samut Prakan 10290
Thailand
Tel: 662 4256100
Fax: 662 4256110
E-mail: somboon@seafdec.org
Rosidi Ali
Senior Fishery Officer
SEAFDEC Marine Fishery Resources
Development and Management Department
Taman Perikan Chendering
21080 Kuala Terengganu
Malaysia
Tel: 609-6163150
Fax: 609-6175136
E-mail: rosidi@mfrdmd.org.my

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (UBC)
Pramod Ganapathiraju
University of British Colombia
AERL 2202, Main Hall
UBC, Vancouver, BC
V6T 1Z4
Canada
Tel: +1 (604) 822-273
Fax: +1 (604) 822-8934
E-mail: prammod.raju@gmail.com
UNIVERSITY OF ICELAND
Ragnar Arnason
Professor
Department of Economics
University of Iceland
Fax: 354-552-6806
 
OBSERVERS
Pramuan Rugjai
Director
Cluster of Fishing Port Operation (Lower South),
Fish Marketing Organization
Sathorn, Bangkok 10120
Thailand
Tel: 66-76 215489
Fax: 66-76 211699
E-mail: rugpra@hotmail.com
Pakjuta Khemakorn
Southern marine Fisheries Research and
Development Center
79/1 Wichianchom Rd., Boyang
Muang, Songkhla 90000
Thailand
Tel: 66-81 8964702
Fax: 66-74 312495
E-mail: Pakjuta@gmail.com

FAO FISHERIES DEPARTMENT
Dominique Greboval
Senior Fishery Officer
Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome, Italy
Tel: +39 06 5705 4828
Fax: +39 06 5705 2476
E-mail: Dominique.greboval@fao.org
David Doulman
Senior Fishery Officer
Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome, Italy
Tel: +39 0657054949
Fax: +39 0657056500
E-mail: david.doulman@fao.org
Rolf Willmann
Senior Fishery Officer
Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome, Italy
Tel: +39 0657053408
Fax: +39 0657056500
E-mail: Rolf.Willmann@fao.org
Rebecca Metzner
Fishery Analyst
Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome, Italy
Tel: +39 0657056718
Fax: +39 0657056500
E-mail: Rebecca.Metzner@fao.org

FAO RAP
Simon Funge-Smith
APFIC Secretary a.i.
Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
39 Phra Athit Road, Bangkok 10200
Thailand
Tel: 662-6974149
Fax: 662-6974445
E-mail: simon.fungesmith@fao.org
Niklas Mattson
Fisheries Operations Officer
Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
39 Phra Athit Road, Bangkok 10200
Thailand

Fax: 662-6974455
E-mail: Niklas.Mattson@fao.org
David Lymer
APO Fishery Statistics
Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific


Derek J. Staples
FAO Consultant
c/o FAO RAP


E-mail: derekstap@gmail.com
Gary Morgan
FAO Consultant
c/o FAO RAP
Tel: 662-6974260
Fax: 662-6974445
E-mail: garymorg@hotmail.com
Pornsuda David
Technical Assistant
Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific

Fax: 662-6974445

SECRETARIAT

DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
Praulai Nootmorn
Liaison Officer of the Workshop

FAO REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
Simon Funge-Smith
APFIC Secretary a.i.
David Lymer
APO Fishery Statistics
Derek Staples
FAO Consultant
Gary Morgan
FAO Consultant
Pornsuda David
Technical Assistant

ANNEX IV

Management tool box with notes on duration of impact, direct and longer-term effects

