Indigenous and Tribal peoples: Building on biological and cultural diversity for food and livelihood security
Indigenous and Tribal Peoples: Building on Biological and Cultural Diversity for Food and Livelihood Security


INDIGENOUS AND TRIBAL PEOPLES:
BUILDING ON BIOLOGICAL AND
CULTURAL DIVERSITY FOR FOOD
AND LIVELIHOOD SECURITY





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Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Rome 2009


ABSTRACT

When the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were adopted in 2000, the international community made an unprecedented pledge to meet the needs of the world’s poor and to safeguard them against the threats of the twenty-first century.2 Leaders of 147 states reaffirmed the principles of poverty reduction, democratic governance, and human rights protection, which have been at the heart of the United Nations system since its creation after the Second World War. Today these principles demand renewed effort as the disparities between the world’s poorest and wealthiest are increasing, and poor people’s livelihoods are becoming evermore vulnerable to new socio-economic and environmental challenges.



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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part I -  Download 189Kb

ACRONYMS

FOREWARD

Part II -  Download 747Kb

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I. INTRODUCTION

II. BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT

     Who are indigenous peoples?
     The situation of indigenous peoples worldwide
     Core principles of indigenous peoples’ identity and advocacy

III.THE INTERNATIONAL NORMATIVE, LEGAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK

IV. FAO AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

     Why is it important to engage indigenous peoples in development work?
     How cultural and biological diversity can support FAO’s efforts for food
     and livelihood security
     FAO’s current work on indigenous peoples’ issues

V. CHALLENGES AND CONSIDERATIONS

     Climate change and disaster management
     Biofuel production and changing food prices
     Extractive industries

VI. A SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOODS APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENT

     Mechanisms for greater engagement with indigenous issues

VII. CONCLUSIONS AND THE WAY FORWARD

Part III -  Download 386Kb

REFERENCES

     Websites

ANNEX

     Sharing knowledge through art

© FAO 2009