Management Tool Duration Direct Effect(s) Longer-term Effect(s)
Gear restrictions vessel restrictions Temporary initial reduction in harvests
  • substitution of unregulated inputs or new gear types to replace restricted inputs
  • regulations lose effectiveness and additional regulations required
  • create motives for IUU fishing
  • capacity will increase
Limited entry programmes Temporary Limit participation
  • capital stuffing – where a vessel's horsepower, length, breadth, and tonnage are increased – typically occurs
  • drives changes (technological innovations) in gear, in fishing periods or areas
  • create motives for IUU fishing
  • capacity will increase
Aggregate quotas total allowable catches (TACs) Temporary Likely to accelerate, not reduce, the growth of fishing capacity
  • capacity and effort increase if effort and entry unrestricted
  • race for fish ("fishing derby") develops
  • potential for frequent overruns of the TAC resulting in overexploitation frequently result in excess processing capacity and processing plant down time during closed season(s) additional regulations required, particularly to limit discarding and false reporting, ensure traceability and to control transshipment
  • create motives for IUU fishing
  • capacity will increase
Non-transferable vessel catch limits (individual quotas/IQs) Temporary overcapacity not addressed may limit additional growth of capacity
  • requires regulations to ensure traceability and to control transshipment
  • additional regulations required
  • create motives for IUU fishing
  • capacity will increase
Vessel buy-back programmes Temporary purchase of vessel(s), license(s), and/or gear(s) capacity may be temporarily
reduced in the fishery
  • any improvements in stock abundance will attract additional capacity
  • create motives for IUU fishing
  • capacity will increase
Individual effort quotas (IEQs) denominated in trawl time, gear use, time away from port, fishing days, etc. mid-term only
  • enforcement difficult
  • additional regula-tions required to control input substitution
  • capital stuffing – where a vessel's horsepower, length, breadth, and tonnage are increased – frequently occurs
  • requires regulations to ensure traceability and to control transshipment
  • create motives for IUU fishing
  • capacity will increase
Group fishing rights
Community Development Quotas (CDQs)
potentially enduring
  • reallocation of the fishery to the recipient community
  • requires group understanding of asset value of user rights, capability to manage
  • reduction of overcapacity or capacity containment depends on subsequent management
Territorial Use Rights (TURFs)
Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MEABRs)
Limited Access
Privilege Programs (LAPPs)
Designated Access
Privilege Programs (DAPPs)
potentially enduring
  • reallocation of the fishery to the recipient community
  • requires group understanding of asset value of user rights, capability to manage
  • reduction of overcapacity or containment of capacity linked to subsequent management
Individual fishing rights (IFQs)
Individual transferable quotas (ITQs)
potentially enduring
  • market forces drive out overcapacity
  • consolidation occurs if overcapitalized
  • capacity managed automatically, overcapacity does not occur/recur
  • compliance concerns internalized by fishers to protect asset (rally against IUU fishing) supplementary regulations helpful to reinforce conservation
Taxes and royalties indefinite duration
  • market forces drive out overcapacity
  • consolidation if overcapitalized
  • administratively intensive: require constant adjustment of tax levels to maintain capacity at desired level
  • politically difficult to impose, easier to rescind

Source: FAO (2004).

ANNEX V

Regional Plan of Action (RPOA) to Promote Responsible Fishing Practices including Combating IUU Fishing in the Region6

Contents

Current resource and management situation in the region 37
Implementation of international and regional instruments 38
Role of regional and multilateral organizations 38
Coastal State responsibilities 38
Flag State responsibilities 39
Port State measures 39
Regional market measures. 40
Regional capacity building 40
Strengthening monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) systems 40
Transshipment at sea 41
Implementation 41

_________
6 Republic of Indonesia, Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Timor-Leste and Viet Nam.

Regional Plan of Action (RPOA) to Promote Responsible Fishing Practices including Combating IUU Fishing in the Region

Introduction

  1. Fishing activity makes an important contribution to the food security and economic well-being of the region. However, increases in overexploitation and illegal fishing practices, have hastened the depletion of many fish stocks. For this reason, fishery resources must be managed sustainably, and responsible fishing practices need to be promoted.
  2. Regional cooperation is critical for the long-term sustainable protection of the living marine resource and the marine environment. Whilst some of the root causes of the depletion of fisheries resources can be addressed at the national level, many can only be successfully addressed through regional action. This is particularly the case in the areas with interdependent marine ecosystems, adjoining maritime boundaries and shared fish stocks.

Objective and framework

  1. The objective of this RPOA is to enhance and strengthen the overall level of fisheries management in the region, in order to sustain fisheries resources and the marine environment, and to optimise the benefit of adopting responsible fishing practices. The actions cover conservation of fisheries resources and their environment, managing fishing capacity, and combating illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing in the areas of the South China Sea, Sulu-Sulawesi Seas (Celebes Sea) and the Arafura-Timor Seas.
  2. This RPOA is a voluntary instrument and takes its core principles from already established international fisheries instruments for promoting responsible fishing practices, including the 1982
    `United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea' (UNCLOS), in particular Articles 61 through 64, 116-119 and 123, the `United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement' (UNFSA), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) `Compliance Agreement' and the FAO `Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries'. The RPOA is consistent with existing treaties, agreements and arrangements and all other plans and programmes relevant to the sustainable management of the region's living marine resources.
  3. This RPOA also draws upon the FAO International Plan of Action (IPOA) for the Conservation and Management of Sharks', the `IPOA for the Management of Fishing Capacity', and the `IPOA to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing', the `IPOA for Reducing the Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries', which contain internationally agreed measures, applicable to national and regional plans to promote responsible fishing practices and, more recently, the FAO `Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat IUU Fishing'.

Action Plan

Current resource and management situation in the region

  1. The RPOA notes and affirms that the shared fish stocks are a very important source of food for people in the region, utilized by countries in the region and also traded both in and outside the region. Both overfishing and illegal fishing are seriously depleting the region's fish stocks. In this regard, the promotion of responsible fishing practices, and prevention, deterrence and elimination of illegal fishing are essential to ensure food security and poverty alleviation in the region and countries in the region should:
1.1 work together on compiling an overview of artisanal and industrial fishing, the current status of fish stocks, trade flows and markets.

Implementation of international and regional instruments

  1. International instruments contain structures and measures upon which to build long term sustainable fisheries. The key global instruments that countries should consider when implementing responsible fishing practices include the 1982 `United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea' (UNCLOS), the `United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement' (UNFSA), the FAO `Compliance Agreement', the FAO `Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries', the `International Plan of Action (IPOA) to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing', the `IPOA for Reducing Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries', the `IPOA for the Conservation and Management of Sharks' and the `IPOA for the Management of Fishing Capacity'. Relevant regional instruments include the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) and the Agreement Establishing the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC). To support these measures, countries in the region are encouraged to:
2.1 work toward ratification, accession, and/or acceptance and full implementation, of UNCLOS and UNFSA;
2.2 work towards ratification and/or acceptance of regional fisheries management instruments, where appropriate; and
2.3 work toward acceptance and full implementation of relevant regional and multilateral arrangements, where appropriate.

Role of regional and multilateral organizations

  1. Implementing responsible fishing practices and combating IUU fishing are issues for the whole region. Articles 63, 64 and 116-119 of the UNCLOS requires countries to cooperate in the conservation and management of shared stocks and highly migratory species. The management expertise and technical capacity built up over the years by regional organizations should be harnessed to assist with the problems of the region.
3.1 Countries should work closely and collaboratively with regional organizations to develop conservation and management measures for fish stocks to promote optimum utilization.
  1. Countries acknowledge the important roles of regional organizations in strengthening fisheries management and conservation in the region including the FAO/APFIC, WCPFC, IOTC, the
    Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), ASEAN, INFOFISH, the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC), and WorldFish Center. The measures promoted by these organizations which may be applicable to this RPOA should be supported by all participating countries where relevant.
4.1 Countries should encourage relevant regional organizations to provide assistance in technical support and development of guidelines for conservation and fisheries management, capacity building, sharing data and information on fisheries and trade, and strengthening networking for the purpose of enhancing participation and ensuring implementation of conservation and management measures in the region.

Coastal State responsibilities

  1. The collection, management and availability of accurate and timely information are essential in managing fishery resources and combating illegal fishing. Accurate data on the number of fishing vessels and fishing activity is required to provide for responsible fishing, hence the importance of maintaining comprehensive and up-todate vessel registers and catch and effort information by all States, both coastal and flag. To help address this concern, countries in the region should:
5.1 work together to improve their data collection systems and to share information about vessels, fishing effort, catch levels, fish landings and sales of fish and fish products, as appropriate, and;
5.2 work to develop a regional approach to identify, compile and exchange information on any vessel used or intended for use for the purpose of fishing including support ships, carrier vessels and any other vessels directly involved in such fishing operations in the region on straddling and migratory stocks and across national jurisdictions.
  1. Control of fishing capacity and fishing effort are fundamental elements of fisheries management. When the capacity of fishing fleets to harvest a resource exceeds the sustainable level, it results in unsustainable fishing activity and has the potential to `spill-over' into illegal fishing activity. This RPOA acknowledges that countries should manage the fishing capacity of their fleets by:
6.1 assessing the status of their fishery resources and fishing fleet capacity;
6.2 introducing management measures to help prevent fishing capacity from exceeding levels that result in harvest rates that impede the ability of fish stocks to reproduce sustainably over the longer term;
6.3 undertaking planning to reduce overcapacity without shifting that capacity to other fisheries whose resources may be already fished at the maximum sustainable rate or above that rate, taking into consideration potential socio-economic impacts;
6.4 cooperating to assess, conserve and manage fishery resources where they straddle national boundaries or occur both within EEZs and in an area beyond and adjacent to the EEZ;
6.5 undertaking to develop and implement national plans of action to accelerate their efforts to reduce overcapacity and eliminate illegal fishing activity where these issues are known to occur;
6.6 working on the collection, management and sharing of information on fisheries management, and the management of fishing capacity; and
6.7 respecting traditional, artisanal and small-scale fisheries and providing assistance with the management of these fisheries resources.

Flag State responsibilities

  1. Coastal States through their flag State responsibilities in the region are at the forefront in implementing sustainable fishing practices and combating illegal fishing. To address this need:
7.1 all coastal States, relevant flag States and fishing entities operating in the region should actively cooperate in ensuring that fishing vessels entitled to fly their flags do not undermine the effectiveness of conservation and management measures, including engagement in or supporting illegal fishing.

Port State Measures

  1. Port States play a key role in combating illegal and unreported fishing in the region, given the need to land catch and support fishing activities. In this regard, regional countries and fishing entities need to develop measures to regulate fishing vessels accessing their ports for transhipping and/or landing catch and collect and exchange relevant data. To address this need, countries should consider:
8.1 Adopting Port State Measures, where appropriate, based on the FAO `Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat IUU Fishing 7.

___________
7 Noting recent developments in the FAO to negotiate a binding international agreement on Port State Measures, the Parties to the RPOA agreed to consider the provision of the FAO document once it is completed.

Regional market measures

  1. In order to minimize unreported and illegal catches, countries should collaborate to implement regional market measures to identify and to track fish catches at all points in the marketing chain in a consistent way with existing international trade laws.
9.1 As a priority, countries in the region should standardize catch and landing documentation throughout the region and implement catch documentation or trade certification schemes for high value product.
9.2 In addition, countries should work with organizations such as INFOFISH to produce regular and timely market reports allowing trade flows to be analyzed.
9.3 Countries should check trade discrepancies regarding export of fish and fish product and take appropriate action and, as a minimum, report these discrepancies to the flag State.

Regional capacity building

  1. Capacity building in all aspects of fisheries management must be encouraged. Countries are aware that a fully effective system requires technically competent implementation and operation. Technical and administrative staff require access to both formal and on-the-job training to build the requisite experience and competence in matters such as fisheries resource assessments, introduction of monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) measures and development of fish product tracking systems. To build these capacities, countries should:
10.1 continue developing the appropriate core competencies for fisheries research, management and compliance, including MCS systems;
10.2 either individually or jointly, seek technical and financial assistance from relevant international development agencies and donors as well as other countries in the region; and
10.3 ensure that flag States from outside the region that operate in the region be urged to cooperate with, and assist technically and financially, those countries in the region in whose waters they conduct fishing operations.

Strengthening monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) systems

  1. An MCS system, at both a national and regional level, supports and underpins a robust fisheries management regime. A strong enforcement network can share data and information on enforcement strategies and provide advice and capacity building. To better coordinate efforts against illegal activity, countries should develop suitable and relevant inter-agency arrangements to develop their networks to quickly share information such as locations, names of vessels, ports used (home and/or unloading port) and species targeted, and other information as appropriate. To develop these capacities, countries should:
11.1 enter into appropriate sub-regional MCS arrangements to promote the elimination of IUU fishing within the region;
11.2 develop a regional MCS network to promote the sharing of information and to coordinate regional activities to support the promotion of responsible fishing practices. Where possible, also participate in the work of the International MCS Network.
11.3 promote knowledge and understanding within their fishing industries about MCS activities to enhance sustainable fisheries management and to help combat IUU fishing; and
11.4 develop, as appropriate, observer programmes including the requirement for industry to adhere to inspection regimes and carry observers on board when required.

Transshipment at sea

  1. Transshipment outside the territorial sea should be regulated to prevent illegal fishers from using it to launder their catches. Stronger monitoring, control and surveillance of both fishing and carrier vessels is a priority. To implement this, countries should:
12.1 monitor and control the transshipment of fisheries resources; and
12.2 establish control measures such as vessel registers, mandatory notification of the intention to transship and the application of vessel monitoring systems.

Implementation

  1. Countries agree to support the ongoing development of the cooperative arrangements embodied
    in this RPOA. The effective implementation of the RPOA will be reviewed as determined by
    a Coordination Committee to be comprised of officials from each participating country and communicated to the FAO's Committee on Fisheries and other regional bodies as appropriate.

ANNEX VIA

PRIORITY ACTIONS AND IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES – WORKING GROUP 1 – MANAGING FISHING CAPACITY

Action How When Who
Ranked #1
3. Countries should assess the status of their fishery resources and fishing fleet capacity.
  • Develop registry of fishing vessels/gear, or at least counts by categories of vessels
  • Consult stakeholder e.g. workshops
  • Deploy resource surveys
  • Assess time series of fishing capacity and cpue
  • Monitor impact of technical progress
  • Yesterday…
  • Note: some countries already have assessments
  • Initiated by National administration
  • Scientific institutions
  • Fishery stakeholders (large- and small-scale)
  • Support from regional institutions and international technical and financial assistance as required
Ranked #2
5. Countries should undertake planning to reduce overcapacity without shifting that capacity to other fisheries whose resources may be already fished at the maximum sustainable rate or above that rate, taking into consideration potential socioeconomic impacts.
  • Select manageable number of fisheries, considered most problematic
  • Set clear targets for reduction needs to be set (bottom trawling specifically mentioned)
  • Ensure capacity reduction programme that integrates the necessary measures to effectively freeze capacity at the lower target level
  • Profile the fishery in a consultative planning process and agree on how to prepare for closing access
  • Establish comanagement, involving relevant fishers
  • Integrate exit/reemployment into the planning
  • Ensure involvement of the fishing industry
  • Ensure plan contains measures to prevent re-entry
  • Starting today
  • Cabinet decision to go ahead with blueprint for capacity reduction programme.
  • National administration (not only DOF) (initiates)
  • Scientific institutions
  • Fishery stakeholders, large as well as smallscale
  • Support from Regional institutions and international technical and financial assistance as required
Ranked #3
8. Countries should undertake to develop and implement national plans of action to accelerate their efforts to manage fishing capacity
  • Elaborate plan in a consultative manner, adopt it and implement
  • Include status of fishing capacity and management requirements
  • Consider existing policy and regulatory framework and change as required
  • Address related issues such as access, subsidies etc.
  • Secure funding of implementation
  • Refer to existing RPOA
 
  • National administration (not only DOF) (initiates)
  • Scientific institutions
  • Fishery stakeholders, large as well as smallscale
  • Support from Regional institutions and international technical and financial assistance as required
Ranked #4
4. Countries should introduce management measures to help prevent fishing capacity from exceeding levels that result in harvest rates that impede the ability of fish stocks to reproduce sustainably over the longer term.
  • Organize co-management of fishing capacity
  • Establish/maintain licensing system
  • Introduce access limitation
  • Introduce rent reallocation scheme (e.g. tax, community funds)
  • Stop perverse subsidies
  • Use buy-back schemes
  • Establish closed areas/seasons
  • Integrate fisheries management into habitat management
  • Yesterday
  • National administration (not only DOF) (initiates)
  • Scientific institutions
  • Fishery stakeholders, large as well as smallscale
  • Support from Regional institutions and international technical and financial assistance as required
Ranked #5
2. Countries should encourage relevant regional organizations to provide assistance in technical support and development of guidelines for conservation and fisheries management, capacity building, sharing data and information on fisheries and trade, and strengthening networking for the purpose of enhancing participation and ensuring implementation of conservation and management measures in the region.
  • Countries ask for assistance
  • RFOs assist with standards for data to facilitate sharing of information
  • Use existing RFOs to arrive at common approaches to manage fishing capacity
  • Hold workshops/training to build governance and management capacity
  • Share of technical expertise between countries
  • Request and develop regional projects through RFOs, IFOs or among themselves
  • Use RFOs to develop mechanisms for agreeing on bilateral and multilateral agreements
  • Ongoing!
  • Member countries of RFOs (initiates)
  • National administration
  • Scientific institutions
  • Support from Regional
  • institutions and international technical and financial assistance as required

ANNEX VIB

PRIORITY ACTIONS AND IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES – WORKING GROUP 2 – IUU FISHING

Action How When Who
All coastal States, relevant flag States and fishing entities operating in the region should actively cooperate in ensuring that fishing vessels entitled to fly their flags do not undermine the effectiveness of conservation and management measures, including engagement in or supporting illegal fishing.
  • No. 1 priority.
  • Review policy and legislation and revise as necessary to include registering, recording and authorising fishing vessels.
  • Promote regional collaboration and approaches.
  • Exchange information on fishing activities.
  • Promotion of regional guidelines for registering, recording and authorising fishing vessels.
  • Review of policy, <1 year, review and revise legislation <5 years
  • Within 6 months
  • Within 6 months
  • Within 1 year
  • Governments in consultation with stakeholders as appropriate with technical assistance from international organizations as required.
  • APFIC to take lead in consultation with national fishery administrations.
  • National fisheries administrations to identify contact points.
  • Technical assistance from international organizations as required.
Countries should consider adopting Port State Measures, where appropriate, based on the FAO ‘Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat IUU Fishing8.
  • No. 2 priority.
  • Undertake interagency consultation and collaboration
  • Review policy and legislation and revise as necessary and where absent, establish and/ or legislate Port State control mechanisms.
  • Undertake capacity building and training
  • Within 1 year
  • Review of policy, <1 year, review and revise legislation <5 years
  • Within 1 year
  • National fisheries administrations
  • Governments in consultation
  • with stakeholders as appropriate with technical assistance from international organizations as required.
  • National Governments with technical assistance from international organizations as required.
Countries should establish control measures such as vessel registers, mandatory notification of the intention to transship and the application of vessel monitoring systems.
  • No. 3 priority.
  • Assessment of existing vessel registry systems, mandatory notification and VMS use, including compatibility with a view to further collaboration.
  • Within 2 years
  • National Governments with technical assistance from international organizations as required.
Countries should undertake to develop and implement national plans of action to accelerate their efforts to reduce overcapacity and eliminate illegal fishing activity where these issues are known to occur.
  • No. 4 priority.
  • With regards, NPOAs on IUU fishing.
  • Assess IUU fishing situation in each country.
  • Review and revise existing, or develop, NPOAs taking account national approaches to fisheries management and gap analysis.
  • Within 1 year
  • Within 2 years
  • National fisheries administrations and other relevant agencies
  • Governments in consultation with stakeholders as appropriate with technical assistance from international organisations as required.
Countries should develop a regional MCS network to promote the sharing of information and to coordinate regional activities to support the promotion of responsible fishing practices.
  • No. 5 priority.
  • Develop and link national MCS systems for regional MCS information sharing.
  • Undertake capacity building.
  • Within 3 years
  • Within 2 years
  • National Governments with technical assistance from regional and international organizations as required
  • National Governments with technical assistance from regional and international organizations as required

_________
8 Noting recent developments in the FAO to negotiate a binding international agreement on Port State Measures, the Parties to the RPOA agreed to consider the provision of the FAO document once it is completed.

ANNEX VIC

PRIORITY ACTIONS AND IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES – WORKING GROUP 3 – INFORMATION NEEDS

Action How When Who
6.1 Assess the status of fishery resources and fishing fleet capacity
  • Surveys
  • Indicators for resource status/capacity
  • Catch statistics at landing sites
  • Vessel register (length, tonnage, gear)
  • Analyses of existing data
  • History of fishing development
  • Census
  • Strengthen existing
  • Regional Technical Consultancy
  • Immediate
  • and then annual/biennial
  • (medium/long-term)
  • By setting target date
  • Countries with support of RO/IO (SEAFEC/ FAO)
  • Countries with central registry
  • Countries
  • With fishers
11.2, 12.2, 5.2 Strengthen MCS systems-vessel
  • Vessel registers (black & white)
  • Link with Global MCS network
  • Review of law & regulation
  • Develop VMS system
  • VMS on <20 m vessels or outside EEZ
  • Norms & standard for vessels
  • Start now
  • Countries with RO/IO support & IMO
  • WWF
  • Maritime Security Agency
4.1, 10.1, 10.2 Engage regional organizations
  • Workshops
  • Regional advisory body
  • Regional database
  • Give mandate (i) SE Asia (ii) S Asia
  • Provide capacity development for data, info, management, sharing
  • Develop Programme/project proposals
  • MOU for countries
  • National focal points
  • When resources available
  • Countries under APFIC/ FAO
  • Donors
  • Regional organizations
5.1, 9.1 Work together to improve and standardize data
  • Agree on regional standards
  • Political commitment to collect & share data
  • Stakeholder involvement
  • Urgently
  • Countries with support from RO/IO
6.6 Collect and share information on management and capacity reduction
  • Country reports
  • Regional reviews
  • Improve internet connectivity
  • Website
  • Web-based info
  • Ongoing
  • Biennial reporting
  • SEAFDEC/APFIC
  • Donors

Previous Page Top of Page